Environment

Debunking the Myths About Hunger

Jan 9, 2016

In their new book, World Hunger: 10 Myths, Frances Moore Lappé and coauthor Joseph Collins make the case that there’s plenty of food to go around, but it’s just not getting to those who need it most. Lappé and host Steve Curwood discuss how tackling inequality and expanding democracy can feed the world. (published January 8, 2016)

A Mainer's Family Wintertime Traditions

Jan 7, 2016

Denny Breau, a singer/songwriter from Maine, joins host Steve Curwood during these cold winter months to discuss some of the moments that warm his heart. He shares stories about one of his favorite holiday meals, ice-fishing, his Acadian family origins, and traditions of song that span the generations. (published January 1, 2016)

Superbowl Sundae

Jan 7, 2016

For many children, some vital grown-up rituals can be very tedious. So, as storyteller Jay O’Callahan shares with host Steve Curwood, the imaginative youngster Mary creates her own unusual but delicious version of Superbowl Sunday, with sundae toppings. (published January 1, 2016)

Mary’s New Year’s Eve

Jan 7, 2016

Jay O’Callahan sat down with host Steve Curwood and shared some tales about his family and how an imaginative young girl creates her own special celebration as the guest of honor at a very exclusive party. (published January 1, 2016)

Christmas Candles

Jan 7, 2016

Master storyteller Jay O’Callahan joins host Steve Curwood to share some tales about his family during the holiday season. O’Callahan recalls his community’s tradition of Christmas caroling and how it brought hope to his mother in a time of darkness and for Christmases to come. (published January 1, 2016)

A Green Message for the Next Generation

Jan 7, 2016

Tem Blessed, an environmentally and socially-conscious hiphop artist, sat down with host Steve Curwood to discuss how contemporary music can communicate the importance of the environment and sustainability to young audiences. He illustrates this with two of his own pieces: “I am the bee” and “Now is the time.” (published January 1, 2016)

Living on Earth: January 1, 2016

Jan 7, 2016

Christmas Candles / Mary’s New Year’s Eve / Superbowl Sundae / A Green Message for the Next Generation / A Mainer's Family Wintertime Traditions

Christmas Candles

Jan 2, 2016

Master storyteller Jay O’Callahan joins host Steve Curwood to share some tales about his family during the holiday season. O’Callahan recalls his community’s tradition of Christmas caroling and how it brought hope to his mother in a time of darkness and for Christmases to come. (published January 1, 2016)

A Mainer's Family Wintertime Traditions

Jan 2, 2016

Denny Breau, a singer/songwriter from Maine, joins host Steve Curwood during these cold winter months to discuss some of the moments that warm his heart. He shares stories about one of his favorite holiday meals, ice-fishing, his Acadian family origins, and traditions of song that span the generations. (published January 1, 2016)

A Green Message for the Next Generation

Jan 2, 2016

Tem Blessed, an environmentally and socially-conscious hiphop artist, sat down with host Steve Curwood to discuss how contemporary music can communicate the importance of the environment and sustainability to young audiences. He illustrates this with two of his own pieces: “I am the bee” and “Now is the time.” (published January 1, 2016)

Superbowl Sundae

Jan 2, 2016

For many children, some vital grown-up rituals can be very tedious. So, as storyteller Jay O’Callahan shares with host Steve Curwood, the imaginative youngster Mary creates her own unusual but delicious version of Superbowl Sunday, with sundae toppings. (published January 1, 2016)

Mary’s New Year’s Eve

Jan 2, 2016

Jay O’Callahan sat down with host Steve Curwood and shared some tales about his family and how an imaginative young girl creates her own special celebration as the guest of honor at a very exclusive party. (published January 1, 2016)

Saving the world’s tropical forests was a central element of the climate change agreement that emerged from COP21 in Paris. Delegates from all nations seem to have finally reached consensus on one point: Saving the planet from climate catastrophe is not achievable without also saving the Earth’s tropical forests.

One way of accomplishing this that has been around for a decade is the UN-REDD program.

Wild turkey survival study to continue

Dec 29, 2015
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Local hunters may have noticed fewer gobbling noises on some excursions. That’s because the wild turkey population in New York has been on the decline for quite some time, according to the State Department of Environmental Conservation.

At the Paris climate conference, the primary focus was on the negotiators who represented more than 190 countries working to hammer out an agreement. But an equally, if not more, important process happened outside the main event.

“Across a spectrum of issues, often outside of the convention, remarkable working coalitions have now formed and are making very substantial pledges,” explains Rachel Kyte, the World Bank’s special envoy for climate change.

When Canada's newly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to Paris to participate in the worldwide environmental negotiations, he brought with him a clear message: Canada is now backing federal and provincial climate protection.

For many Americans, it's the latest sign that Canada's new leader, from welcoming Syrian refugees to quelling Islamophobia, is somehow representing an American ideal as well.

Stories of Hope from Noa Baum

Dec 26, 2015

Israeli-American storyteller Noa Baum believes that sharing stories keeps hope alive, and she has two examples to demonstrate. First there’s a traditional, Eastern European tale about the importance of stories, and the true recollection of a Pakistani who discovers that his family tree includes people from all over the world and of all faiths. (published December 25, 2015)

Slaves in the American South sang and shared stories to keep their sense of hope alive. Husband and wife duo Sparky and Rhonda Rucker share stories of what slaves could expect at the holiday season, and a hog tale of the trickster High John the Conqueror, along with old-time spirituals. (published December 25, 2015)

Living on Earth: December 25, 2015

Dec 26, 2015

Aine Minogue Celebrates Hope In Celtic Holiday Traditions / Sparky and Rhoda Rucker Celebrate Hope in the Traditions of Slaves / Stories of Hope from Noa Baum

Irish harpist Aine Minogue launches the Living on Earth holiday special, with stories of mid-winter traditions. Aine and host Steve Curwood discuss the importancee of visiting friends, decorating with evergreens, and summoning longer days, and she plays traditional tunes of the season and sings about a creature from the Land Beneath the Sea. (published December 25, 2015)

In Paris, nearly 200 countries ratified an agreement outlining climate action commitments aimed at restricting global temperature rise to 2 degrees or less. Host Steve Curwood analyzes final remarks from Secretary of State John Kerry on the power of American business, former UNFCCC critic Claudia Salerno of Venezuela’s preamble, and a “technical error” which could have derailed everything.

With a new climate agreement in place, the question is can they be achieved. Mark Hertsgaard, Environment Correspondent for the Nation Magazine tells host Steve Curwood that to keep the global temperature rise “well below 2 degrees Celsius”, we’re going to need to put an end to fossil fuel subsidies and stop drilling for oil and gas and totally decarbonize the global economy. (published December 18, 2015)

Cash flow for sustainable development is essential to make the Paris Agreement reality, yet the accord doesn't include firm financial commitments from developed countries. Lord Nicholas Stern tells Host Steve Curwood how the Agreement will likely mobilize public and private investment to help developing countries. (published December 18, 2015)

The Climate Movement in the Streets

Dec 19, 2015

While delegates finalized the language on the Paris Agreement, climate activists gathered in the streets demanding greater efforts to stop fossil fuel expansion and protect the people most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Living on Earth’s Emmett Fitzgerald recorded an audio postcard from the protests. (published December 18, 2015)

The Wooden Sword / A Story of Peace

Dec 19, 2015

Storyteller Noa Baum collects traditional tales from all over the world and creates original stories. Rooted in Afghan-Jewish traditions, “The Wooden Sword” shows us how faith can help us find happiness, even when we are faced with adversity. (published December 18, 2015)

After watching the failures of the UN negotiations in Copenhagen in 2009 and the failure in 2010 of the US Congress to pass even weak legislation addressing climate change, former NPR journalist Wen Stephenson had what he calls his ‘holy crap!’ moment on climate change — and he became a climate activist.

Now he has published a book, called What We’re Fighting for Now is Each Other: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Climate Justice.

Two degrees Celsius. It has become a familiar number to anyone who follows news about global warming and climate change.

Climate negotiators in Paris and others have repeatedly stated that limiting global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius, or about 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit, is a reasonable target for mitigating the worst effects of climate change. It was even written into the formal COP21 agreement reached over the weekend.

But there’s a problem with this number, according to one prominent scientist: It doesn’t make sense.

Living on Earth: December 11, 2015

Dec 13, 2015

Historic Climate Agreement Reached in Paris / Indigenous Peoples Fight for Their Rights at COP21 / Financing Forests to Cut Down on Carbon / Canada’s Bottom-up Approach to Cutting Carbon / Poetic Plea for the Marshall Islands

Historic Climate Agreement Reached in Paris

Dec 13, 2015

After working arduously for two weeks, COP21 delegates have adopted the ambitious Paris Agreement. Secretary of State John Kerry, White House Science Advisor John Holdren and Greenpeace International Executive Director Kumi Naidoo weigh in on the importance of these climate commitments and of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, rather than the earlier target of 2 degrees. Host Steve Curwood speaks with World Resources Institute Global Climate Director Jennifer Morgan about the contents of the final Paris Agreement. (published December 11, 2015)

Some common chemicals ingested during pregnancy could be associated with obesity in offspring, according to a new study.

Pages