Angelica A. Morrison

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Angelica A. Morrison is a multimedia journalist with over a decade of experience in the field.

Angelica joined the WBFO-FM staff in April 2016 as the station’s Great Lakes Regional Journalism Collaborative reporter/project coordinator (RJC). The Great Lakes RJC covers a variety of issues, including environmental, economic and lifestyle, along the Great Lakes corridor.

Born and bred in upstate New York, Angelica has a passion for New York State and its inhabitants. As a child she lived in rural Rochester with corn fields and cows for neighbors, then moved to a more urban environment on Buffalo’s west side and then back to Rochester (this time as a city dweller). Angelica’s interest in journalism began to sprout in high school when she toured her hometown newspaper the Democrat and Chronicle.

Her adventures in journalism have taken her across the state. After graduating from Buffalo State College, she worked as a reporter for the Lockport Union Sun and Journal, then as a freelance writer for The Buffalo News.

Angelica then trekked across the state to Utica, New York where she worked for several years as a multimedia journalist and web producer for the Observer-Dispatch and then served as a news producer/web producer for the NBC affiliate WKTV News Channel 2.

Angelica returned to Buffalo in the spring of 2014. She reintroduced herself to the public as a freelance journalist for The Buffalo News and The Niagara Gazette.

Angelica’s interests include gardening, eating, shopping, Internet binge watching (mostly Happy Days and Three’s Company on YouTube), knitting, politics, Adirondack camping, finance (researching ways to become a millionaire), loose leaf tea, Star Trek, Marvel Comics, buying local honey (along with other locally grown foods and produce), several gym memberships, free slushy day at 7-Eleven, flying kites, reading (or collecting books with the intention of reading them) and Groupon.

You can contact Angelica at amorrison@wbfo.org and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/amorrisonWBFO.

Great Lakes Today will host a Facebook Live event for the International Joint Commission's Buffalo public meeting on the health of the lakes.

Two sessions will take place March 28, and both will be streamed live on Facebook.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON / Lake Effect man on the handle of a beer tap at the Pearl Street Grill and Brewery in Buffalo New York.

Residents in the Great Lakes region are very familiar with Lake Effect snows. When cold, dry air passes over the lakes, it generates enough snow to bring white outs, vehicle pile ups, power outages and back-breaking shoveling. Despite all those problems, dozens of businesses and organizations have embraced the Lake Effect name.


Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department

Snowmobiling is a popular sport on New Hampshire’s Lake Potanipo. Riders like the wide open spaces. It isn’t unusual to see them set up makeshift roads and racetracks and zoom around the ice.

Residents in the Great Lakes region will get a chance to voice their concerns about the waters' health in a series of March meetings. The International Joint Commission, which helps regulate use of the Great Lakes, has announced dates and other details of meetings scheduled in Buffalo and five other cities.


Its 20 degrees on a frigid Saturday afternoon. Jennifer Nalbone is standing outside a small Western New York airport waiting for her father Lou.


Just minutes after President Donald J. Trump took the oath of office Friday morning, changes began to take place -- starting with the government's website. The page dedicated to climate change was one of many revisions on whitehouse.gov.

International Joint Commission / International Joint Commission

The International Joint Commission will hold a public hearing at the WNED|WBFO studios on March 28, as part of an effort to gather comments on its draft progress report for the Great Lakes region.

Helen Domske is the senior coastal education specialist for New York Sea Grant and associate director of the University at Buffalo's Great Lakes Program. She's also an avid scuba diver, so we asked her about diving in the Great Lakes.

Environmentalists in Canada are taking a close look at water quality, and a new study by the Lake Ontario Waterkeeper highlights some serious problems.

NEW YORK POWER AUTHORITY PHOTO /Ice boom installation 2015.

After several days of tough winter weather, crews finished up the installation of the Lake Erie/Niagara River Ice Boom Thursday.

Climate change is an issue of concern for many around the world. Scientists say the signs are everywhere. Here in the Great Lakes region, the evidence of regional climate change can be seen in every day.


Mark Mattson, the president of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper and Swim Drink Fish Canada, has advice for keeping waters clean and safe.

The holiday season can be a happy time for many. But it may cause trouble for the environment.


The deep freeze has arrived in Great Lakes states and that means one thing: It's time for the Lake Erie/Niagara River Ice Boom.


Every year, hundreds of volunteers work to clear plastic bags and other garbage from areas along the Great Lakes and its tributaries.


The political waters remain murky regarding the topic of climate change – after president-elect Donald Trump’s flip-flopping on the issue.


Meet the man who turned off the American Falls.

Col. Amos Wright is a retired US Army solider and engineer.  He and his wife Gloria live in Provo, Utah, where he spends time perfecting his golf game.


Parks officials in New York are planning a project of historic significance: temporarily shutting off the American Falls.

That will dramatically alter a natural wonder that attracts millions of tourists from around the world.

The Great Lakes Commission created a web tool designed to prevent sales of aquatic invasive species over the Internet. Now, the commission is working to get it into the hands of state and federal regulators.


The problem of storm water overflows has been a sore spot for many communities across the Great Lakes. Here in Erie County, the issue was on the table during a panel discussion about Green Infrastructure in the Buffalo-Niagara Region.

by Angelica A. Morrison / Seneca Bluff Buffalo

Efforts toward Great Lakes habitat restoration continue, as a ground breaking ceremony took place for a new local project Friday in South Buffalo.

Split pea soup – that’s how some folks describe the Great Lakes back when it was plagued by contamination, pollution and algae. A lot has changed since then.


by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

Environmental groups are continuing their work to revive habitats along the Great Lakes corridor.

The issue of storm water runoff has plagued waterways in Great Lakes states for years. Areas like Toronto on Lake Ontario, the Buffalo River in Western New York and the Maumee River in Ohio are just a few examples.


Big changes are on the horizon for the western end of Lake Erie.

It's the nation's very first fresh water wind farm. The project known as Icebreaker, consists of six wind turbines located 8 to 10 miles offshore north of Cleveland.

Steel Winds farm, Lackawanna, NY

It’s easy to list the benefits of renewable energy, but calculating the costs can be difficult, like the impact on birds.


On the Atwater Farm, a commercial dairy farm near Lake Ontario, the sound of diesel trucks thunders through the air as they bring in loads of harvested corn for cow feed. 


Nick Maxwell, WBFO News

A local environmental group gained international recognition Tuesday. The Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper received the Thiess International Riverprize for its restoration work on the Niagara River and surrounding watershed.

Every weekend James Rice goes for a walk, but it’s not just any walk. He’s on a mission to educate anglers about the safest way to consume fish caught in Western New York.

by Angelica A. Morrison

Each summer, bacteria can force beaches on the Great Lakes to close. Now researchers are battling the bacteria with a genetic-based process.

PHOTO: LBJ Presidential Library / PHOTO: LBJ Presidential Library

It’s been decades since Lake Erie was considered dead due to years of industrial pollution. President Lyndon B. Johnson was a powerful force in bringing Lake Erie back to life and changing the fate of the Great Lakes for the better.


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