Highlights

Chris Caya WBFO News

Community input sought to revive 998 Broadway

For many local residents 998 Broadway is synonymous with the former Sattler's Department store. After closing in the early 1980s the old building was demolished to make way for a big box retailer. But it also closed and the site across from the Broadway Market's been vacant for more than a dozen years. Now a design competition is underway that could help breath new life in to the property on Buffalo's East Side.

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Buffalo, NY – State Assemblyman Sam Hoyt is calling on Governor Pataki to instruct his appointees on the NFTA Board of Commissioners to reject a proposed fare increase for Metro Bus and Rail.

Assembly Hoyt says the governor promised New York City residents in December that he would do what he can to stop proposed rate hikes for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Pataki is quoted as saying the fare increase would be the "wrong thing to do" as the New York City continues to recover from September 11th.

Buffalo, NY – The Buffalo Building and Construction Trades Council rallied outside the Tri-Main Building in Buffalo Friday. Inside, representatives from Erie County were meeting with the non-union shop, Merit Construction Alliance, and construction manager, Ciminelli Cowper, about the county courthouse renovation project.

Trades president Dan Boody says he believes they were also discussing the disadvantages of a Project Labor Agreement.

Philadelphia, Here I Come!

Buffalo, NY – Jim Santella and Anthony Chase review "Philadelphia Here I Come" at the Irish Classical Theatre, plus "Noises Off" on Broadway and in Buffalo

The New York Times has written of Carl Dennis' poetry that it is "wise, original and often deeply moving." Dennis, an award winning UB English professor, now has eight collections of poetry. His new one is titled "Practical Gods."

Hamburg, NY – A massive restructuring effort by Ford Motor Company will cut 35,000 jobs worldwide. In North America, 22,000 Ford workers are being cut.

Buffalo, NY – Catholic Charities is looking for a few more heroes. The Diocese of Buffalo kicked off its 2002 appeal Thursday, "Be a Hero, Give Hope." This year's goal is a record $10 million.

It's been a tough year by any standard. The economy, already weakened by recession, was sent reeling after September 11th. And that has led to many more people in need of financial and crisis assistance. Bishop Henry Mansell says the numbers are up in some areas nearly four-fold. But the Bishop says this is not an appeal about numbers.

Buffalo, NY – There was some better news from the Buffalo Board of Education Wednesday night. School leaders say they've managed to reduce the number of planned layoffs and close the $28 million budget gap.

"There isn't a penny anywhere that we haven't been able to scrap together and be able to maximize," Schools Superintendent Marion Canedo said. She was pleased to report that they were able to reduce the number of planned teacher layoffs from 433 to 212.

Buffalo, NY – In 1876, Frederick Law Olmsted bragged about Buffalo, calling it "the best planned city as to its streets, public places and grounds in the United States - if not the world." But he might have withrawn that praise if he'd been around to witness the "urban renewal" that took place here in the mid 1950s. In recent years, the debate has resurfaced about how - or if - to restore Olmsted's vision. Wednesday night, the first of three public hearings was held on a proposed redesign of the Scajaquada Expressway.

Buffalo, NY – Roswell Park Cancer Institute says its effort to recruit clinical and scientific talent for its research center was a big success.

Dr. David Hohn, president and CEO of Roswell Park, introduced more than 40 new physicians, scientists and senior staffers recently hired. Hohn says they've come from other countries, Japan and United Kingdom, as well as from California, Texas, Boston and Maine.

"With funding, an excellent facility and a talented staff, this kind of recruitment can be done in Buffalo," Hohn said.

Amherst, NY – The landmark $26.5 billion dollar education bill was signed into law Tuesday by President Bush. And U.S. Congressman Tom Reynolds took the opportunity to explain the new law to a group of government honors students yesterday at Amherst Central High School. But if the congressman had been graded on his presentation he might have received an incomplete.

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Featuring co-headliners Joanna Connor and Tas Cru and the Tortured Souls and opening act Hanna and the Blue Hearts.

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Meredith Corp. said Sunday it has reached a "definitive agreement" to sell Time magazine to Salesforce founder and tech billionaire Marc Benioff and his wife Lynne Benioff for $190 million.

The deal, first reported by The Wall Street Journal, comes almost eight months after Meredith finalized its purchase of Time Inc.

Many healthy Americans take a baby aspirin every day to reduce their risk of having a heart attack, getting cancer and even possibly dementia. But is itreally a good idea?

Results released Sunday from a major study of low-dose aspirin contain a disappointing answer for older, otherwise healthy people.

Toronto has been called the "raccoon capital of the world."

Typhoon Mangkhut began to lash southern China on Sunday, the latest stop along a destructive path that has left dozens dead and many missing.

At least 64 people have died in the Philippines, according to The Associated Press. Two people were reported killed in China's Guangdong province, according to Chinese state media.

Watching an infant propel herself across the floor on wheels in a saucer-shaped baby walker may be as entertaining as a comedy episode. But because hospital emergency rooms treat more than 2,000 babies a year for injuries while using these walkers, American pediatricians are repeating their decades-old call for a ban.

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Heritage Moments

Still image from the documentary “William Kuntsler: Disturbing the Universe”, POV on PBS

Heritage Moments: The Attica Prison Uprising — 43 dead and a four-decade cover-up

The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 is one of the most disturbing episodes in the history of New York State and, indeed, the nation as a whole. It lasted four days, cost the lives of 43 persons and damaged the lives of hundreds of others, and what happened in the weeks before and the decades after only magnifies the horror. The repercussions of the uprising, the brutality the state used to put it down, the cover-up that followed – all of it continues to reverberate today.

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