Angelica A. Morrison

Reporter/Producer

Angelica A. Morrison is a multimedia journalist with over a decade of experience in the field.

Morrison joined the WBFO-FM staff in April 2016. Born and bred in upstate New York, Angelica has a passion for New York State and its inhabitants. Her adventures in journalism have taken her across the state. After graduating from Buffalo State College, she worked as a reporter for the Lockport Union Sun and Journal, then as a freelance writer for The Buffalo News.

She then trekked across the state to Utica, New York where she worked for several years as a multimedia journalist and web producer for the Observer-Dispatch and then served as a news producer/web producer for the NBC affiliate WKTV News Channel 2.

Morrison returned to Buffalo in the spring of 2014 and reintroduced herself to the public as a freelance journalist for The Buffalo News and The Niagara Gazette.

You can contact Angelica at amorrison@wbfo.org and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/amorrisonWBFO.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

The STEM field is historically an area were African Americans and minorities have been under-represented.

But several have broken through the barriers like...  astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.  And nuclear scientist J. Ernest Wilkins Jr., -- he attended the University of Chicago at the age of 13. And now, many local African American STEM professionals are encouraging others to carry the torch.


Inside the Mediterranean and cactus display at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington Ontario Canada

Copyright 2018 Great Lakes Today. To see more, visit Great Lakes Today.

A group of workers from the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington, Ontario pile discarded Christmas trees onto an organic barrier used to block the Common Carp from entering the wetland area.

Copyright 2018 Great Lakes Today. To see more, visit Great Lakes Today.

Canada's Royal Botanical Gardens sit near the western end of Lake Ontario, just a short drive from the U.S. border. When the weather is warm, visitors come to see acres of gardens with roses, lilacs and other collections in bloom.

In the winter, it’s much quieter. But scientists stay busy, protecting wetlands from destructive carp. And they're using an unusual weapon: Christmas trees.


ANGELICA A. MORRISON

At a pediatric clinic located in one of the poorest sections of Buffalo, 7-year-old asthmatic Victor Small sits with his mother Laticka. The hood on his winter coat is pulled over his head, and as he fidgets with his black skeleton gloves, he begins to talk about what it’s like when he has trouble breathing.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

First in a series on environmental justice issues.

The scent of exhaust fumes fill the air on a mid-January afternoon. Cars, trucks and buses zip back and forth from downtown Buffalo on the Kensington Expressway, also known as the Martin Luther King Jr. Expressway.

Recent icy conditions were the cause of concern for fans of the USS Little Rock. The Navy ship was commissioned in Buffalo last month, but has not made it out to sea.


Flooding along Lake Ontario. A sunken ship. Eerie waves. A dissected Asian carp. All images from a memorable 2017 -- and part of Great Lakes Today reporting that ranged from Montreal to Duluth. Take a look at our favorite photos of the year. 

Towne Garden Pediatrics

A local pediatric clinic is going above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to health care. The Towne Garden Pediatric Clinic on William Street has been collecting children's coats, snow suits and other items for its young patients.

Over the years, pollution has been seen as a big threat to fish in the Great Lakes. Now, a data scientist says that might not always be the case.


As America confronts the opioid crisis, environmental scientists are warning about a related problem. Chemicals from pain-killers and other drugs often end up in lakes and rivers, creating what some scientists say could be a deadly cocktail for fish and other wildlife.


The problem of sewer overflows affects the entire Great Lakes region. More than 182 municipalities have systems that can release untreated sewage during big storms, the Environmental Protection Agency says.


A new collaboration between the Great Lakes Commission and Lawrence Technological University in Michigan takes aim at sewer overflows that are polluting the Great Lakes.


First of three parts

Reports on climate change often highlight the impact to America's coastal cities. But plants, crops and trees are also at risk -- and the harm can spread well beyond field and forest.


Angelica Morrison / WBFO News

The USS Little Rock LCS 9 Commissioning Committee announced the details of the arrival and commissioning of the USS Little Rock LCS-9 Friday morning at the Buffalo & Erie County Naval and Military Park.

There’s some bad news in the Great Lakes and it’s all about the sea lamprey, an eel-like creature that literally sucks the life out of fish. They do a lot of damage and now they’re on the rise in some lakes.

That trend has stumped scientists.


Buffalo Police Department

Thousand of people are expected to attend funeral services in KeyBank Center next week for fallen Buffalo Police Officer Craig Lehner.

Graphic displaying oil transport through out the Great Lakes Region

Matthew Child, a scientist with the International Joint Commission, talks with Great Lakes Today's Angelica Morrison about the transporting oil throughout the Great Lakes region.

It’s day two of the Great Lakes Restoration Conference in Buffalo New York. Hundreds  are learning about problems that affect the lakes, including microplastics.


The ethanol mandate was among the topics of discussion at the Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Restoration Conference in Buffalo, N.Y.

Agriculture Policy Analyst for the National Wildlife Federation David DeGennaro discusses the issue as it relates to the Great Lake region.

Matthew Child, a scientist with the International Joint Commission, talks with Great Lakes Today's Angelica Morrison about the transporting oil throughout the Great Lakes region.

The Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Restoration Conference is under way this week, bringing attention to critical Great Lakes issues.


Niagara Falls, N.Y., has a messy problem -- it continues to dump sewage and discolored water downriver from the popular tourist attraction. The most recent incident happened Wednesday afternoon.


Several states, including a few in the Great Lakes region, have received a sizable chunk of money from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities. The funding is to increase protections in watershed areas.


A small island in the Niagara River has received a makeover, thanks to the New York State Power Authority and the state Department of Environmental Conservation.Angelica A. Morrison reports.

Lake Erie is a route for huge freighters carrying cargo to cities like Cleveland and Buffalo. Now a company wants to use the lake to transport another product: electricity.


The topic of sewage discharges is back in the spotlight again in Niagara Falls and surrounding areas.


Several water-related issues were the highlight of a report released today by a Western New York environmental group.


The US Department of Agriculture is asking residents along the Great Lakes corridor and beyond to watch out for an invader- the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB).


NIAGARA FALLS, NY - An environmental alert was issued by the New York State Alert system early Wednesday morning advising residents of a sewer discharge in the Niagara River near the popular American Falls.


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