Highlights

Jerry Urban / WBFO News

Mayor Brown celebrates 'strong' state of city, confirms Tops to open downtown

Saying the state of the City of Buffalo is "strong," Mayor Byron Brown looked back on accomplishments while announcing who will develop a highly-anticipated downtown grocery store.
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Buffalo Bisons / milb.com

Former Buffalo Bisons manager Eric Wedge has been hired by the Toronto Blue Jays as the team's Player Development Advisor.

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Buffalo Police are investigating an early morning shooting not far from the University at Buffalo's South Campus.

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ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Authorities are investigating a robbery at an upstate New York college that's being called  racially motivated.

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Reform advocates, most voters and Governor Andrew Cuomo want to help clean up scandal-scarred Albany by prohibiting the state's 213 legislators from making serious money on the side.  But the most recent financial filings show most lawmakers already get by without substantial outside income.

Ontario job creation up by close to 20,000

3 hours ago

ONTARIO (CP) — Provincial Finance Minister Charles Sousa says most of the jobs being created in Ontario are good paying, full-time positions.

Internet Photo / WBFO News

A guilty plea has been entered in a public works corruption case in Monroe County.

It's income tax season, both to gather the paperwork or e-file that tax return. On this week's edition of You & The Law, attorney Derek Wheeler talks about that paperwork and offers some advice to avoid tax scams.


File photo

There is something of a Constitutional confrontation underway between Washington and Erie County regarding recently-passed bans on microbeads in personal care products.


Jerry Urban / WBFO News

Saying the state of the City of Buffalo is "strong," Mayor Byron Brown looked back on accomplishments while announcing who will develop a highly-anticipated downtown grocery store.


Chris Caya WBFO News

Key Bank's proposed takeover of First Niagara is running into opposition from elected officials.

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With February comes Black History Month in the U.S., a time designated to reflect on the history and contributions of people of African descent in this country. And while the month may invite debate among some, one thing rarely does in the U.S.: the idea of calling oneself, or being described as, black or African-American.

Can a kid succeed in school with only a mobile device for Internet access at home?

Lorena Uribe doesn't have to think about that one:

"Absolutely not," she says.

When her old computer broke down several years ago, she and her teenage daughter found themselves in a bind for about five months: homework to do and no computer or broadband access at home.

"I would take her to the mall and have her sit in Panera so she could use the Wi-Fi on her iPad from school," Uribe says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Looking for parking in a city is frustrating for the driver, and bad for the climate as circling cars emit unnecessary carbon dioxide. But as reporter Clive Thompson tells host Steve Curwood, fleets of coordinated, self-driving cars could bring an end to parking as we know it and help make our future cheaper, as well as more efficient, pleasant and green. (published February 5, 2016)

Eighty-five percent of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia is now protected from logging, after decades of negotiations among environmental activists, the timber industry, First Nations, and the BC government. Temperate rainforests are one of the most rare ecosystems on Earth.Host Steve Curwood discusses how these groups came together with reporter Andrew MacLeod of the magazine The Tyee, who explains what’s been protected and what’s open for logging. (published February 5, 2016)

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Heritage Moments

Library of Congress; c. 1838 lithograph, based on a c. 1828 painting by Charles King Bird

Heritage Moments: Red Jacket vows ‘While I live, you will get no more lands of the Indians’

During the American Revolution, the Seneca Nation’s lands covered practically the entire Niagara Frontier. But by 1819, their territory had dwindled to five tracts covering only about 130 square miles. All along, the Seneca clan chief Red Jacket opposed the sales, as well as what he saw as other encroachments on Indian self-determination.
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Investigative Post

Dan Telvock

Press Pass: Pollution plagues Scajaquada Creek

Attention is now focused on the level of pollution in the Buffalo's Scajaquada Creek. "It's the only one (waterway) in the entire Niagara River Watershed where it's unfit for aquatic life," said Investigative Post's Dan Telvock during WBFO's Press Pass.
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