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Starbucks is closing thousands of stores across the U.S. on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct "racial-bias education geared toward preventing discrimination in our stores," the company said in a statement.

To Prevent Falls In Older Age, Try Regular Exercise

Apr 18, 2018

Falls are a leading cause of injury and death among older adults. In 2014, about 1 in 3 adults aged 65 and older reported falling, and falls were linked to 33,000 deaths.

If you want to reduce the risk of falling, regular exercise may be your best bet, according to the latest recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Arizona has become the first state in the country to pass a law that would allow frozen embryos to be given to the person who wants to develop them “to birth” after a couple separates or divorces.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins speaks with Nita Farahany (@NitaFarahany), professor of law and philosophy at Duke University, to consider the legal and ethical implications.

States are continuing to do battle with budget-busting prices of prescription drugs. But a recent federal court decision could limit the tools available to them — underscoring the challenge states face as, in the absence of federal action, they attempt on their own to take on the powerful drug industry.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Former First Lady Barbara Bush Dies At 92

Apr 17, 2018

Updated at 10:23 p.m. ET

Former first lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday at the age of 92, according to a family spokesman.

A statement issued on Sunday by the office of former President George H.W. Bush said that Bush had elected to receive "comfort care" over additional medical treatment after a series of hospitalizations.

Barbara Bush’s literacy legacy

Apr 17, 2018

Former first lady Barbara Bush died today at home in Houston, Texas, according to a statement from her family. She was 92. Over the weekend, the wife of former President George H.W. Bush elected to forgo additional treatment for several health problems.

After the arrest of two black men who sat in a Philadelphia Starbucks without buying a drink, Starbucks is going through a public relations tailspin — and the company can't seem to say mea culpa fast enough.

CEO Kevin Johnson announced today that Starbucks would close its 8,000 company-owned stores on May 29 so that the approximately 175,000 employees could attend a day of bias training. But will that be the end of the company's attempts to restore its image?

Everyone gets another day to file their taxes after IRS site outage

Apr 17, 2018

Americans who waited until the last day to pay their taxes online got an unwelcome surprise: The IRS website to make payments and access other key services went down earlier today.

Now, taxpayers will get a one-day extension, and the filing system is back online.

IMF bumps up U.S. growth projections for 2018

Apr 17, 2018

The International Monetary Fund raised its growth target for the American economy today to 2.9 percent. That’s very close to the three percent forecast the Trump administration promised.  In a conversation about President Donald Trump's tax cuts and the overall state of the economy on Fox News this morning,  Trump's top economic adviser Larry Kudlow said we are starting to see "an economic boom.”

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal called up Kathy Bostjancic, the chief U.S. financial markets economist at Oxford Economics to get some context on the economic growth projections.

Desiree Linden became the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since 1985 — finishing 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 39 minutes and 54 seconds on Monday.

The 34-year-old two-time Olympian lives in Michigan, and she finished second at the Boston Marathon in 2011. But her victory this week almost didn't happen.

In the cold rain and wind, Linden says she wasn't feeling well and thought about bailing out of the race.

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Restaurants say diners are bad at making reservations

Apr 17, 2018

When you try to reserve a table at a restaurant, you make a call or click a button online. But on the restaurant side, things could get messy and complicated. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke to journalist Marissa Conrad about her story  on why diners are bad at making restaurant reservations and how restaurants are trying to change that.

59: Adam ruins our show

Apr 17, 2018

What does the sketch comedy TV show "Adam Ruins Everything" have in common with our podcast? Well, we kinda share the same mission. In his TruTV show, live tours and podcast, comedian Adam Conover takes on topics we think we know about — like dieting, going green, taxes and, uh, circumcision — then punctures our assumptions with facts and comedy. We learn about his process, whether he actually changes minds and truth-squadding in the age of alternative facts. But first we chat about our own news fixations, like who bought divisive digital ads, Beyoncé and currency manipulation.

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A warning about the next four minutes - we're going to examine a grisly, tragic crime in northern India, one that also touches upon larger issues in that country. It's the story about the rape and murder of an 8-year-old girl.

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show.

Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84.

It's been almost a year since since James Comey first learned that President Trump had fired him. The former FBI director was in Los Angeles visiting the field office for a diversity event when a ticker announcing his ouster scrolled across the bottom of a TV screen.

"I thought it was a scam," Comey says. "I went back to talking to the people who were gathered in front of me."

At least once a week, Reynald Justance visits a small, fairly inconspicuous office building on Orlando’s west side. The building, located across from a shopping plaza, is unmarked, except for a yellow sign by its door that reads in French: Authorized CAM Agent Serving the Community. 

CAM, short for “Caribbean Air Mail,” is a popular wire service with agencies in Haitian beauty salons, bakeries, shopping plazas — and office buildings.  

(Markets Edition) Starting today, the Supreme Court will hear a case on whether out-of-state businesses should pay South Dakota state and local taxes if they ship a product to a state. We'll take a brief look at the advantage online retailers have in not charging sales taxes, and why Amazon might actually be at a disadvantage here. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report showing that we're not building new homes fast enough to meet demand in 22 states.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, fired FBI Director James Comey defended his controversial decisions during the 2016 campaign and asserted that the reputation of his agency — which operates under near daily siege from the president and his allies — "would be worse today had we not picked the least bad alternatives."

"I saw this as a 500-year flood, and so where is the manual? What do I do?" he said.

Study finds housing shortages in 22 states

Apr 17, 2018

The Commerce Department reports March housing starts Tuesday, giving us a snapshot of new home construction. U.S. housing production is finally returning to pre-recession levels, but a new report underscores that we’re still not building new homes fast enough to meet demand in 22 states. And while much of that demand is in the state of California, other states outside of coastal areas are feeling shortages as well. So what might help fix that?

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Starbucks is now planning to make its managers undergo unconscious bias training. 

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe meets with President Donald Trump today at the president’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. Likely to be on tap: trade, tariffs and North Korea. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

(U.S. Edition) President Trump is blocking economic sanctions on Russia proposed by U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley. We'll recap what the sanctions included and the reason Haley wanted to impose them. Afterwards, as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe gets ready to meet Trump today, we'll discuss what might be on the agenda. Possible topics: The Trans-Pacific Partnership and planned U.S. tariffs on aluminum and steel.

Harry Anderson, an actor and magician featured on the TV shows Night Court, Dave's World and Cheers died Monday morning at age 65.

Police in Asheville, N.C., say officers responded to a call at Anderson's home and found him deceased. No foul play is suspected in his death.

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans reports for our Newscast unit:

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After years of debt binges, bail-outs and sluggish growth, the European economic recovery is gaining traction. Now, French President Emmanuel Macron has laid out his vision for the future of Europe in a major speech. Macron called on policymakers to defend democracy in the European Union and work harder to build up the eurozone's defenses against another economic meltdown. But with political deadlock in Italy and populism on the rise, is Macron’s grand plan destined to fail?

More than half of middle schools in the United States allow students to carry their phones, which filmmaker and Stanford-trained physician Delaney Ruston finds concerning.

The gig economy: It's not just for rides or rooms. It's also for taxes.

Apr 17, 2018

It's Tax Day, and if you, like me — and 50 million others — prepared your taxes online this year, you might have seen an option to talk to an accountant if you were having problems. This year, TurboTax includes a feature that lets you video chat with an accountant if you have a question.

"I mean, I get every kind of question,” said Jake Bakke, an accountant based in Denver. “Some of it has to do with where do I enter my W2 ... or the person might have incentive stock options and are trying to calculate the adjusted basis."

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