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Looking for change at Google

Jul 16, 2015
Nova Safo

Google announces second-quarter financial results after the closing bell on Thursday. Investors, who have been worried about how much the tech giant is bringing in and how much it's spending, will be paying close attention to see if Google's reining in costs.

Irvine gets rid of city's living wage

Jul 16, 2015
Caitlin Esch

The city of Los Angeles has a new minimum wage. It’ll go up to $15 an hour over the next five years. But just 40 miles south of L.A.,  the city of Irvine has taken a different approach. The city council voted recently to repeal its local living wage ordinance that applies to contractors providing services like street cleaning, security and landscaping.

It's been a tough week for Broadway

Jul 15, 2015
Molly Wood

It's been a tough week or so on Broadway. You train all your life to get to the big stage, you're pouring your heart out up there, singing, dancing and sweating, and in the audience, the folks who probably paid a couple hundred bucks to be there are texting away like they're hanging out at Starbucks. 

A couple memorable incidents recently: one guy jumped up on stage and tried to plug his phone in to what turned out to be a fake outlet on the set. 

Greeks feel 'betrayed' by German leadership

Jul 15, 2015
Molly Wood

What's it like to be in Greece today? We talked to Elena Karanatis, who helped produce Marketplace's broadcast from Athens this week, and asked her about the International Monetary Fund's statement that it will not back a Greek bailout deal that does not involve debt relief. 

“People don’t think that the IMF is the worst villain anymore," Karanatis says. Now Greek ire rests on the German leadership, she says. “Some people feel really betrayed.… They think that the German leadership is treating Greece in a hostile way.”

Kim Adams

A couple of failed commercial launches of cargo to the International Space Station have members of Congress asking questions and researchers like Michael Fortenberry astonished at their bad luck.

Fortenberry had a $90,000 camera on the cargo flight that was supposed to go on the space station, along with 35 hard drives to store the images it collected. 

“The camera would record meteors when they enter the atmosphere at night," he says.

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Jul 15, 2015

Airing on Friday, July 15, 2015: The International Monetary Fund says it won't support a Greek deal that doesn't include debt relief. We explain how debt relief works, and why it is a) so central to this issue, and b) so contentious, both economically and politically. Next: the Department of Labor has waded into the ongoing fight over what types of workers should be considered employees in the sharing economy. Though the guidance is not a formal change in policy, a 15-page memo says the definition of employee isn’t quite as narrow as some firms might prefer.

Molly Wood

President Barack Obama announced a new initiative Wednesday to continue nationwide expansion of high-speed internet access. The project, ConnectHome, will bring high-speed broadband to low income families. ConnectHome is a collaboration between private sector businesses, the federal government and communities, and will launch in 27 states.

Run the Jewels on the confederate flag, money and teenagers

Jul 15, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary and Jenny Ament

Marketplace's Lizzie O'Leary interviewed Run the Jewels this week, a hip-hop duo formed by New York City-based rapper/music producer El-P and Atlanta-based rapper Killer Mike in 2013. Killer Mike and El-P are willing to talk about the ways they wasted money in their respective youths (drugs, strippers, generally being young and dumb).

The rules governing the Chinese stock market

Jul 15, 2015
Linda Lin

The modern Chinese stock market is 25 years old, and it's having growing pains. The Communist Party acts like a hovering parent, steering the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges clear of life’s bumps and curves instead of letting the markets work out their own problems.

Technically the Chinese stock market is mostly closed to foreign investors and shouldn’t directly sway world markets, but global confidence has waned since mid-June, when the Shanghai Composite Index started a 30 percent nosedive.

PODCAST: The egg crisis caused by the bird flu

Jul 15, 2015
Adrienne Hill

Prior to Fed Chair Janet Yellen's testimony in front of Congress, we'll talk about the released transcript of her statement. Plus, Netflix reports earnings this week. It’s counting on expanding overseas, particularly in China, but how’s that looking? And the bird flu crisis is winding down with no new reported since June 17th. But for bakers, there's still a big egg crisis.

Netflix wants to be in every country

Jul 15, 2015
Adam Allington

The online video-streaming giant Netflix is scheduled to report second-quarter earnings after the bell on Wednesday.

Netflix forecasts that it will gain some 26 million international subscribers in 50 countries by the end of this year, and hopes to operate around the world by the end of 2016.

“The main thing for them at this stage is just the raw subscriber growth numbers,” says Jim Nail, a business-to-consumer analyst at Forrester Research.

Marketplace Morning Report Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Jul 15, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Wednesday, July 15, 2015: Greece's parliament will vote today on the rescue package agreed to earlier in the week. But yesterday, the IMF released a paper warning the bailout plan may not work without more debt relief for Greece from the eurozone. More on that. Plus, with the lifting of sanctions in Iran potentially on the way, we took a look at how long will it could take for Iran to increase its oil production enough to affect global prices and show up in gas prices here in the U.S.

Greece's economic outlook, from the streets of Athens

Jul 14, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Hayley Hershman

Although immediate danger of an economic collapse has passed, Greece and its people have a long way to go before things feel comfortable, or even normal.

In Athens, the attitude about Greece’s future is a mixed bag. There are citizens like Olga Karastathi, on the one hand. Karastathi opened up Chemin Bakery in Athens just as Greece was getting into economic trouble despite the turmoil, and she’s still optimistic.

Marketplace for Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Jul 14, 2015

Airing on Tuesday, July 14, 2015: From Athens, Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal talks to Nick Voglis, a sandwich-shop owner, about the changes to his business and life wrought by the Greek debt crisis. Plus, on the day a deal is announced with Iran, we look at one aspect of the untapped potential it presents: its people. Demographics are on Iran’s side right now. Iran has a young, educated, mostly middle-class population — what opportunities does this offer the country? What does it offer U.S. and other international companies wanting to do business there? We explore. 

Three jobs, a family and uncertainty

Jul 14, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Kai Ryssdal is reporting live from Athens. He talks with Tonia Korka, a mother and research associate at the Hellenic Institute of International and Foreign Law, about her job prospects in the future.

Kai Ryssdal

Kai Ryssdal is reporting live from Athens. He talks with Nick Voglis, owner of Trends Subs and Salads in Greece, about what it's like trying keep a small sandwich shop afloat during economic turmoil.

Little Athens has to cope with the crisis, too

Jul 14, 2015
James Perla

The Greek debt crisis has consequences for businesses outside of Greece too. In the Astoria neighborhood of Queens, New York  — also known as Little Athens — some store owners have higher prices for many products, which is hurting business. 

Dianna Loiselle of Telly's Taverna says the products she buys from Greece have spiked since the economic crisis began.

“The olives we buy were about $28, $29, and now they’re $52,” she says. 

Antony Fidanakis of Titan Foods has also been experiencing price hikes at his store.

Tourism in an economic crisis

Jul 14, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal is reporting live from Athens. He spoke with several tourists at the Acropolis of Athens to get their reactions to the crisis in Greece.

PODCAST: A date with Pluto

Jul 14, 2015
Adrienne Hill

First up, we'll talk about how the lifting of sanctions on Iran could affect the global oil market. Next: the apparel industry is looking to Africa as its next manufacturing base for cheap clothing. Ethiopian wages are one third those in Bangladesh. All that needs to happen is to persuade manufacturers to build factories there, install an infrastructure, train a workforce, and solve shipping challenges. Plus, we'll talk about the New Horizons probe and its date with dwarf planet Pluto.

Oculus Rift could help people with vision problems

Jul 14, 2015
Daniel Wagner

The Oculus Rift, a virtual reality headset that makes users feel like they're in another space by filling their field of vision with 3D video, doesn't have a price tag yet.

The consumer headset will probably set gamers back a few hundred dollars when it goes on sale early next year. But gamers won’t be the only customers. Scientists have also been exploring virtual reality with the Oculus Rift. 

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Jul 14, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Tuesday, July 14, 2015: First up, we'll talk with Lindsey Turrentine, Editor-in-Chief at CNET.com, about Comcast’s new option for cordcutters – a service called Stream. We'll also hear about the medical uses for the Oculus Rift. The virtual reality technology will be available to gamers in early 2016, but it may end up benefiting older, visually impaired non-gamers too.

Big bank outlook: slow and steady

Jul 14, 2015
Mitchell Hartman

Bank earnings for Q2 2015 are up this week: JP Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo report their revenues and profits on Tuesday, July 14; Bank of America on Wednesday, July 15; and Goldman Sachs and Citigroup on Thursday, July 16.

Over the past several years, the biggest U.S. banks have been through financial crisis, massive bailouts and multi-billion-dollar lawsuits over their mortgage-lending and investment practices. 

Marketplace

Airing on Tuesday, July 14, 2015: After years of negotiations, Iran and six major world powers have reached a deal over the country's nuclear program. The agreement aims to curb Iran's production of nuclear weapons in exchange for the lifting of certain sanctions. This could mean a huge bump in Iran's oil exports. More on that. Next: Big banks report earnings this week. JP Morgan Chase is Tuesday. Later in the week, Goldman Sach and Wells Fargo release their earnings. Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman explains what banks are facing that could influence their earnings outlook.

A street-level view of of the Greek debt crisis

Jul 13, 2015
Marketplace staff

Greece has finally settled on a deal that keeps the country in the eurozone and out of a sudden banking collapse. The agreement in Brussels on Monday calls for a lifeline from Europe’s wealthy powers in exchange for budget cuts and tax hikes; Greece must pass those reforms by Wednesday. Although Greece may have avoided total economic collapse, there will be a long period of adjustment for Greek citizens who already have been living with austerity measures for five years.

Marketplace for Monday, July 13, 2015

Jul 13, 2015

Airing on Monday, July 13, 2015: Marketplace is reporting to you live from Greece, where we explore the details of the Greek bailout and talk to citizens about their struggles coping with the country's debt crisis. Plus: A look at Greece's currency woes. When it was introduced, the euro was a uniting force in Europe — a currency shared across borders. But it has morphed into a weapon, perhaps one just as powerful as any used in centuries’ worth of European battles.

How do you pronounce Greece's favorite food?

Jul 13, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Remember Vassilis Anastassopoulos, the restaurant worker we spoke with at the top of our first show in Athens? He talked to us a little about gyros.

"It's different kind of meat with pita bread, and it's the No. 1 most favorite food," he said.

How the euro went from unifying force to divisive one

Jul 13, 2015
David Brancaccio

The euro hit the streets of Europe in 2002 with much fanfare. It was seen at the time by many as a tangible, unifying force.

Then things changed.

“The euro has been much more of a divisive force since the crisis,” says Carmen Reinhart, professor of international finance at Harvard, referring to the global financial crisis. 

The euro became divisive because the different economies of different countries needed the currency to do different things.

Syriza promised hope, but it has yet to come

Jul 13, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal is reporting live from Athens. He talks to Syriza party member Anastasia Giamali about Monday's eurozone deal for a Greek bailout. 

Click on the media player above to hear the interview. 

2 Greek women, far apart on the bailout issue

Jul 13, 2015
Sam Beard

The past two tumultuous weeks in Greece were triggered by the Athens government's decision to reject a bailout package from its creditors and then to put the issue to a referendum.

The move caused consternation in European circles. The European Central Bank withheld further support for Greece. The country's banks were closed, and many Greek businesses ground to a standstill. The crisis deepened when 61 percent of the people voted "no" in the referendum to not accept the bailout deal.

PODCAST: Dude, where's my sewage?

Jul 13, 2015
Adrienne Hill

After marathon, overnight negotiations, there's a deal that could keep Greece in the eurozone. More on that. And Amazon celebrates its 20th anniversary with a one-day sale aimed at members of the fee-based service. But more than offering deep discounts, the event is another way the retailer hopes to grow business. Plus, we'll talk about using sewage to determine how much a population is consuming legal versus illegal marijuana.

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