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Air quality better around Tonawanda Coke, says DEC

The air coming off the Tonawanda Coke plant is considerably cleaner than it was. That was the message two state officials delivered to a public meeting in the Town of Tonawanda Tuesday night.
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Photo from University at Buffalo website.

A local professor is being put on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board. Joseph Gardella is a professor of chemistry at the University of Buffalo and has been appointed to serve a 3 year term on the board.   

Authorities have seized 100 snakes, lots of rats, two miniature pigs and a few dozen birds from a Niagara County home where dozens of creatures were found dead. 

Hulton Archive/Getty Images / National Public Radio

Local veterans and their supporters are marking the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor with  remembrance services.

A speedy passage of Erie County's budget for next year temporarily stalled Tuesday over $100,000 to help Visit Buffalo Niagara's efforts to legalize use of ride-sharing services, like Uber and Lyft, Upstate.

Photo courtesy of Karen Dewitt

The state’s Attorney General has released a package of bills aimed at improving what he says is the state’s “arcane” and “ridiculous” voting laws that bar many potential voters from the ballot box.


A Buffalo man has been sentenced to 22-years-to-life in prison for the beating and sexual assault on a local woman walking home in Willert Park.

WBFO File Photo

The air coming off the Tonawanda Coke plant is considerably cleaner than it was. That was the message two state officials delivered to a public meeting in the Town of Tonawanda Tuesday night.

Rich Wall / Buffalo Niagara Film Commission

A Hollywood-based filmmaker who has already shot several movies in Western New York is back in Buffalo for his latest production. And Fred Olen Ray says he keeps finding new locations throughout the region, meaning his love affair with Western New York is far from over.


Buffalo Spree

Two ubiquitous seasonings, salt and pepper, have influenced the course of history and humankind. Buffalo Spree senior editor Wendy Guild Swearingen recently sat down with writer and food aficionado Christa Glennie Seychew to talk about her article in the December issue of Spree, which examines the histories of salt and pepper and how the condiments are being used today.


When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, "You're not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor."

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

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Great Lakes Today

Major funding for Great Lakes Today on WBFO is provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people

Residents from across upstate N.Y. address issues that have significant effects on their lives

Heritage Moments

Portrait in “Three Years in Europe: Places I Have Seen and People I Have Met,” via Project Gutenberg

Heritage Moments: Fugitive slave fights for a family's freedom

In his 1847 memoir, “Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave,” the abolitionist William Wells Brown recalled the years he spent in Buffalo as a worker on lake boats. He remembered one dramatic episode from his Buffalo years in gripping detail.
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NPR News

When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, "You're not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor."

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

Seventy-five years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, some Americans have never stopped believing that President Franklin Roosevelt let it happen in order to draw the U.S. into World War II.

"It's ridiculous," says Rob Citino, a senior researcher at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. "But it's evergreen. It never stops. My students, over 30 years — there'd always be someone in class [who'd say], 'Roosevelt knew all about it.'"

President-elect Donald Trump has chosen Dr. Ben Carson to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development in his incoming administration.

"Ben Carson has a brilliant mind and is passionate about strengthening communities and families within those communities," Trump said in a statement released Monday. "We have talked at length about my urban renewal agenda and our message of economic revival, very much including our inner cities."

The world breathed a sigh of relief when West Africa’s Ebola outbreak came to an end earlier this year, closing the books on the largest and most deadly epidemic in history.

More than 28,500 people were infected and more than 11,000 died in just two years.

But while the outbreak might already feel like a distant memory, Ebola and other viral hemorrhagic fevers are still a fact of life across communities in Africa.

At a rally in Cincinnati on Thursday night, President-elect Donald Trump said he would select retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis to lead the Defense Department, filling a key role in the incoming administration. Mattis, 66, is famous for both his blunt talk and his engaging leadership in recent U.S. conflicts.

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