Angelica A. Morrison

Reporter/Producer

Angelica A. Morrison is a multimedia journalist with over a decade of experience in the field.

Morrison joined the WBFO-FM staff in April 2016. Born and bred in upstate New York, Angelica has a passion for New York State and its inhabitants. Her adventures in journalism have taken her across the state. After graduating from Buffalo State College, she worked as a reporter for the Lockport Union Sun and Journal, then as a freelance writer for The Buffalo News.

She then trekked across the state to Utica, New York where she worked for several years as a multimedia journalist and web producer for the Observer-Dispatch and then served as a news producer/web producer for the NBC affiliate WKTV News Channel 2.

Morrison returned to Buffalo in the spring of 2014 and reintroduced herself to the public as a freelance journalist for The Buffalo News and The Niagara Gazette.

You can contact Angelica at amorrison@wbfo.org and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/amorrisonWBFO.

Photo from Google map

This week marks the 40th anniversary of the first emergency declaration signed by President Jimmy Carter for the toxic waste dump Love Canal in Niagara Falls.


by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

The Buffalo Niagara Waterkeeper announced the completion of the habitat restoration project for the Buffalo River Monday morning.

In courtrooms across New York, the bail system helps guarantee defendants show up for their cases. But critics say the system hurts low-income families; if they can’t put up thousands of dollars, they have to sit in jail.

States like New Jersey, California and New Mexico have already reformed their bail structure. Now, reform in New York State is being looked at as well.


FACEBOOK / India Cummings of Rochester in a graduation photo at Wilson High School in Rochester NY. The NYS Commission of Correction declared her death a homicide due to medical neglect.

It’s a been a few days since the explosive report was released by the state Commission of Correction Medical Review Board, regarding the death of India Cummings.


by ANGELICA A. MORRISON / Cornell's Ruth Richardson explains the water testing process.

Many are heading to the beach to escape the hot temperatures this summer, only to find the water is closed. Now, a group of researchers is trying out a new method that could deliver water testing results faster.

Fifteen teachers, several from New York State, sailed off Monday morning  on research vessel called The Lake Guardian.


In Minneapolis, people are protesting the police shooting of a black 31-year-old man. Details are still hazy, but some see it as another racially-charged confrontation involving police. In Buffalo, some residents say they feel a race-based bias when it comes to policing.

This week, ABC cancelled Roseanne Barr’s TV show because of a racially charged tweet. It’s the latest in a string of troubling racial incidents – like the white woman who called the police on a black family barbecuing. But these are everyday realities faced by folks living in brown, black, tan, or just “not” white skin. Experts call this a troubling undercurrent of racism.


Canada is moving to legalize recreational use of marijuana, and officials predict that it’s likely to happen by the end of the year. As pot suppliers gear up for the change. one huge greenhouse being built near the U.S. border is raising some concerns.


Consumer Reports / Black legged tick removal

Environmental experts are debunking old myths when it comes to removing a tick.


Issues surrounding housing inequities in Buffalo were brought to light during a panel discussion at the WNED|WBFO Studios Wednesday night, as part of WBFO's Racial Equity Project.

Deaths of expectant mothers is the target of a new initiative handed down from Albany.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON /University at Buffalo dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Liesl Folks, leads the NAVIGATE Project at UB

The STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math – have traditionally been dominated by men. And that can make it tough for women to break in – or gain respect. The Me Too movement is highlighting those issues. And some female professionals in the Great Lakes Region have their own stories about the culture of gender bias.


CREDIT: ANGELICA A. MORRISON / Canopy Growth Corporation and Niagara College Canada make announcement of partnership

Niagara College Canada signed off on a deal  this week with a marijuana company. The college known for its horticulture curriculum is joining forces with Canopy Growth Corporation to offer Canada's first fully accredited post-secondary program that specializes in showing students how to grow marijuana.

YouTube / Martin Luther King Jr. at Kleinhans Music Hall, Nov. 1967

Just five months before Martin Luther King was assassinated, he visited Buffalo. It was a tense time for race relations, here and across America, but King’s words resonate today.


Scientists say climate change affects everything from weather patterns to animal migrations. And now, a popular breakfast condiment could be at risk as well – maple syrup. That’s bad news for the Great Lakes region, which produces a lot of it.


by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

Out on farmland in western New York, near the shore of Lake Erie, is Five & 20 Spirits and Brewing. Here, they make more than just booze. They also raise fish.


by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

The STEM field is historically an area were African Americans and minorities have been under-represented.

But several have broken through the barriers like...  astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.  And nuclear scientist J. Ernest Wilkins Jr., -- he attended the University of Chicago at the age of 13. And now, many local African American STEM professionals are encouraging others to carry the torch.


Inside the Mediterranean and cactus display at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington Ontario Canada

Copyright 2018 Great Lakes Today. To see more, visit Great Lakes Today.

A group of workers from the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington, Ontario pile discarded Christmas trees onto an organic barrier used to block the Common Carp from entering the wetland area.

Copyright 2018 Great Lakes Today. To see more, visit Great Lakes Today.

Canada's Royal Botanical Gardens sit near the western end of Lake Ontario, just a short drive from the U.S. border. When the weather is warm, visitors come to see acres of gardens with roses, lilacs and other collections in bloom.

In the winter, it’s much quieter. But scientists stay busy, protecting wetlands from destructive carp. And they're using an unusual weapon: Christmas trees.


ANGELICA A. MORRISON

At a pediatric clinic located in one of the poorest sections of Buffalo, 7-year-old asthmatic Victor Small sits with his mother Laticka. The hood on his winter coat is pulled over his head, and as he fidgets with his black skeleton gloves, he begins to talk about what it’s like when he has trouble breathing.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

First in a series on environmental justice issues.

The scent of exhaust fumes fill the air on a mid-January afternoon. Cars, trucks and buses zip back and forth from downtown Buffalo on the Kensington Expressway, also known as the Martin Luther King Jr. Expressway.

Recent icy conditions were the cause of concern for fans of the USS Little Rock. The Navy ship was commissioned in Buffalo last month, but has not made it out to sea.


Flooding along Lake Ontario. A sunken ship. Eerie waves. A dissected Asian carp. All images from a memorable 2017 -- and part of Great Lakes Today reporting that ranged from Montreal to Duluth. Take a look at our favorite photos of the year. 

Towne Garden Pediatrics

A local pediatric clinic is going above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to health care. The Towne Garden Pediatric Clinic on William Street has been collecting children's coats, snow suits and other items for its young patients.

Over the years, pollution has been seen as a big threat to fish in the Great Lakes. Now, a data scientist says that might not always be the case.


As America confronts the opioid crisis, environmental scientists are warning about a related problem. Chemicals from pain-killers and other drugs often end up in lakes and rivers, creating what some scientists say could be a deadly cocktail for fish and other wildlife.


The problem of sewer overflows affects the entire Great Lakes region. More than 182 municipalities have systems that can release untreated sewage during big storms, the Environmental Protection Agency says.


A new collaboration between the Great Lakes Commission and Lawrence Technological University in Michigan takes aim at sewer overflows that are polluting the Great Lakes.


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