Karen DeWitt

Albany Reporter

Karen DeWitt is Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. WBFO listeners are accustomed to hearing DeWitt’s insightful coverage throughout the day, including expanded reports on Morning Edition.

DeWitt is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

DeWitt has served as a panelist for numerous political debates, including the 2014 gubernatorial debate sponsored by WNED|WBFO

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Citizens Budget Commission website

Governor Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget Tuesday. Revenues are down, and the repeal of the Affordable Care Act could cost the state billions of dollars.


David Irish

In Betsy Irish’s room, it’s all about the music. There is a big boom box in the corner, framed CD jackets and a special box just for Christmas music.

She’s hanging out with her dad, David Irish, at her group house in a suburb of Rochester. They’re doing one of their usual activities — reading the dictionary.

Governor Cuomo's office

Governor Andrew Cuomo has ended his six-city State of the State tour, speaking for nine hours total, according to his estimates, and traveling over 1,200 miles — with one emergency helicopter landing thrown in for good measure. But the departure from the traditional speech before lawmakers at the Capitol has its advantages and its drawbacks.


Governor Cuomo's office

Governor Andrew Cuomo saved his ethics proposals for the last stop of his State of the State tour in Albany, where he released a 10-point plan to address rampant corruption that has reached his own administration.


WBFO File Photo

Governor Andrew Cuomo is pushing a plan that he says could cut property taxes in New York — by requiring county leaders to develop a cost-cutting plan and letting voters decide whether it’s a good idea.


WBFO News file photo

The State of the State is coming to Buffalo Monday afternoon, as Governor Cuomo has moved the Constitutionally-mandated message and speech from Albany to six sites around the state. Monday morning he will deliver the address in Manhattan before flying to Buffalo for an appearance at the University at Buffalo's Center for the Arts.


The new year for the state Legislature has begun in discord, with an absent governor and Republicans in the Senate vowing to take a harder line against Democrat Andrew Cuomo.


WBFO File Photo

An ethics reform proposal quietly circulated between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders for a possible special session that also could include a pay raise is getting blasted by the state’s attorney general as possibly unconstitutional.


Karen Dewitt

Advocates for the homeless say the governor and Legislature don’t need to call a special session to free up more money to help create more housing for those in need. They say political leaders could simply sign an already printed memorandum of understanding and start helping people now.


WBFO File Photo

In Albany’s own version of Groundhog Day, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders are still keeping open the possibility of a special session before the year ends that could include legalizing ride-sharing services statewide and a pay raise for lawmakers.


Karen DeWitt

Former President Bill Clinton cast his ballot for his wife, failed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, at Monday’s Electoral College meeting in Albany. Clinton blames the loss on the Russians and the FBI.

WBFO File Photo

Discussions over a December special session has turned to finger pointing, as Governor Cuomo and Senate Republicans blame each other over lack of progress.

If Gov. Andrew Cuomo and lawmakers hold a special session next week, they are likely to consider whether to allow ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft to operate outside of New York City.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News

The state’s comptroller has a plan to reduce corruption in the awarding of economic development contracts that has led to the indictment of former associates of Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Joel Ulrich / National Public Radio

Two years ago, the state banned hydrofracking of natural gas within the state’s borders. However, a group of Cornell scientists who study the effects of climate change say New Yorkers are using more natural gas than ever.

WBFO File Photo

A committee of the state Board of Regents recommends spending $2.1 billion more on schools in the new state budget, saying it’s time to continue an effort begun a decade ago to funnel more money to the state’s poorest school districts.


WBFO File Photo

Talks between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders are still continuing over whether to hold a special session before the holidays — and the clock is ticking.


WBFO File Photo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he has spoken to federal prosecutors regarding the prosecution of his former top aide and eight others involved in an economic development scandal.


President-elect Donald Trump has promised to repeal the Affordable Health Care Act — also known as Obamacare — and replace it with something else. While no one really knows what that means, one health care analyst with a prominent Albany think tank said New York could be billions of dollars in the hole as a result.


Governor Cuomo and state lawmakers are still trying to put together a special session before the end of the year that could include a pay raise.

www.entergy-nuclear.com

A long-term energy plan by the Cuomo administration that includes a nearly $8 billion subsidy to two upstate nuclear power plants is being challenged from both ends of the political spectrum, and a lawsuit has been filed to try to stop the deal.


Photo courtesy of Karen Dewitt

The state’s Attorney General has released a package of bills aimed at improving what he says is the state’s “arcane” and “ridiculous” voting laws that bar many potential voters from the ballot box.


WXXI News

State lawmakers are considering whether to have a special session this month where they would vote on, among other things, a pay raise for themselves.


WBFO File Photo

Governor Andrew Cuomo spent the early part of this week in a marathon bill signing — and vetoing — session. The governor rejected an unusually high number of bills, and some supporters of the vetoed measures aren’t pleased.


WBFO News File Photo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pressuring state lawmakers to come back in December for a special session that includes a number of reform items to address recent corruption scandals. In exchange, he said, they could potentially be rewarded with a pay raise.

Matt Ryan / New York Now

Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued his first public comments since his former top aide and other former associates were indicted on corruption charges just before Thanksgiving.

Associated Press

Indictments are due by Wednesday in an economic development corruption scandal involving Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s former top aide and other former associates. The governor has been active in recent days on other matters, including taking steps to counteract a rise in hate crimes after the election of Donald Trump as president.


Will there be a special session of the legislature this December? Gov. Andrew Cuomo is offering lawmakers an incentive to come back to meet — a possible pay raise, in exchange for ethics reforms.

Governor Cuomo's office

Governor Cuomo on Sunday took a number of steps that he says are in reaction to the divisiveness in the nation ,  that has intensified since the Presidential election. Cuomo, without mentioning President-elect Donald Trump by name, said the “ugly discourse” has made him “soul sick” for America.


Governor Cuomo is adopting a more conciliatory tone toward President elect Donald Trump, after Cuomo called Trump “un-New York” in the final days of the campaign.


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