Cultural
9:52 am
Tue January 22, 2013

New garden for kids to learn about plants opens at Botanical Gardens

New Wegmans Family Gardens
New Wegmans Family Gardens
Credit WBFO News photo by Mike Desmond

There is a new place for children to learn about the lives of plants at the Buffalo and Erie County Botanical Gardens. 

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held at the Gardens Monday afternoon at the Gardens to unveil  the newest attraction  -- the Wegmans Family Gardens.  A group of children participated in the opening of the new garden, built in a former forcing shed that has been replaced with display areas that offer kids a place to dig and plant. 

New Wegmans Family Gardens
New Wegmans Family Gardens
Credit WBFO News photo by Mike Desmond

The area will be used for Saturday morning classes about healthy eating, as well just a place for children to play.

Young people from Edu-Kids were learning how to grind wheat into flour and what they can do with the other end of the process, like Cheerios.

Wegmans Consumer Affairs Manager Theresa Jackson said kids will learn healthy eating.

"Utilizing their senses, kids here can truly experience, some for the first time the idea that fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and grains actually grow and are plants before they become food," said Jackson. "They grow from the ground. They grow on vines or from trees, all before they arrive on your plate. Kids will be able to come to those Saturday classes and plant seeds and watch them grow over time."  

David Swarts, president & CEO of Botanical Gardens
David Swarts, president & CEO of Botanical Gardens
Credit WBFO News photo by Mike Desmond

Botanical Gardens president and CEO David Swarts said it's part of a shift in activities at the South Park facility to education for all ages.  

"Education is one of our primary missions," said Swarts.  "The Wegmans Family Garden allows us to provide that educational experience for children through out the year.,"

Kids will be able to plant seeds in the new garden area and over time watch the seeds turn into plants.

"For them to see it visually, for them to touch it, it takes on a totally different meaning," said Swarts.