Urban growing program could help improve food access

Apr 10, 2017

Efforts to promote accessible and affordable food took center stage recently at an East Side community center as advocates highlighted what’s known as the People’s Food Movement.

An event was held Saturday at the Delavan Grider Community Center when people discussed efforts to implement an urban growers policy in Buffalo and other food-related topics.

Credit African Heritage Food Co-op

The African Heritage Food Co-op was among the participating groups. President and CEO Alexander Wright said nutritious food is essential to one’s health.

“Good food is like good fuel for a car, it keeps you going without giving you the slug, and the slime, and the slump,” Wright said during a visit to WBFO. “Basically apples, oranges and vegies, clean, lean meats --- things that’ll help your body run faster give you more energy.”  

Wright also talked about the goals behind this movement.

Encouraging more local residents to grow fruit and vegetables is one strategy for promoting “good food,” Wright said, adding that the goal is to create local network of urban growers.

”How many people are growing in their backyard? How many people have green thumbs and just love it, but they don’t see a way to make it fruitful. So we want to bring these people together and say alright, how are we going to make this work for us.”

A light meal was served at the start of the event that highlighted farm-to-school menu items in the Buffalo Public Schools.

The event was held in the same month that Siena College Research Institute released a survey indicating that low-income New Yorkers continue to suffer financially due to the high costs of nutritional food.

Credit African Heritage Food Co-op

The survey found that many families face food challenges that include affordability and accessibility.