Angelica A. Morrison

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Angelica A. Morrison is a multimedia journalist with over a decade of experience in the field.

Angelica joined the WBFO-FM staff in April 2016 as the station’s Great Lakes Regional Journalism Collaborative reporter/project coordinator (RJC). The Great Lakes RJC covers a variety of issues, including environmental, economic and lifestyle, along the Great Lakes corridor.

Born and bred in upstate New York, Angelica has a passion for New York State and its inhabitants.  Angelica’s interest in journalism began to sprout in high school when she toured her hometown newspaper the Democrat and Chronicle.

Her adventures in journalism have taken her across the state. After graduating from Buffalo State College, she worked as a reporter for the Lockport Union Sun and Journal, then as a freelance writer for The Buffalo News.

Angelica then trekked across the state to Utica, New York where she worked for several years as a multimedia journalist and web producer for the Observer-Dispatch and then served as a news producer/web producer for the NBC affiliate WKTV News Channel 2.

Angelica returned to Buffalo in the spring of 2014. She reintroduced herself to the public as a freelance journalist for The Buffalo News and The Niagara Gazette.

Angelica’s interests include gardening, shopping, knitting, politics, Adirondack camping and gardening.

You can contact Angelica at amorrison@wbfo.org and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/amorrisonWBFO.

Graphic displaying oil transport through out the Great Lakes Region

Matthew Child, a scientist with the International Joint Commission, talks with Great Lakes Today's Angelica Morrison about the transporting oil throughout the Great Lakes region.

It’s day two of the Great Lakes Restoration Conference in Buffalo New York. Hundreds  are learning about problems that affect the lakes, including microplastics.


The Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Restoration Conference is under way this week, bringing attention to critical Great Lakes issues.


Niagara Falls, N.Y., has a messy problem -- it continues to dump sewage and discolored water downriver from the popular tourist attraction. The most recent incident happened Wednesday afternoon.


Several states, including a few in the Great Lakes region, have received a sizable chunk of money from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities. The funding is to increase protections in watershed areas.


A small island in the Niagara River has received a makeover, thanks to the New York State Power Authority and the state Department of Environmental Conservation.Angelica A. Morrison reports.

Lake Erie is a route for huge freighters carrying cargo to cities like Cleveland and Buffalo. Now a company wants to use the lake to transport another product: electricity.


The topic of sewage discharges is back in the spotlight again in Niagara Falls and surrounding areas.


Several water-related issues were the highlight of a report released today by a Western New York environmental group.


The US Department of Agriculture is asking residents along the Great Lakes corridor and beyond to watch out for an invader- the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB).


NIAGARA FALLS, NY - An environmental alert was issued by the New York State Alert system early Wednesday morning advising residents of a sewer discharge in the Niagara River near the popular American Falls.


More than 150 years ago, the Great Lakes region played a key role in the Underground Railroad. Runaway slaves made their way to cities along the lakes and crossed the border to freedom in Canada. Fast forward to today, when thousands of asylum seekers are passing up a chance to live in the U.S. – and are heading north too.


Updated Wednesday, Aug. 3

The recent black, odorous wastewater discharge near the base of Niagara Falls violated New York regulations, a state official says. But it's unclear whether any fines will result.


Invasive fish and plants that have plagued the Great Lakes region for decades are getting some special attention this week.


The National Wildlife Federation issued a statement in response to the recent discovery of an Asian Carp found just a few miles outside of Lake Michigan.

Angelica A. Morrison reports

A new report on the health of the Great Lakes is out this week, and it shows a grim outlook for Lake Erie.


Biologists with the USFWS work to monitor and track the progress of the Lake Sturgeon in the lower Niagara River.

Copyright 2017 Great Lakes Today. To see more, visit Great Lakes Today.

Final part of a series on President Trump's budget

On the shores of the lower Niagara River, about 10 miles from Niagara Falls, a group of biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepare to examine the largest fish species in the Great Lakes region – the lake sturgeon.


Jim Levulis, WAMC

The comeback of the American bald eagle is a success story across the Great Lakes region, and keeping them safe is a high priority for many environmental professionals. But one serious threat to the great raptor is lead poisoning.


An oil pipeline that runs across part of the Great Lakes has been the target of criticism for months. Now environmental groups in the region are applauding a move to toughen pipeline laws, and protect the fresh water source from potential oil spills.


Updated Friday, May 26, at 4:45 p.m.

The region braced for a long stretch of rain and showers -- weather that could contribute to more flooding.

The National Weather Service forecast calls for rain or a chance or showers every day through Thursday. 

And the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River board, which controls outflows from a big dam, says it be "several weeks" before the lake is significantly lower.

Concerns are growing that the historic structures at Old Fort Niagara could be at risk of damage from Lake Ontario's flood waters. The fort is located in New York at the mouth of the Niagara River, where it meets the lake.


As heavy rains continued along the southern shore of Lake Ontario, residents and government officials are growing concerned about waves that are eroding lakefront properties. They're also worried about damage to local utilities.

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day takes place Saturday, April 29, and New York Sea Grant is urging residents of the Great Lakes region to participate to help protect fish and wildlife. The organization says fish downstream from wastewater plants sometimes contain chemicals like estrogen from prescription drugs.

It’s important to know that the food you’re eating  is safe—especially when it comes to fish caught in polluted waters.


Rising levels on Lake Ontario have prompted officials in counties near Buffalo and Rochester to declare a state of emergency.

Officials said they expect higher than normal water levels over the next few days and into the weekend -- with a possibility of flooding.

Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper

It’s springtime and that means cleanup efforts are getting underway in various cities throughout the Great Lakes basin.


Eileen Koteras Elibol / WBFO NEWS

by Angelica A. Morrison / Great Lakes Today

On Tuesday, the International Joint Commission, a group that helps regulate the Great Lakes, is coming to Buffalo to listen to your concerns -- and discuss issues that are important to the Buffalo region.


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