The World

Monday - Friday 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman
  • Local Host Mark Wozniak

Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is. The World is heard on over 300 stations across North America.

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Israel teaches cybersecurity skills to its high schoolers

23 minutes ago

The Israeli military did not allow photos that would identify the 10th-grade students hunched over laptops in a darkened classroom last month.

That’s because when they graduate, about half of them will be recruited into one of the Israeli army’s cyber units, including the secretive Unit 8200 — the equivalent of the US National Security Agency.

When the UK government officially filed divorce papers Wednesday to leave the European Union, Darren Grimes woke up a happy camper.

“I’m extremely optimistic about our future chances outside in the world!” he chimes. “I think Brexit and the repeal bill present a great opportunity to bring about the changes our country so desperately needs.”

How alone are 'lone wolf' jihadi attackers?

Mar 24, 2017

The investigation into what exactly happened in London on Wednesday is really only just beginning. But the initial impression is that it was a "lone wolf" attack by an ISIS supporter, like we saw in Orlando, Nice and Berlin.

We've become accustomed to hearing the phrase "self-radicalized" in connection with these lone wolves. But is that really the case? Are they alone, radicalizing themselves?

It turns out that most lone wolves are actually groomed and mentored, one-on-one, by individual ISIS operatives.

How alone are 'lone wolf' jihadi attackers?

Mar 24, 2017

The investigation into what exactly happened in London on Wednesday is really only just beginning. But the initial impression is that it was a "lone wolf" attack by an ISIS supporter, like we saw in Orlando, Nice and Berlin.

We've become accustomed to hearing the phrase "self-radicalized" in connection with these lone wolves. But is that really the case? Are they alone, radicalizing themselves?

It turns out that most lone wolves are actually groomed and mentored, one-on-one, by individual ISIS operatives.

Six years ago, Ari Beser, a photographer from Baltimore, received a grant to visit the city of Hiroshima for the first time. He wanted to trace the path his grandfather had once taken. Jacob Beser, who died in 1992, flew over Japan as a member of the Army Air Force during World War II.

On the day that Beser got the grant, a tsunami struck the coast of Japan, flooding Fukushima nuclear power plant and causing an explosion and meltdown.

President Donald Trump proposed drastic cuts in spending on the arts, science, foreign aid and environmental protection Thursday, in a security-focused budget blueprint that could struggle to pass Congress.

Translating hardline campaign promises into dollar-and-cent commitments, the Republican leader proposed scrapping dozens of programs like public broadcasting and climate funding, while boosting Pentagon spending by $52 billion.

Six years after the Fukushima Daiichi meltdown, officials are still seeking ways to deal with the huge amount of hazardous waste being generated at the nuclear power plant.

Tokyo-based journalist James Simms has been covering the Fukushima cleanup since shortly after the effort was crippled by a tsunami in March 2011.

He told The World that six years on, there has been some progress toward decommissioning the plant, “but many unforeseen issues may mean that the cleanup and dismantling and decontamination will take longer than previously expected.”

In his new book "How May I Help You? An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage," Deepak Singh writes about what it was like to arrive in a new country he did not fully understand.

He came to the US from India to join his new wife, an American grad student in Charlottesville, Virginia. Singh arrived armed with an MBA from India, but he couldn’t find a job in his field in the US. He ended up working a minimum-wage job at a mall electronics store. 

Violence against women, as an acceptable practice in some cultures, is hardly a new story to me. For years, I’ve reported in countries across the Middle East and Asia, where women face deep-seated oppression and a lack of basic rights, including the right to pursue justice against domestic violence.

But this was different.

America's sanctuary communities are more numerous than you think

Mar 10, 2017

For some, the term "sanctuary city” is hardly new. It’s decades old, with roots in the 1980s — when churches defied federal officials and led efforts to house people escaping violence from Central America's civil wars.

As the debate over immigration policies and their legality intensifies, the push to protect unauthorized immigrants from deportation has spread to more than 600 counties in 30 states. While policies vary, one tactic used by resistant localities is to limit cooperation with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, when it comes to immigration detainers.

Why the fight over how immigrants are characterized is so important

Mar 1, 2017

For anyone who watched President Donald Trump’s address to Congress on Tuesday, the irony of who was in the audience on either side of the aisle was clear.

No group is more affected by Trump’s immigration ban than Iranians. Over 35,000 Iranians come to the US each year with temporary visas — more than any other nationality on the seven-country list.

Meanwhile, in Europe, many are struggling for recognition alongside unprecedented numbers of refugees.

Most of the asylum-seekers in Europe now are fleeing violence in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, but in 2015 more than 25,000 Iranians also sought asylum in Europe.

With 200 museums in greater Paris, newcomers face tough competition.

The privately run Phono Museum, which opened in 2014, guides visitors through the history of recorded sound. But it has struggled to overcome financial problems, despite a collection full of old and sometimes bizarre artifacts of audio history.

Donald Trump's pick for ambassador to Israel began his confirmation process in the Senate on Thursday. And the first thing David Friedman did was express regret for what he called his "inflammatory" language during the election campaign.

He didn't specify what that language was, but it probably included the word “kapo,” a German word with connotations that are highly insulting to Jews.

Russian state media ordered to scale back positive coverage of Donald Trump

Feb 17, 2017

The Kremlin ordered Russian state media on Thursday to stop praising Donald Trump. It was a big change, and an indication that the Putin-Trump "bromance" could be on the rocks.

The thing about my friend Hassan Iftin is that when things are really bad, his first reaction is to laugh. And to be honest, the past two weeks have been pretty bad if you’re a Somali Muslim refugee, like Hassan, hoping to start a new life in the United States.

When I called him up at his home in Nairobi, Kenya, a few days after the Trump immigration restrictions were announced, he was chuckling. "This is funny. It's really very funny," he told me, just so I knew it wasn’t. "[Trump] is going to do much worse than this. He thinks all that havoc and chaos is working. Ha. Ha. Ha.”

Dawn hadn't yet broken this morning when the US Senate voted to roll back a rule that made it harder for US energy companies to pay bribes in developing countries.

The move is hailed as a victory for oil, gas and mining companies. House Republicans had already voted to repeal the rule Wednesday, so the rollback goes to President Donald Trump's desk for his signature.

First it was the zucchinis.  

Then the iceberg lettuce. 

Then even the satsumas, those small mandarin oranges. 

That's when The World's reporter in London, Leo Hornak, says he really got hungry: "I'm at the epicenter of a zucchini famine. An iceberg lettuce drought."    

Britain is in the middle of a vegetable crisis due to poor growing conditions in southern Europe, where many of these vegetables are cultivated during the winter months.  

US President Donald Trump's immigration ban has affected people across the world, including politicians from some of the United States' closest allies. 

Nadhim Zahawi is not an obvious security threat to the US or the United Kingdom. As the elected member of Parliament for Stratford-on-Avon (Shakespeare's birthplace), he is a prominent member of Britain's governing Conservative Party, and sits on Parliament's Foreign Affairs Sub-Committee.

Get with the program or get out.

That was the stark message from White House spokesman Sean Spicer on Monday in response to news that State Department officials have drafted a memo of dissent. The memo was leaked to the Lawfare blog.  

It's been a week of "will he or won't he" (he being President Donald Trump). And the topic? The use of torture in interrogations with terrorism suspects.

In an interview with ABC on Wednesday, the president said waterboarding "absolutely works," but by Friday, the president stepped back — just a bit. While he said he believed torture and other tactics, euphemistically referred to as "enhanced interrogation," worked, he said he'd allow his defense secretary, former Marine Gen. James Mattis, to "override" him.

More than 2 million people worldwide took to the streets over the weekend to demand women's rights. Now that everyone turned out, what's next? How do you turn a march into a movement?

The Women's March organizers have been planning those next steps for the past few months. 

"There are already things happening right after the march," explains Linda Sarsour, executive director of the Arab American Organization of New York, and co-chair of the Women's March on Washington. 

It’s fair to say that facts are taking a beating during President Donald Trump's first few days on the job.

There were the claims and counterclaims about the size of the Inauguration Day crowd in Washington, and whether it rained or not when Trump spoke.

On Saturday, the president praised the intelligence agencies at the CIA's headquarters — just days after comparing their work to Nazi Germany.

There were attacks on the media.

And somewhere along the line, falsehoods got relabeled as "alternative facts."

President Donald Trump has taken office, and in his inaugural speech he called for loyalty — to the United States, and to one another.

All this kid wanted for Christmas was to be at Trump's inauguration

Jan 20, 2017

People trickled onto the National Mall before sunset Thursday, many wearing red hats, stopping for photos at a fenced area with a clear view of the Capitol Building to the east and the Washington Monument to the west.

A young, bearded man holding a sign that said "Not my president" stepped up on a barrier wall.

The loose crowd burst into boos and cheers, almost by command. Some of them started bickering. Insulting each other.

And an eager boy in a black suit — and a red hat — called on his mom to look at the commotion.

From Mauritania: A song for breast cancer awareness

Jan 18, 2017

Women's health is an important issue for singer Noura Mint Seymali. Breast cancer awareness, specifically.

Noura Mint Seymali is from Mauritania, in West Africa. And she wants to make sure women, especially women in Africa, get their annual screenings.

I had the opportunity to meet Seymali last fall before a show. She told me "I've wanted to write about this subject for a long time." She wanted to raise awareness, in part, because her mother died of breast cancer.

Seeing a rise in the visibility of LGBT and women's rights movements in their country, Peruvian conservatives responded with a "March for Heterosexual Pride."

The day Princess Diana stepped into an active minefield

Jan 13, 2017

On Jan. 15, 1997, one of the world's most famous women walked through an active minefield in Angola, and detonated a mine in front of an audience of international reporters, with the help of a land mine removal expert.

"I did not want to be on the front page of the news the next day," that mine removal expert, Paul Heslop, recently told the BBC, "as the man who'd blown up Princess Diana."

During World War II, the US Army came up with an idea to boost soldier morale: musicals. 

They were designed for the soldiers themselves to perform in the field.

For the past few days, some of those shows have been performed for the first time since the war. The stage is not on Broadway, but another venue in New York City: a former aircraft carrier, now docked on the Hudson River and known as the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum.

This is the official poem of 2016

Dec 31, 2016

This has been a tough year.

All sorts of news publications have even asked if it was the “Worst Year Ever.”

It’s been the year of a contentious US election season. The year of Brexit. The year of terrorist attacks all over the world.

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