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NAACP leader anxious about Trump presidency

More African-Americans voted for Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump in November's election. That was especially true in Buffalo. So local leaders like the Reverend Mark Blue of the NAACP are anxious following Trump's inauguration.

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At the Golden Globe Awards this year, Meryl Streep received an honorary award for outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment. In her acceptance speech, she criticized then-President-elect Trump for mocking a reporter with a disability. Some applauded her comments, but others have reacted in a different way -- saying Hollywood has to take a look at its own acceptance of people with different abilities.


One of the chief arguments over the state budget will be whether to renew an income tax surcharge on New York’s wealthiest. The debate stands next to Governor Cuomo's push to create new initiatives, such as free tuition at state colleges and universities.


A Wisconsin town is getting a lot of attention these days -- on the issue of drinking water.

 

Waukesha lies outside the Great Lakes basin, but it has received permission to take water from Lake Michigan. Officials are still debating the impact of the precedent-setting decision – and a group of mayors is challenging the town’s action.

 

Meanwhile, Waukesha is moving full speed ahead.  


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The list of refreshments available at local movie theaters may be expanded soon.


The Buffalo Zoo

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19 hours ago
Photo courtesy of National Weather Service

Dense fog spread over much of the region Sunday morning. The National Weather Service warned motorists to slow down and be prepared for rapid changes in visibility. Conditions were expected to improve as the day goes on.

NAACP leader anxious about Trump presidency

19 hours ago

More African-Americans voted for Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump in November's election. That was especially true in Buffalo. So local leaders like the Reverend Mark Blue of the NAACP are anxious following Trump's inauguration.

WBFO News File Photo

Governor Andrew Cuomo unveiled a plan Saturday to require health insurers to cover medically necessary abortions and most forms of contraception at no cost.

Buffalo School Board member Larry Quinn says he will file a complaint against Board President Barbara Seals Nevergold for her failure to notify him of a secret meeting last Tuesday.

From Wendy Diina's Facebook page

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators participated in the Women's March in Washington Saturday that brought together all genders, ages and races. 

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A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

All this kid wanted for Christmas was to be at Trump's inauguration

Jan 20, 2017

People trickled onto the National Mall before sunset Thursday, many wearing red hats, stopping for photos at a fenced area with a clear view of the Capitol Building to the east and the Washington Monument to the west.

A young, bearded man holding a sign that said "Not my president" stepped up on a barrier wall.

The loose crowd burst into boos and cheers, almost by command. Some of them started bickering. Insulting each other.

And an eager boy in a black suit — and a red hat — called on his mom to look at the commotion.

The peaceful transition of American power will be witnessed by the world once again Friday. Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. That has brought jubilation in conservative America. For them, Trump's win is a sigh of relief, a repudiation of Barack Obama's America and a pause on the liberalization of the world's remaining superpower.

Just over 10 weeks after the idea was first proposed in a Facebook post, tens of thousands of protesters are heading to the nation's capital for the Women's March on Washington on Saturday.

Similar marches are planned in more than 600 other cities and towns around the world. But the largest is expected to take place in Washington, D.C., less than 24 hours into the presidency of Donald Trump.

President Obama gave his final press conference at the White House on Wednesday, just two days before Donald Trump's inauguration. He reflected on his time in office and looked toward the incoming administration, ultimately concluding, "At my core, I think we're going to be OK."

NPR's politics team, with help from editors and reporters across the newsroom, annotated his remarks.

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