Caitlin Whyte

Caitlin joins WXXI after working down the street at Stephens Media Group where, she co hosted a children's radio show, "Saturday Morning CarTunes" on WARM 101.3 and worked as a traffic reporter for various affiliates.

Prior to that, she lived in Western Alaska where she worked for KNOM in Nome.  When she was not engrossed in all things Iditarod, Caitlin served as the community and education spot producer and hosted the weekday morning program.

Originally from Rochester, Caitlin graduated from SUNY Plattsburgh with a B.S in Audio/Radio Production and Broadcast Management. She is excited to make the jump to public radio and host Weekend Edition.

 

Tuesday was the last full day of the New York Association of Counties fall seminar in Rochester, where weather and climate were the topic of the keynote address.

The keynote speaker was Josh Darr, senior vice president and lead meteorologist at JLT, which does risk assessments.

He says weather isn’t getting worse, but more weather is happening in the extremes.

Darr says counties need to watch weather patterns to decide how to spend their assets -- whether it's people, time or money.

National Toy Hall of Fame

The National Toy Hall of Fame here in Rochester has announced the 12 finalists for this year’s induction. Are your favorites included?

American Dairy Association North East

What happens to the butter sculpture at the New York State Fair once the event is over? Well, for the third year, it will be recycled and used for electricity.

The Cumming Nature Center is a little oasis about an hour south of Rochester. With miles of quiet trails through swamplands and towering pine trees, it’s a great place to talk about citizen science.

So what exactly does that term mean?

Nathan Hayes, the director of the nature center, says its the “crowdsourcing of scientific information. Multiple people all over the place putting the puzzle pieces together to get the picture.”

There is so much information to collect, Hayes says, that scientists alone can’t do it all. That’s where the rest of us can help. He says people can get involved and collect valuable information wherever they may be.

“We can study -- we should study -- these woods, and not worry about the Amazon. I mean, worry about the Amazon, but you don’t have to go away to contribute to important scientific base of knowledge, you can do it in your backyard.”


In a letter released Monday, Pope Francis referred to the acts are "atrocities" and says that the "wounds never disappear."

Tim Thibodeau is a History and Political Science professor at Nazareth College, specializing in the history of the Catholic Church.

He believes social media has helped these issues come to light.