Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

The European Commission has fined Google $5 billion for violating the European Union's antitrust rules — specifically, by forcing manufacturers of Android phones to install the Google search app and the Chrome Web browser.

"Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement. "These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits."

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

The company that owns the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas has asked federal courts to declare that it is not liable in the October 2017 mass shooting carried out by a gunman staying at Mandalay Bay.

Stephen Paddock stayed at the resort for several days before he opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest music festival. Aiming from the windows of his 32nd-floor hotel room, he killed 58 people and injured hundreds.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

With chants of "families united" and "free our children now," hundreds of people marched to the tent city in Tornillo, Texas, where children have been detained for immigration violations.

The Father's Day march near El Paso was primarily organized by Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, who is also running for Senate against Ted Cruz. He says the march was the brainchild of Veronica Escobar, who is running to fill his seat in the House, as well as other community leaders.

In the spring of 2014, Eric Abramovitz got the opportunity of a lifetime.

He just didn't know it.

Abramovitz was the victim of a deception that a Canadian judge called "despicable," as he granted Abramovitz $350,000 Canadian dollars (more than $260,000 U.S.) in damages.

The Afghan government and the Taliban have begun a rare three-day cease-fire in honor of Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday marking the end of Ramadan.

The cessation in hostilities is actually two separate, unilateral cease-fires — one by the government, which began earlier this week and is expected to last about a week, and an overlapping three-day cease-fire by the Taliban.

The voice of legendary physicist Stephen Hawking is to be broadcast into space after his memorial service on Friday, according to British media outlets.

Specifically, it will be directed toward the nearest black hole. Hawking, who died in March, revolutionized the scientific understanding of black holes — and won the hearts of people across the world with his tireless scientific advocacy.

Dorothy Cotton, a leader in the civil rights movement who educated thousands of African-Americans about their rights and the power of organizing, has died at 88.

She died at a retirement community in Ithaca, N.Y., the Ithaca Journal reports. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference confirmed her death to the Associated Press.

Let's not bury the lede: The Two-Way will no longer be updating with the latest breaking news from NPR. Our work is not stopping, but it is relocating.

NPR is shifting how stories are presented online, removing a number of blogs and organizing those stories by topic instead.

That means this page — the Two-Way homepage — will no longer update. However, the reporters and editors are sticking around, and all our stories, on the same wide range of subjects, will continue to be on NPR.org.

Here's how to find us:

Originally, it was just a name — Olga Monsanto's name, to be precise.

Around the turn of the 20th century, she married a man named John Francis Queeny. He named his artificial sweetener company after her. And over decades, that company expanded from the sweetness business into agri-chemicals, where it began to dominate the industry.

Up to four major hurricanes could form in the Atlantic this hurricane season, according to the annual forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Overall, the season will likely be normal or somewhat more intense than normal, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, with a 25 percent chance that hurricane activity will be below normal.

A federal judge in Virginia has ruled that a high school discriminates against a trans student named Gavin Grimm by denying him access to the restroom that corresponds to his gender identity. Grimm says the ruling was "really fantastic," not just for him, but for trans youth in general.

Uber riders who experience sexual harassment or assault will now be able to take their claims to court, instead of being forced into private arbitration, the ride-hailing app announced Tuesday.

Uber, like many companies, has a clause in its user agreement — and its employment contract — that requires a person to waive his or her constitutional right to take Uber to court. Instead, disputes are taken before a private third-party arbitrator, who is paid by the company.

Updated 2:06 a.m. ET Tuesday

The Supreme Court threw open the door to legalized sports betting on Monday. By a 6-3 vote, the court struck down a 1992 federal law that effectively prevented most states from legalizing sports betting.

"Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each State is free to act on its own," the court wrote.

An NBC Universal investigation into multiple accusations of sexual misconduct by former Today host Matt Lauer found that the allegations were credible, but that the conduct in question was never specifically reported to human resources or to senior NBC News executives.

On Sunday night, the Tampa Bay Lightning defeated the Boston Bruins to head to the NHL's Eastern Conference Finals.

And nobody licked anybody.

That was not a guarantee. Bruins left wing Brad Marchand licked opposing players twice this postseason.

NASA's InSight lander is on its way to Mars, after a successful launch on Saturday morning.

The lander was launched by an Atlas V rocket taking off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California shortly after 4 a.m. local time. It successfully separated from the upper stage more than an hour later.

The lander is in contact with mission control as it heads off on its six-month trip to the Red Planet.

The city of Detroit has been released from state oversight of its finances, three years after exiting the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history.

Detroit posted balanced budgets and surpluses for each of those three years — a key factor in the decision by Michigan's financial review commission, which voted on Monday to free Detroit from oversight.

It's a landmark achievement for the city, one that had been anticipated for months.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

A Danish citizen in Malaysia has pleaded guilty to maliciously publishing fake news by posting a YouTube video critical of police, making him the first person punished under the country's new, controversial Anti-Fake News Act.

Salah Salem Saleh Sulaiman, 46, is a citizen of Denmark. He posted on YouTube on April 21, after a Palestinian lecturer was shot and killed in Kuala Lumpur.

Updated at 3:07 p.m. ET

T-Mobile and Sprint have reached a "definitive agreement" to merge in an all-stock deal, which would create a new company with a total value of $146 billion, based on current stock prices.

The Fearless Girl statue, which has stared down the Manhattan financial district's famous Charging Bull for more than a year, will be relocating to a spot in front of the New York Stock Exchange.

The statue was installed near Wall Street in 2017 in honor of International Women's Day, and only had a temporary permit. But now it will remain in New York City permanently, at the new location just around the corner.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Starbucks is closing thousands of stores across the U.S. on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct "racial-bias education geared toward preventing discrimination in our stores," the company said in a statement.

Martin Sorrell, the powerful CEO who turned WPP into the world's largest advertising and PR firm, has resigned after allegations of misconduct.

The misconduct reportedly involved misuse of company funds — though not at a level "material" to the massive organization — as well as "personal misconduct."

WPP has completed its investigation into the allegations, but has not released any public details about what the allegations were, or whether they were substantiated. Sorrell has denied that the allegations have merit.

After a series of hospitalizations, former first lady Barbara Bush, 92, is focused on "comfort care," according to a statement released by the office of George H.W. Bush.

Bush is the wife of former President George H. W. Bush, and the mother of former President George W. Bush. She established the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy decades ago, promoting reading skills across America, particularly for young children.

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Mark Zuckerberg faced dozens of senators — and the American television audience — to take "hard questions" on how Facebook has handled user data and faced efforts to subvert democracy.

"We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I'm sorry," the co-founder and CEO of Facebook, uncharacteristically wearing a suit, said in his opening remarks. "I started Facebook, I run it, and I'm responsible for what happens here."

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

As predicted, China's Tiangong-1 space lab fell from the sky on Sunday evening.

The city bus-sized craft, which almost entirely burned up as it re-entered the Earth's atmosphere, broke into small pieces as it plummeted over the South Pacific Ocean. The derelict spacecraft has been slowly falling out of its original orbit for several years.

The U.S. added 200,000 jobs in January, continuing the trend of steady job growth for another month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday.

That means the economy has now added jobs for 88 months in a row. And, significantly, wages are on the rise, too.

Average hourly earnings rose by 9 cents to $26.74, with a year-over-year growth of 2.9 percent — the highest rate of growth the BLS recorded since June 2009.

The unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says recent changes to the site have reduced the amount of time users spend there — a development he says he expected, and one he welcomes as good for both his business and the health of society at large.

Editor's note: This story includes a description of sexual assault.

Larry Nassar, the former gymnastics doctor convicted of sexual assault, has returned to court Wednesday for a third and final sentencing hearing at which scores of accusers are expected again to speak publicly about their experiences.

The total number of women and girls who say Nassar abused them is around 250, according to Judge Janice Cunningham, The Associated Press reports.

In Los Angeles, Cleveland, Boston and other communities across America, people gathered on Thursday to honor the lives of the homeless people who died in 2017.

Dec. 21 — the winter solstice, the day with the longest night of the year — was named as the 2017 National Homeless Persons' Memorial Day by several advocacy groups.

A new president in real life means a new president at Magic Kingdom, too.

Specifically, a new animatronic figure in the Hall of Presidents at Walt Disney World, where every former leader of the republic is depicted in an "audio-animatronics show."

The exhibit is currently closed for updates and maintenance, but Disney has released a sneak peak of the new addition.

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