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A Missouri judge ruled on Tuesday that state election officials can no longer tell voters they must show a photo ID in order to cast a ballot. The ruling blocks part of Missouri's voter identification law.

Cole County's Judge Richard Callahan said the state cannot advertise that a photo identification is required to cast a ballot. "No compelling state interest is served by misleading local election authorities and voters into believing a photo ID card is a requirement for voting," he wrote in his ruling.

Doctors have gradually come to realize that people who survive a serious brush with death in the intensive care unit are likely to develop potentially serious problems with their memory and thinking processes.

This dementia, a side effect of intensive medical care, can be permanent. And it affects as many as half of all people who are rushed to the ICU after a medical emergency. Considering that 5.7 million Americans end up in intensive care every year, this is a major problem that until recently, has been poorly appreciated by medical caregivers.

The end of the fight over Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination sets up a new battleground over abortion rights, and activists on both sides of the issue are gearing up for what's likely to be a series of contentious battles from the high court to state legislatures.

In the basement of a suburban Philadelphia home, half a dozen high school freshman boys recently met to munch on chips and pretzels — and to talk about sexual assault in the wake of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings.

A Jewish organization called Moving Traditions brought them together as part of its programs to encourage teenagers to talk about this and other difficult issues.

IMF forecasts slower global growth

Oct 9, 2018

The International Monetary Fund said Tuesday it's shaving off some of its earlier optimism about world economic growth over the next couple years. It has downgraded its growth forecast for this year from 3.9 percent to 3.7 percent, and for next year, the IMF has ticked the world's growth down from 2.7 percent to 2.5 percent. The forecast took some of the wind out of U.S. and Chinese economic expansion, too, saying both countries would grow more slowly than previously thought. So what could be dragging us down in a year's time?

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Goodbye, Google+ — We Forgot You Existed

Oct 9, 2018

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This week, Google disclosed a data breach, one that potentially affected hundreds of thousands of users. It was on the company's social media platform Google+.

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For 50 years, an archive in Nashville has meticulously recorded the national evening news.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "ABC WORLD NEWS TONIGHT")

It's been a year since the The New York Times ran an exposé alleging sexual harassment by Hollywood executive Harvey Weinstein. That led to an outpouring of allegations as others spoke out, leading to the downfall of many leaders and executives, including top news editors at NPR.

R.I.P., Google Plus

Oct 9, 2018

We hardly used ye. Google is phasing out its social platform Google Plus after a massive data breach. We look at how this could affect Google’s business model. Also on today's show, the International Monetary Fund predicted in its global economic forecast that trade disputes and turbulent emerging markets will slow global economic growth. And, are electric scooters all that bad, or are they a sign of where our transportation system is headed? A report on the electric scooter craze from Los Angeles.

Credit card interest rates are rising

Oct 9, 2018

A report out today from Creditcards.com shows that credit card interest rates are on the rise. The average rate is just over 17 percent, up from about 16.15 percent this time last year and 15.22 percent in 2016.

The reason? The Federal Reserve has been hiking interest rates since 2015. That means banks have been paying more to borrow money, and they’re passing that cost on to their customers, including credit card borrowers, said Lucia Dunn, professor emeritus at Ohio State University.

Everyone is familiar with the official film genres, like the Western or the romantic comedy. But most of us divide movies into less intellectual categories.

There are movies that everybody has to see, like A Star is Born. There are movies you couldn't pay me to see; in my case, that's anything with the word "Saw" in its title. And then there are movies we know we ought to see but dread having to go.

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85: Expl4inathon

Oct 9, 2018

It's time for another Explainathon, the biannual tradition when we put Kai and Molly to the test: In 30 minutes, they'll try to answer as many of your questions as possible. It's going to be tough, because this might just be our widest-ranging 'thon yet: Gamers! Trade wars! Gas prices! Bots on the trading floor! Plus, Kai and Molly will try to stump each other.

Coin-operated gumball machines aren't as common as they used to be. With sales slowly dwindling over the years and high domestic sugar prices, America's sole remaining gumball maker has been branching out to stay afloat.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Markets Edition) New numbers show the benefits of aggressively helping young people finish school and find jobs. A study followed two groups, both ages 16 to 24, on their journeys. Then we dive into the markets, where the latter half of this week signals the beginning of a new season of sorts for market participants. Also, we check in on the last American gumball company standing, Ford Gum and Machine Company, which has been around for more than a century.

Updated 4:55 p.m. ET

Nikki Haley is resigning as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and will leave the Trump administration at the end of the year, she said Tuesday.

It is not immediately clear what prompted the move. She informed her staff Tuesday, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

Haley appeared with President Trump on Tuesday morning at the Oval Office, where he called her a "fantastic person" and said Haley had told him six months ago that she might take time off at the end of the year.

A Wall Street Journal report finds that the private information of nearly half a million Google users was vulnerable from 2015 to March 2018.

Ask a Manager: Should we talk politics at work?

Oct 9, 2018

Watercooler chit chat isn’t always captivating: Martha’s got a new cat, traffic really was terrible today and Garrett wants to explain the difference between bouldering and top roping, again. But conversations at the watercooler don’t always stay cool. Talking politics at work can heat things up very fast. With the midterms less than a month out, it might seem impossible to avoid.

(U.S. Edition) A new report details how the private information of almost half a million Google users was exposed to hackers until Google sealed up the leak in the spring. The apparent weak link was Google Plus, so we take a look at the data vulnerabilities that can occur when a platform fades into oblivion. Then, we check the global economic pulse with new data from the International Monetary Fund.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The IMF has downgraded its view of global growth due in part to ongoing trade tensions. We’ll hear from the organization’s chief economist. Then, after a month of speculation, Pakistan put rumors to rest and said it will seek a bailout from the International Monetary Fund to tackle its mounting balance of payments crisis. We’ll hear from our reporter on the ground in Islamabad.  Afterwards, Korean pop band BTS has stepped in to fill the boy-band vacuum, igniting a wave of excitement around the globe with its “Love Yourself” world tour.

Updated at 2:00 a.m. ET Wednesday

Hurricane Michael has grown into a Category 4 hurricane, with sustained winds reaching 130 mph, as it barrels toward northwestern Florida, making it a much stronger storm than Hurricane Florence was when it made landfall as a Category 1 storm drenching the Carolinas last month, according to the National Hurricane Center.

A report last week from Bloomberg Businessweek suggested that Chinese spies had embedded tiny microchips on motherboards that control computers in order to steal information from nearly 30 U.S. companies, including Apple and Amazon. Both of those companies, and Super Micro, the electronics maker that was allegedly infiltrated, and the Chinese government have categorically denied the report. But the story is lingering, in part because it brings up a very scary reality that lots of cybersecurity experts keep talking about. Molly Wood talks about it with cybersecurity expert Bruce Schneier.

A report last week from Bloomberg Businessweek suggested that Chinese spies had embedded tiny little microchips on motherboards that control computers in order to steal information from nearly 30 U.S. companies, including Apple and Amazon. Both of those companies, and Super Micro Computer Inc., the electronics maker that was allegedly infiltrated have categorically denied the report.

The stretch limousine involved in a deadly crash in upstate New York on Saturday had recently failed a state safety inspection and its driver did not have the proper license to drive the vehicle, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday.

The crash killed all 18 occupants of the modified limo and two pedestrians. Federal officials said it is the deadliest transportation accident in the U.S. since a 2009 plane crash.

Television producing legend Norman Lear has a long list of credits that include “All in the Family,” “Sanford and Son,” “The Jeffersons,” “Good Times” and “Maude.” Forty-five years after creating some of the most iconic sitcoms in American history, Lear is still making television, with a re-make of “One Day at a Time” recently airing on Netflix.

The fields and back roads of eastern Arkansas were a crime scene this past summer. State inspectors stopped alongside fields to pick up dying weeds. They tested the liquids in farmers' pesticide sprayers. In many cases, they found evidence that farmers were using a banned pesticide. Dozens of farmers could face thousands of dollars in fines.

Updated at 9:20 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court welcomes its newest justice Tuesday as Brett Kavanaugh takes the bench for his first arguments since a contentious Senate voted narrowly to confirm him, cementing a decades-long campaign by conservatives to reshape the nation's highest court.

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