Highlights

WBFO News file photo by Eileen Buckley

State of University highlights: Affordability, college completion and new foundation

SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher delivered her final State of the University Address Monday in Albany. WBFO's Senior Reporter Eileen Buckley says she highlighted progress made by SUNY in the past decade.

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WBFO News file photo by Avery Schneider

Buffalo School Board member Larry Quinn says he will file a complaint against Board President Barbara Seals Nevergold for her failure to notify him of a secret meeting last Tuesday.

From Wendy Diina's Facebook page

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators participated in the Women's March in Washington Saturday that brought together all genders, ages and races. 

Just minutes after President Donald J. Trump took the oath of office Friday morning, changes began to take place -- starting with the government's website. The page dedicated to climate change was one of many revisions on whitehouse.gov.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

On the day Donald Trump officially became the 45th President of the United States of America, numerous venues in Western New York hosted events to mark Inauguration Day.

Photo from Jessica Laursen

College students from Western New York traveled to Washington, D.C. to attend the Inauguration of President Donald Trump. WBFO's senior reporter Eileen Buckley says the trip is used as a learning experience for students.  

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

Local congressmen offer thoughts on Inauguration Day

Jan 20, 2017
NPR via Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Two Western New York Republican members of Congress are among those looking forward with excitement to today's inauguration of Donald Trump, the 45th President of the United States of America. Meanwhile, while many Democrats have indicated they'll skip the proceedings, one Buffalo-area Democrat says he'll be there.


Follow NPR's live blog of Inauguration Day for news highlights, analysis, photos and videos from Washington, D.C., throughout the day.

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A City of Tonawanda man has been sentenced to 2-4 years in prison for his role in a deadly boat crash on Ellicott Creek in June of 2015.

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Cafeteria Chats

Students face a lot of challenges in today’s schools. What better place to find out about them than in the cafeteria? Join WBFO's Eileen Buckley and Western New York students for Cafeteria Chats.

Heritage Moments

Courtesy of WNED-TV/"Buffalo's First Ward"

Heritage Moments: The hero policeman of Blizzard of '77

The Blizzard of 1977 took 31 lives in Western New York and the Niagara Peninsula, the most vicious, relentless and paralyzing storm in the living memory of a place often battered by brutal winter weather.

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NPR News

The Trump administration has moved into the White House, and that has Democrats looking toward the future. It may seem far away, but the 2018 midterm elections are just around the corner, and Democrats are hoping they can regain seats.

Nathan Gonzales (@nathanlgonzales), editor and publisher of “Inside Elections with Nathan Gonzales,” joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to talk about the 2018 Senate race.

From the emoluments clause to the Trump Foundation to his Washington hotel, many questions remain about President Donald Trump’s business ventures and how they’ll intersect with his new role as president.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax (@geewaxnpr) about some of Trump’s ongoing potential conflicts of interest as the new administration begins.

Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET

As the Women's March on Washington has swelled in support, attracting attention and supporters in the lead-up to Saturday's demonstrations, its name has become something of a misnomer.

Sister marches have been organized in all 50 states, several U.S. territories and countries around the world. They have tried to express solidarity with the aims of the original march: opposition to President Trump's agenda, and support of women's rights and human rights in general.

Making good on his promise to get started on "Day 1," President Trump and his administration got right to work on Friday, taking steps to dismantle the Affordable Care Act and announcing the reversal of their predecessors' plans to reduce mortgage insurance premiums on federally insured home loans.

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

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