Highlights

Jerry Urban / WBFO News

Mayor Brown celebrates 'strong' state of city, confirms Tops to open downtown

Saying the state of the City of Buffalo is "strong," Mayor Byron Brown looked back on accomplishments while announcing who will develop a highly-anticipated downtown grocery store.
Read More
Internet Photo / WBFO News

A guilty plea has been entered in a public works corruption case in Monroe County.

It's income tax season, both to gather the paperwork or e-file that tax return. On this week's edition of You & The Law, attorney Derek Wheeler talks about that paperwork and offers some advice to avoid tax scams.


File photo

There is something of a Constitutional confrontation underway between Washington and Erie County regarding recently-passed bans on microbeads in personal care products.


Jerry Urban / WBFO News

Saying the state of the City of Buffalo is "strong," Mayor Byron Brown looked back on accomplishments while announcing who will develop a highly-anticipated downtown grocery store.


Chris Caya WBFO News

Key Bank's proposed takeover of First Niagara is running into opposition from elected officials.

WBFO file photo by Eileen Buckley

The Rich Family Foundation has made a major donation to benefit education initiatives in Buffalo.  WBFO's Focus on Education Reporter Eileen Buckley says the Foundation is donating $500,000 to the Say Yes Buffalo Scholarship Fund.

On this first week of Black History Month, the bureau that promotes tourism locally is looking to stress the importance of Buffalo’s African American heritage.

More than 150-million people are expected to watch the Super Bowl this Sunday evening, as the  Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos vie for the Vince Lombardi Trophy.


WBFO News File Photo

A left leaning thank tank is out with its assessment of Governor Cuomo’s budget. They say there’s a lot to like and dislike about it.


Mike Desmond/wbfo news

After months of debate, Erie County legislators rejected a push to move bar closing hours back from 4 a.m. to 2 a.m.


Pages

Now Playing

NPR News

Living on Earth: February 5, 2016

1 hour ago

Great Bear Rainforest Protected From Massive Logging / Beyond the Headlines / A Novel Way to Capture and Release the Warmth of the Sun / What's New for Electric Cars / A Vision to End the Hassle of Urban Parking

Looking for parking in a city is frustrating for the driver, and bad for the climate as circling cars emit unnecessary carbon dioxide. But as reporter Clive Thompson tells host Steve Curwood, fleets of coordinated, self-driving cars could bring an end to parking as we know it and help make our future cheaper, as well as more efficient, pleasant and green. (published February 5, 2016)

Beyond the Headlines

1 hour ago

Peter Dykstra shares some good news this week with host Steve Curwood. There are large reductions in air pollution costs and less toxins in fish. They also look back at Donald Trump’s battle against Scottish wind power. (published February 5, 2016)

Eighty-five percent of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia is now protected from logging, after decades of negotiations among environmental activists, the timber industry, First Nations, and the BC government. Temperate rainforests are one of the most rare ecosystems on Earth.Host Steve Curwood discusses how these groups came together with reporter Andrew MacLeod of the magazine The Tyee, who explains what’s been protected and what’s open for logging. (published February 5, 2016)

Storing solar energy is an enduring challenge for scientists, but now a team of MIT researchers has developed a new material that can trap it and release it as heat on demand. Host Steve Curwood visits the MIT lab to hear from postdoc David Zhitomirsky and graduate student Eugene Cho about their material and how it might be used to do such things as defrost windshields and warm our clothes. (published February 5, 2016)

Follow Us On Social Media

Heritage Moments

Library of Congress; c. 1838 lithograph, based on a c. 1828 painting by Charles King Bird

Heritage Moments: Red Jacket vows ‘While I live, you will get no more lands of the Indians’

During the American Revolution, the Seneca Nation’s lands covered practically the entire Niagara Frontier. But by 1819, their territory had dwindled to five tracts covering only about 130 square miles. All along, the Seneca clan chief Red Jacket opposed the sales, as well as what he saw as other encroachments on Indian self-determination.
Read More

Investigative Post

Dan Telvock

Press Pass: Pollution plagues Scajaquada Creek

Attention is now focused on the level of pollution in the Buffalo's Scajaquada Creek. "It's the only one (waterway) in the entire Niagara River Watershed where it's unfit for aquatic life," said Investigative Post's Dan Telvock during WBFO's Press Pass.
Read More