Jay Moran

Morning Edition Host

Monday - Friday, 6 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Ways to Connect

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Fueled by $279 million from the federal relicensing settlement with the New York Power Authority, growth has been evident throughout the 10 years Canalside has been in existence. While the money was vital, Congressman Brian Higgins also gives credit to the "spirit of cooperation" that has made Buffalo's waterfront into a regional destination.


WBFO file photo

As a former law student at the University at Buffalo, Stephanie Miner is familiar with Western New York. The former, two-term mayor of Syracuse was in town to introduce her gubernatorial campaign to the region. Running on the Serve America line, she sat down for a long interview at the WBFO studios.


BuffaloState.edu

Organized labor across the nation suffered a major blow Wednesday when the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. With the decision, public employees are no longer required to pay union dues, though they may still benefit from union-bargained contracts. "This has an impact on New York more than any other state," said Peter Yacobucci, professor of political science at Buffalo State College. "It will be devastating for public sector unions."


Francesca Bond

In lining up 1,500 plastic pink flamingos last week, the Olmsted Parks Conservancy made its way into the Guinness World Records. As Newell Nussbaumer and Jessica Marinelli of Buffalo Rising point out during WBFO's Press Pass, the effort raised funds and awareness for the Conservancy, which has helped to fuel a civic recovery in Buffalo.


Eileen Koteras Elibol

Some 150 classic vehicles will head to the starting line for the Great Race Saturday morning at the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum. Though the event made its way through Buffalo in 2012, the race start brings with it more prestige--and more dollars. Local tourism officials estimate the economic benefit to be at least $1.2 million.


ShakespeareInDelawarePark.org

It's a sign summer has arrived in Buffalo: the return of Shakespeare in Delaware Park.  After a few seasons since the Shakespeare classic was last seen on the Delaware Park stage, managing director Lisa Ludwig says the decision was made to start the 2018 season with King Lear. Directed by Steve Vaughan, the production runs through July 15.


WBFO file photo

Among those on hand in federal court in Manhattan Monday for the opening of the trial of Dr. Alain Kaloyeros was Jimmy Vielkind, Capitol bureau chief for Politico.com. In a morning interview with WBFO, Vielkind discussed a defense strategy which painted Kaloyeros as an administrator who cut through red tape and followed established practices in creating jobs throughout the state. Prosecutors accuse Kaloyeros and his co-defendants of bid-rigging in securing lucrative state development contracts. 


WSKG News

Critics have been consistent in blasting state economic development efforts over their lack of transparency. That cloud may be lifted during the federal corruptions trial against Dr. Alain Kaloyeros, which begins today in Manhattan.

Tonight's Gusto Vinyl Happy Hour at Sportsmen's Tavern will be centered on Miles Davis' 1959 album, "Kind of Blue." According to Buffalo News music critic Jeff Miers, the night will begin promptly at 7 p.m. with a listen to the top-selling jazz album of all-time. That will be followed by an audience give-and-take before a group of musicians takes the stage to perform the entire album.


JPMorganChaseCC.om

Organizers report over 14,000 runners and walkers have registered for tonight's J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge. According to race director Melina Buck, nearly 400 companies have organized teams for the annual event in Delaware Park. The race begins at 6:45 pm on Amherst Street near Nottingham. The race route runs south on Delaware Avenue to Gates Circle before returning to the finish line in Delaware Park.


OurAbility.com

John Robinson and Doug Hamlin are in the midst of what has become an annual endeavor. Partners in the firm Our Ability, they are undertaking their "Journey Along the Erie Canal." For John and Doug, who have little or no use of their legs, the 12-day, 350-mile ride is an "opportunity" to display how people with disabilities can adapt to any circumstance.


WBFO file

While much has been made recently about apparent conflicts of interest at the highest levels of the federal government, a new report is placing the spotlight on the potential for such conflicts on the local level. In a review of the financial disclosure forms required for elected officials in 10 area government entities, the Buffalo Niagara Coalition for Open Government found some troubling inconsistencies.

Though the drowning death of Buffalo Police Officer Craig Lehner remains under investigation, some troubling details regarding the incident continue to emerge. For her recent reporting, Daniela Porat of Investigative Post reviewed United States Coast Guard documents recorded during the search for Lehner. During her monthly appearance on WBFO's Press Pass, Porat described how the Niagara River's swift conditions on that fatal day were less than ideal for a training exercise.


Mike Desmond/WBFO

Commuters frustrated with the detours around the Skyway have a sympathetic ear in Congressman Brian Higgins. Though the re-decking of the bridge has been underway for a few weeks, he remains unyielding in his criticism. For Higgins, the $30 million effort is "a compete waste of money because that bridge could not be constructed today because it's unsafe. It doesn't have shoulders in the event vehicles break down."

MolinaroforDutchess.com

Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro is trying to connect with voters as he challenges Governor Andrew Cuomo.  "I'm an ordinary New Yorker. I grew up in a family where food stamps put dinner on the table. It was easy to be humble." In a conversation with WBFO, Molinaro criticized the incumbent for his economic policies and the allegations of corruption swirling his administration. "I think New Yorkers deserve a governor who knows how hard it is to live and work in New York."


Before falling on hard times, Seneca Street once stood as the hub of commerce and entertainment in South Buffalo. That could be changing. During his monthly appearance on WBFO's Press Pass, Jim Fink of Business First highlights some new developments that will bring new vitality to the neighborhood.


OLV

He was considered to be the last living connection to Fr. Nelson Baker. John Phillips of South Buffalo, who died last week at the age of 95, lived his formative years at the orphanage founded and operated by Baker. Phillips' recollections have been used by advocates as they work to have Baker canonized as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church.


Buffalo.edu

The move of University at Buffalo's medical school into a new facility to downtown Buffalo created a major vacancy at the university's South Campus. Officials have been preparing for the shift and this summer they will kick off a major phase of a campus revitalization plan. The public gets a chance to review the details at a forum at 5:30 tonight at  114 Wende Hall.


With a depressed farm economy already hurting their prospects, many local growers and producers would have welcomed passage of the 2018 Farm Bill. Instead, the House of Representatives voted it down last week. Steve Ammerman of the New York Farm Bureau says his agency is "disappointed" by the rejection which was fueled by a conflicting assortment of political priorities.

Clay Davies

With pleasant weather in the forecast organizers are expecting another solid crowd of cyclists tonight for the third Slow Roll Buffalo of the season. Co-founder Seamus Gallivan sees the effort as "a way to come together. We need that in Buffalo and we really feel like the bike is the best vehicle to do it."  Tonight's event begins at 6:30 at West Side Community Services on Vermont Street. Forest Avenue and Connecticut, West Ferry and Grant Streets make up part of the ten-mile course.


EpiscopalChurch.org

The Most Reverend Michael Curry of the Episcopal Church captured millions with the focus of his sermon during this weekend's Royal Wedding. Curry's connection with Buffalo is now gaining attention.

New York Immigration Coalition

With Erie County Clerk Michael Kearns speaking out against undocumented immigrants receiving driver's licenses, the issue has taken center stage. One advocate believes Kearns will "find himself on the wrong side of history."


Dave Debo / WBFO News

Since the enactment of New York's property tax cap, school budgets are being approved on an almost routine basis. Earlier this week, 97.6 percent of school budgets passed acrossed the state, according to Tim Kremer of the New York State School Boards Association. The focus on holding down taxes, Kremer says, has had unintended consequences.  "I hate to say it, but I think people (have) become apathetic."


Mike Desmond / WBFO News

All 76 Buffalo school nurses have to find new assignments this summer. As employees of Kaleida Health, their assignments in Buffalo Public Schools is ending. The Buffalo School Board Wednesday night voted to replace them with cheaper, non-union nurses from two staffing agencies.


Buffalo Rising

On Saturday, city homeowners and businesses will open their porches to local bands for Buffalo Porchfest. While the event offers music lovers a wide variety of options, it also serves as a celebration of the symbolic value of the porch. "Porches offer a sense of community," said Newell Nussbaumer of Buffalo Rising during WBFO's Press Pass. The event and the sense of community it inspires, Nussbaumer says, have prompted many homeowners to rebuild their porches and, in a greater sense, restore their city.


Shumita Basu / WAMC News

The news of Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's resignation was only a few hours old when names of his possible replacement began to emerge. So it goes in Albany, where politically-laced scandals have become commonplace. Jimmy Vielkind, who covers the state capital for Politico, shared some perspective in an interview with WBFO's Morning Edition.


WBFO File Photo

Since his purchase of Buffalo's tallest building, Washington-based developer Douglas Jemal has promised to bring new life to One Seneca Tower. That rebirth appears to be ahead of schedule. Appearing outside Monday's meeting of the city Planning Board, attorney Adam Walters says the project is moving forward at a "breakneck pace."

While reporting from 90 different countries, Ami Vitale has come to realize some dire realities. "We're witnessing extinction on our watch." Vitale shares her insights and experiences during "Rhinos, Rickshaws and Revolutions," a multi-media presentation showing Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Kleinhans Music Hall.


Road Less Traveled Productions

When he read Lucas Hnath's "The Christians," Scott Behrend, executive director of Road Less Traveled Productions, knew his company needed to tackle the play. "What drew me to this play was, of course, the central argument, which is, Is there a hell?" With a cast of Dave Hayes, Lisa Vitrano, Aaron Moss, Steve Jakiel and Victoria Perez, "The Christians" runs through May 20.


Twitter

Western New York political consultant Michael Caputo spent three hours Wednesday in Washington answering questions from a team of investigators from the office of special counsel Robert Mueller. In an interview with WBFO, Caputo  declined to get into specifics regarding his testimony. He did indicate, however, that investigators showed little interest in President Trump; their focus was on the consultant's "friends" who were associated with the campaign.


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