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City snow plow crews continue working to stay ahead of the storm

With a third band of lake effect snow expected to his the City of Buffalo, snow plow crews are continuing to work to stay ahead of the weather.
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WNY Law Center

Despite the Buffalo area's resurgence, thousands of  "zombie properties" continue dragging down neighborhoods. So Assemblyman Michael Kearns is stepping up the Bank Shame Campaign.

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With a third band of lake effect snow expected to his the City of Buffalo, snow plow crews are continuing to work to stay ahead of the weather.

WBFO file photo by Eileen Buckley

February 12 marks the 7th anniversary of the tragic crash of Continental Flight 3407 in Clarence Center.

Ryan Beiter

You may notice that “new car smell” if you’re driving through downtown Buffalo this weekend. The 2016 Buffalo Auto Show is now underway at the Buffalo Niagara Convention Center, where more than 250 new vehicles are on display through Sunday.

WBFO file photo by Eileen Buckley

SUNY has announced a round of funding for 16-campuses to establish or expand an Educational Opportunity Program. WBFO's Focus on Education Reporter says SUNY Buffalo State and the University at Buffalo will both receiving funding for their programs.

Many schools close as storm approaches

8 hours ago
WBFO

Many schools are closed today in anticipation of the severe weather.

Mike Desmond/wbfo news

Erie County legislators are pondering the future of the county's ban on plastic microbeads used in personal care products that are considered an environmental threat to the Great Lakes. The ban takes effect on Sunday.


Portrait of Francis Johnson. Music Division, The New York Public Library.

Black history on the Niagara Frontier is long, rich and varied, a story that stretches from Joe Hodge, the trapper and trader who lived on Cattaraugus Creek and Buffalo Creek in the 1790s, to the Coloured Corps, the company of black soldiers who defended Upper Canada against the American invaders in the War of 1812, to William Wells Brown and the black Buffalonians who fought off So

Mike Desmond/wbfo news

Race relations in America have improved, but they aren't always good. This assessment was provided by Harvard Law School Professor Charles Ogletree, who spoke Thursday at the University at Buffalo.


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Cheap gas prices are making consumers happy at the pump, but not everyone is benefiting from the lower prices. New York’s counties, who impose a sales tax on gasoline, have lost over $200 million in revenues.


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Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Heritage Moments

Library of Congress; c. 1838 lithograph, based on a c. 1828 painting by Charles King Bird

Heritage Moments: Red Jacket vows ‘While I live, you will get no more lands of the Indians’

During the American Revolution, the Seneca Nation’s lands covered practically the entire Niagara Frontier. But by 1819, their territory had dwindled to five tracts covering only about 130 square miles. All along, the Seneca clan chief Red Jacket opposed the sales, as well as what he saw as other encroachments on Indian self-determination.
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Investigative Post

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Investigative Post: Decades later, state says Love Canal landfill poses risk to the public

State environmental officials insisted for decades that residents living on the North Tonawanda-Wheatfield border had nothing to fear from the Love Canal waste buried in a neighboring landfill. Then, last year, they declared the landfill a Superfund site, even after 80 truckloads of contaminated soil originally removed from Love Canal were hauled away. Residents, many of whom report serious illnesses, are understandably upset. Dan Telvock, with our partner Investigative Post, dug through documents and filed this report.
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