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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Who's better off in Erie's changing economy?

20 hours ago

President Trump pledged sweeping political and economic changes during the campaign. We have no idea if Trump can deliver on those promises, but we can explore what it’s going to take for him to try. It’s all in our series The Big Promise.

Make your way through the maze of seeking asylum in the US

20 hours ago

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From PRI's The World ©2017 PRI

As high school students who survived the shooting in Parkland, Fla., travel to the state Capitol to demand action on guns, lawmakers offered a glimpse of the battle they face.

In Tuesday's session, which opened with prayer for the community of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students and staff were killed last week, Florida House lawmakers declined to open debate on a bill that would ban assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines.

Why low unemployment might not lead to higher inflation

22 hours ago

Our ideas about the relationship between the unemployment rate and inflation may be all wrong. 

The latest jobs report revealed that the unemployment rate is at 4.1 percent for a fourth straight month — the lowest level since 2000. But that means that the economy may be heating up, which also means that the Federal Reserve may want to put the brakes on that by raising interest rates.

(Markets Edition) The group at the Federal Reserve that makes key decisions about interest rates is getting ready to release minutes from its latest meeting. We'll talk with Susan Schmidt — senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group — about some of the factors that may influence them. Next, we'll look at how Texas funds its higher education system, and then discuss the harsh conditions that builders have to face in the winter.

Texas legislature taking on college costs

Feb 21, 2018

A panel of Texas lawmakers meets Wednesday to take a look at how the state funds higher education each year. Legislatures across the country — who all face rising costs of higher ed and are trying to contain tuition hikes — will be watching for portable solutions that might work in other states.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

For people who work indoors, snow, ice, and subfreezing temperatures are often nothing more than an inconvenience. But for construction companies and their employees, harsh winter weather can be something more — a financial and physical hazard.

Cities across the country — from large urban areas like Chicago to smaller ones like Cleveland — are in the midst of a multiyear building boom, with developers racing to meet pent-up demand for housing and office space. And with billions of dollars in play and deadlines to meet, the work rarely stops even when the weather turns ice cold.

02/21/2018: Parkland, Florida students mobilize

Feb 21, 2018

(U.S. Edition) A group of survivors from the Parkland, Florida mass shooting last week are lobbying for gun control laws, and they're getting a lot of financial support. We'll take a look at some of the steps they've taken to mobilize, along with some of the donors who are supporting the cause. Afterwards, we'll examine the criteria Texas uses to fund its colleges and universities, and then we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about why he thinks there was that big drop in markets earlier this month. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The world’s biggest mining companies are seeing a boost to their bottom lines thanks to rising global commodity prices. We’ll tell you how the battery revolution is helping shape the overall market. Then, India is opening up its coal industry, allowing foreign companies to bid for coal mines in the country. But will more investment from some of the world’s biggest companies translate into better quality of life for residents there? Afterward, a conversation about whether growing use of artificial intelligence presents a looming danger. 

Good luck watching the Winter Games in 4K

Feb 21, 2018

Watching the Winter Olympics on your phone is great and all, but if you’ve spent a pretty penny on an ultra-high-definition TV, an iPhone probably won’t cut it. How, then, does one watch the winter games in glorious 4K? Well, it’s complicated. NBC is delivering 4K video of some events the day after they air, but that video is difficult to access even with the right TV and set top box.

Watching the Olympics on your phone is great and all, but if you’ve spent a pretty penny on an ultra-high-definition TV, an iPhone probably won’t cut it. How, then, does one watch the winter games in glorious 4K? Well, it’s complicated. NBC is delivering 4K video of some events the day after they air, but that video is difficult to access even with the right TV and set-top box. Sam Machkovech wrote about this problem for Ars Technica. He spoke with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood about the Olympic 4K rigmarole.  

The U.S. men's hockey team narrowly lost to the Czech Republic in a tight quarterfinal game that ended in a penalty shootout at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics tournament on Wednesday.

The final score was 3-2, after the Americans were unable to get the puck past Czech goalie Pavel Francouz. In the five-round shootout, only one player managed to score: Petr Koukal of the Czech Republic.

With the win, the undefeated Czech Republic team advances to the semifinals in the Olympics tournament. The Czechs outshot the Americans 29-20 in their game at the Gangneung Hockey Center.

The report of an independent two-month investigation into how NPR's management handled allegations of sexual harassment by Michael Oreskes, the former Senior Vice President of News who was forced to resign Nov.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

Following the deadly school shooting in Florida on Feb. 14, President Trump is directing the Department of Justice to develop regulations to ban bump stocks.

"Just a few moments ago I signed a memorandum directing the AG to propose regulations to ban all devices that turn legal weapons into machine guns. I expect that these critical regulations will be finalized, Jeff, very soon," Trump said, referring to Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

NPR's "Take A Number" series is exploring problems around the world — and solutions — through the lens of a single number.

One of the places many people are first prescribed opioids is a hospital emergency room. But in one of the busiest ERs in the U.S., doctors are relying less than they used to on oxycodone, Percocet, Vicodin and other opioids to ease patients' pain.

The Trump administration wants to allow insurance companies to offer more policies that have limited health benefits and that can reject customers if they have pre-existing medical conditions.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar says the plans, which don't meet the legal requirements for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, will allow consumers who can't afford insurance now to find cheaper plans.

Should credit card companies tackle gun sales?

Feb 20, 2018

Andrew Ross Sorkin had an interesting column in the New York Times yesterday — a business and economic take on how to make mass shootings less common. PayPal and Square, Sorkin pointed out, decided years ago not to let people use their services to buy guns. What about Mastercard and Visa, he wondered. Or the big banks that issue credit cards? Why can't — or won't — they do the same?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The turf war over taxes

Feb 20, 2018

New polling shows that public sentiment is growing more favorable toward the recent tax law. Maybe chalk that up to the little extra money many people are seeing in their paychecks as a result of new tax brackets. But in Washington, D.C., there's still a fight going on about the new tax code — specifically, how to interpret it. It's between the IRS, a bureau of the Treasury Department, and the White House Office of Management and Budget.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

An outside legal review of NPR's handling of allegations against its former top news executive, Michael Oreskes, found that questions were raised about his behavior toward women even before he was hired. And concerns about misconduct were reportedly flagged throughout Oreskes' 2 1/2-year tenure at the network right up to the day he was fired.

Botanist David Fairchild grew up in Kansas at the end of the 19th century. He loved plants, and he loved travel, and he found a way to combine both into a job for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Can Elon Musk deliver on Tesla's Model 3s?

Feb 20, 2018

There are a handful of electric cars that are all somewhat in the same price range: the Chevy Bolt ($36k), the Nissan LEAF ($30k) and Tesla's Model 3, Elon Musk's flagship electric vehicle, priced at around $35,000. But in a classic tale of highly popular, very rare consumer goods, the Tesla Model 3 has got to be the most famous.

52: Rahm Remixed

Feb 20, 2018

Rahm Emanuel likes to talk. The two-term mayor of Chicago and former White House chief of staff to President Barack Obama spoke with us at length about everything from populism to immigration. He told us that Chicago is a "welcoming" city, not a sanctuary city. He's got a special chair. And he's got some sharp words for "Mr. Moody's Doom and Gloom," otherwise known as Kai Ryssdal. Plus, Emanuel takes the longest pause ever to answer our Make Me Smart Question. 

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Satisfied with Trump in rural Pennsylvania

Feb 20, 2018

President Trump pledged sweeping political and economic changes during the campaign. We have no idea if Trump can deliver on those promises, but we can explore what it’s going to take for him to try. It’s all in our series The Big Promise.

Growing up in rural Idaho, Tara Westover had no birth certificate, never saw a doctor and didn't go to school. Her parents were religious fundamentalists who stockpiled food, mistrusted the government and believed in strict gender roles for their seven children.

As a girl, Westover says, "There wasn't ever any question about what my future would look like: I would get married when I was 17 or 18, and I would be given some corner of the farm and my husband would put a house on it and we would have kids."

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