The World

Monday - Friday 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman
  • Local Host Mark Wozniak

Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is. The World is heard on over 300 stations across North America.

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When I first bought Zoe, my poodle mix, I had high hopes for her future.

I was convinced she’d be an astrophysicist like Mr. Peabody on "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show." 

But it’s been three years, and while Zoe has had plenty of time to think, she has made zero progress on her time machine.

So now, I'm looking at backup careers for her.

Ziynda Kamte says she looked out the bus window the whole way to Cape Town.

She says she never stopped looking back. She was terrified that he would pop into her view, coming to get her and their two kids.

“My husband — he changed,” Kamte explains. “He started being abusive, beating me, treating me like nothing. There were days in which he would come home at 4 a.m. And he just wanted us to jam into it, and make love.”

Montreal's iconic Olympic Stadium has undergone a temporary transformation into a refugee welcome center.

The stadium has agreed to house about 450 asylum-seekers for a couple of months while the government figures out what to do next.

On Wednesday, the first busloads of people arrived, and now they are sleeping on cots, in a hallway, by the concession stands.

“The ambiance is camplike,” says Mireille Paquet, an immigration policy expert at Concordia University in Montreal, “but for now at least they're safe.”

Each week on The World, we feature a unique selection of music. And most every week, we put together the highlights for you here. 

WALK-OFF MUSIC FOR AN OLYMPIC STAR
Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt is currently the fastest man in the world. And this weekend, at the World Athletics Championships in London, Bolt will run his final 100 meters. There are years of musical tributes to him. 

After Arpaio guilty verdict, immigrant advocates want his legacy dismantled

Aug 3, 2017

News that former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was found guilty of criminal contempt of court spread quickly through Phoenix’s immigrant community on Monday. That evening, a dozen women — most of them of Mexican descent — stood in front of a giant balloon effigy of Arpaio wearing a striped prison uniform, and cheered.

Ya cayó, ya cayó, Arpaio ya cayó,” they chanted in Spanish, which roughly translates to “Arpaio has fallen.”

Here's a riddle for you. 

There's a man with roots in Sierra Leone, but who was born and raised in the US. If he creates music that has roots in the sounds of Sierra Leone, is it cultural appropriation? And what if a legendary Sierra Leonean roots musician gladly collaborates with him?

There were Indian troops at Dunkirk, too

Aug 2, 2017

"Dunkirk" has been the surprise box office hit of the summer. It recounts the tale of how the beaten British army escaped the Germans at the beginning of World War II, from a beach at Dunkirk, in northern France.

It’s a surprise hit in the US considering the fact that there's not a single American character in it. America wouldn't even be fighting in northwest Europe for another four years.

But it’s not the absence of an American angle that has caused a minor stink. Commentators in Britain and India are complaining that no Indian soldiers are portrayed in the movie.

Being 'endlessly sorry' may not put an end to VW's emissions scam troubles

Aug 2, 2017

Volkswagen’s CEO Martin Winterkorn has said he's ‘endlessly sorry’ that his company rigged the pollution control systems of millions of its diesel cars to show bogus emission levels during tests.

The company's US business chief, Michael Horn, admits VW "totally screwed up" and dramatically mislead the public and regulators. “Our company was dishonest with the EPA, and the California Air Resources Board and with all of you," Horn said at an auto industry event in New York.

Forget the seven deadly sins. In the universe of President Donald Trump, there is but a single deed more grievous than all the others.

It’s leaking.

Talking out of school — so to speak — is strictly verboten within the Trump inner circle. But it keeps happening.

This time, it was a talk by Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and one of his top advisers at the White House. Kushner was speaking to a group of congressional interns on Monday. They were told not to record the Q&A with the president's son-in-law.

We love music here at The World, and we love to share our latest favorites with you. From a feminist and rebel in Buenos Aries to a Latin-funk act in Austin, give a listen to some of what we loved in July.

Korea's G-Dragon is on tour, but not for long

Korean pop star G-Dragon is drawing big crowds in the US. But he may not be on the scene for long. He's about to start his compulsory military service in Korea.

The Creator’s game. That's what the Haudenosaunee Nation, which straddles the US and Canada, calls lacrosse.

And they should know — they invented the game.

This month, the women's national team went to England to compete in the Lacrosse World Cup, and they were able to travel on their tribal passports.

For the past few years, humanitarian workers have been carrying out rescues of migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to Europe — but a new group wants to put a stop to it.

A dozen mostly 20-somethings from Europe are trying to head out to sea to investigate and possibly disrupt the rescue operations, aiming to prevent more migrants from reaching Europe’s shores.

What is Defend Europe?

When Giovana Xavier looked at the lineup of writers who would attend FLIP 2016, the International Literary Festival of Paraty, she held her breath. Not one black woman author was invited.

“I felt overlooked, left behind; I felt anger and pain. I wondered how could I turn those feelings into something creative, something beautiful, how could we evolve? That's what history is all about,” said Xavier, a university professor at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro who is behind the Intelectuais Negras group, a nonprofit that relies on the "commitment of black women activists."

Opportunity and outrage at Canada's oil sands

Jul 20, 2017

In the early 20th century it was Canada that imported oil from the United States. Now it’s the other way around. The US gets more oil from Canada than any other country. But that might be news to a lot of Americans.

I don’t think most people realize that we get most of our energy imports from Canada,” says Denise Hamsher, director of planning at Enbridge Energy Company, which builds pipelines.

In fact, Hamsher says, 20 percent of our crude oil imports now come from Canada.

On Monday night, fans of the reality show "The Bachelorette" saw something rare on prime-time reality TV: a practicing Sikh.

One of the finalists, Dean Unglert, took his date, Rachel Lindsay, to meet his father, whom he had not seen for two years.

"I am doing my best to make sure she's as prepared as possible," Unglert said, "but I haven't seen my father in two years so I'm equally nervous for myself and Rachel walking into this situation."

International experts investigating the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico in 2014 were targeted with spyware sold to the government, cybersecurity experts said this week.

Adding to a snowballing scandal over spying on journalists, activists and other public figures in Mexico, computer security experts confirmed that the independent investigation into the disappearance and alleged massacre — an atrocity that drew worldwide condemnation — was targeted with highly invasive spyware known as Pegasus.

What a manly week it’s been!

In Kiev, assassinations are becoming commonplace

Jun 30, 2017

An explosion that killed a top Ukrainian military intelligence official in his car on Tuesday wasn’t the only high-profile assassination that’s struck Kiev lately.

In fact, the killing of Col. Maskym Shapoval wasn’t even the only car bomb attack — nor the only assassination the Ukrainian government has blamed on Russia.

At least five attempted or successful assassinations have targeted Ukrainian officials or other prominent figures in Ukraine in the past year.

Yulia Galiamina, a well-respected Russian opposition leader, has been recovering from a concussion at the neurosurgical department of Botkin Hospital, where an ambulance brought her after an opposition rally earlier this month.

A Moscow policeman with the OMON special unit had smashed Galiamina’s face, breaking her teeth and damaging her jaw. But the accident did not break her will and her stamina: Even in a hospital bed with a hellish headache, she continued to organize a new anti-government rally.

The battle is still raging in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul.

ISIS militants are cornered in the Old City. Iraqi and coalition forces are advancing slowly, capturing as little as one city block per day — if that. And ISIS fighters continue to strike back. On Wednesday, they seemed to detonate explosives at Mosul's 12th-century mosque. That iconic structure — with its famous leaning minaret — is now in ruins.

Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, left Mosul on Tuesday. He says ISIS is using everything it has to hold on.

Mexican women lead initiatives to rescue native tongues

Jun 21, 2017

When Gabriela Badillo traveled to Mérida, Yucatán, more than a decade ago, she encountered children who were timid about speaking the Mayan language. As she later came to understand, fear and discrimination were factors that affected the home teaching and use of the region’s native tongue.

“Children were a bit embarrassed to speak Mayan. ... Some mothers opted to not teach them the native tongue to avoid discrimination,” Badillo recalled.

The US shares the blame for a massacre in Mexico

Jun 20, 2017

The "war on drugs" has been part of American policy for so long that it's sometimes difficult to remember that the DEA wages that war every day, on both sides of the border with Mexico.

But it's incredibly difficult to counter the power cartels can hold over the Mexican government, and when things wrong, there are deadly reprecussions. 

Pakistanis go wild after cricket triumph over India

Jun 19, 2017

Pakistanis went wild Sunday after a surprise sporting triumph over its archrival, India.

“Cricket is the blood and heart of our nation,” says journalist Bina Shah, in the Pakistani city of Karachi. “We are so excited when we win and so devastated when we lose.”

The Pakistani national team stunned the cricket world by beating India in the final of an international tournament called the Champions Trophy, in London.

'Letters from Iraq' told through music

Jun 14, 2017

We're excited to share a new collaboration today. We're calling it "FutureFolk." The series is in partnership with the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

To help kick things off, we turn to Rahim AlHaj, an Iraqi-American composer and oud player. He has a new album out called "Letters from Iraq."

AlHaj lives in New Mexico now, but the songs on the album are inspired by actual letters sent by people in Iraq.

Russia roiled by protests against Putin and corruption

Jun 13, 2017

On Monday, thousands joined protests in cities across the length of Russia — from Vladivostok on the Pacific coast to St. Petersburg on the Baltic Sea, and from Murmansk in the Arctic north to the Olympic city of Sochi in the south.

Citizens were protesting against Vladimir Putin’s government and its corruption. 

In Moscow, the protests turned violent, with police using tear gas to try to disperse the demonstrators. Hundreds of people have been arrested.

While Washington and the media were preoccupied with James Comey hearings and Donald Trump press conferences this week, what else was going on that we didn't hear about? Or, ought to be paying closer attention to?

Nick Burns, the undersecretary of state for political affairs under George W. Bush, is a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School. The World's Marco Werman caught up with him so he could remind us about some issues that may have been overshadowed by the latest drama in Washington.

Trump's barbed condolences land with a thud in Iran

Jun 8, 2017

The lights will go dark on the Eiffel Tower tonight as a tribute to the victims of Wednesday's terrorist attack in Tehran. 

Still, many Iranians say they're not feeling the sort of outpouring of support and sympathy that usually follows an ISIS assault. 

"Honestly, I didn't expect the people of the world to be so quiet about it," says Tehran resident Roya Saadat. "My friends on Facebook, they felt sorry, but we saw on social media that some countries, especially Arab countries, were happy about it." 

Juanes has a new album out. It's called "Mis Planes Son Amarte." And in my humble opinion, it stands out for several reasons.

First, it’s really good. Juanes made the album with help from some young hip-hop producers from his hometown of Medellín, Colombia. And that collaboration helps many of the songs sound both edgy and rooted in Colombian musical tradition at the same time. You can hear that mix on “El Ratico,” featuring Colombian American singer Kali Uchis.

The recent attack in Portland, Oregon, has gotten many thinking about the kind of bravery it takes to jump in and help someone being harassed. And also the kind of bravery it takes to go out of your home wearing a visible sign that you're a Muslim.

Both forms of bravery were on display in Portland when two men died trying to help a couple of young women on a train, one of them wearing a hijab.

Greece's economic crisis has been going on for nearly a decade, so it may seem like old news. But for the people who live there, the disaster hasn’t faded — it’s only been compounded by the refugee crisis, with thousands of migrants from the Middle East landing on the shores of Lesbos since 2015.

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