Environment

greatlakesbeachsweep.org

Area shorelines received a facelift as volunteers descended upon 40 area sites for the 30th annual Great Lakes Beach Sweep.

Cookies, crackers, and other prepackaged favorites are stirring up more trouble than late night munching. Between one-third and one-half of all processed foods are made with palm oil, a preservative linked to damaging environmental effects on wildlife and the climate.

But a new focus on palm oil, and some interesting innovations, might help stop the destruction.

A major test case is underway in Ohio, where a utility company is trying to undo deregulation in an attempt to keep expensive and aging coal and nuclear plants online.

FirstEnergy pushed hard for deregulation back in 2008 and got a $6 billion payout from consumers to cover its stranded assets. Now, the company says it wants to be guaranteed revenues from expensive coal and nuclear power generation.

Citizens urged to become environmental watchdogs

Sep 18, 2015
WBFO file photo

A local group is empowering people to become environmental watchdogs in their own backyards. Citizen Science Community Resources is holding a free science workshop and conference Saturday, where participants can pop in anytime from 9:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.

General Mills, the $20 billion dollar-a-year, Minnesota-based food giant whose brands include Cheerios, Betty Crocker, Haagen Dazs, Pillsbury and Yoplait, has announced an increased commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to push for more sustainable practices.

An investigation into dangerous bacteria found in ground beef products suggests sustainably-sourced meat may be healthier for consumers and better for the environment.

Researchers from Consumer Reports bought about 485 pounds of ground beef in 26 different cities from about 100 different stores over a three-week period and had the samples tested for five different bacteria, as well as for levels of antibiotic-resistance.

Lake Erie water quality discussed at County Hall forum

Sep 14, 2015
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

An Erie County lawmaker welcomed several speakers to County Hall Monday morning to discuss the water quality of Lake Erie, and how the county may best invest in a cleanup.


New Orleans is still vulnerable to another big storm

Sep 14, 2015

As it approached New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina was one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded in the northern Gulf of Mexico. By the time it swept past the city and hammered the Mississippi coast, the storm had weakened.

Unfortunately, the defenses protecting New Orleans had also weakened. The result was a disaster of overwhelming proportions.

Chris Caya/WBFO News

Just off I-190 near GM's Tonawanda Engine Plant, there is an odd site out in the Niagara River. Yellow-colored heavy equipment can be seen working in the water near Strawberry Island. As WBFO's Chris Caya reports, it's part of a habitat restoration project that should benefit fish, wildlife and local residents.


The differences in thermal comfort between men and women in the workplace is a thing. In fact, it is actually the subject of more than 40 years of research by Cornell’s Alan Hedge.

“What that research showed, of course, was that women were experiencing more issues at the temperatures that were then being set in the environment,” Hedge says. 

A study recently published in the journal “Nature Climate Change” asserts that this is an issue that has been going on for decades. 

WBFO News file photo / WBFO News

A state campground in the Catskills may receive a few upgrades.

Florida's natural springs are changing — and disappearing

Sep 5, 2015

Late summer is a perfect time to go for an outdoor swim. Many in Florida, however, are finding that the crystal clear spring-fed swimming holes they used to frequent have turned dark with pollution and algae. 

“We have about 1,000 natural springs in Florida, artesian springs, and they are across-the-board suffering from reduced water volume flow rates and they are across-the-board polluted with nitrate nitrogen,” says Bob Knight, the director of the Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute, in Gainesville, Florida.

Obama has a plan to cut down on methane leaks

Sep 4, 2015

The Obama administration has been rolling out a series of new environmental regulations ahead of the UN climate summit later this year. Their latest effort calls for a more than 40 percent reduction in methane from new oil and gas wells.

Professor Pat Parenteau of the Vermont Law School says the new regulations are an important step in reducing climate change. 

Mike Desmond/wbfo news

The Buffalo River was a summer recreation hotspot Thursday, as a cruise boat carried a crowd celebrating 25 years of Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper, a key agency in turning a one-time industrial sewer into a waterway with kayaks, canoes, motorboats and sailboats.


The world’s most endangered marine mammal is a small porpoise called the vaquita — Spanish for little cow. The vaquita has been under threat for years, but now the poaching of a rare fish may be driving the tiny Mexican porpoise to extinction.

The vaquita lives only in the Gulf of California off the coast of Mexico. For years, Mexican fishermen have accidentally caught the five-foot porpoise in gillnets set for fish and shrimp. “This has driven the population from a size of about 500, 20 years ago to less than 100 today,” says Duke University professor Andy Read.

Courtesy Erie County Parks, Recreation and Forestry Facebook page

Erie County has a new Ranger Program aimed at improving safety and educational opportunities in county parks. While the program has been in the works for a while, it follows a number of accidents on the Eternal Flame Trail at Chestnut Ridge Park earlier this year, including one that took the life of a 14-year-old boy. 

In big cities and rural towns, many communities are beginning to use a concept called “Complete Streets” to make neighborhood and commercial streets friendlier for people. The policies behind these changes are new, but the problems and complaints they are addressing are often as old as the roads they aim to fix.

“Complete streets” look different in different places, but the idea is simple: Make transportation systems about people, so there is equal access for all forms of travel.

Summer in southeast Alaska is salmon season. As the days grow long, the iconic pink fish begin to run up rivers and streams, and the fishing economy jumps to life. But this summer, fishermen are worried that new mining development could put their livelihoods at risk.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Fish in Cattaraugus Creek could be swimming in new waters for the first time in almost a century.

Illegal trafficking of animals for Asian medicine is a rampant problem. Despite international protections, poachers slaughter millions of elephants, tigers and rhinos a year and sell their parts as cures for ailments ranging from headaches to cancer.

Now international groups are seeking to protect a small mammal that's trafficked more than those three combined and is on the brink of extinction: the pangolin.

The Hillary Clinton campaign goes solar

Aug 16, 2015

With polling that suggests two-thirds of voters want the next president to address climate change, Hillary Clinton has laid out an ambitious renewable energy plan while campaigning in Iowa and New Hampshire.

The present front-runner for the democratic nomination declared she would take action on day one of her presidential term.

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A local ski resort is being sued by its neighbors over noise and dust pollution coming from its property.


WBFO News file photo

Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz will sign legislation Wednesday to ban personal care products containing microbeads, the tiny pieces of plastic which can pass through sewage treatment plants and into open water and potentially into fish.


To avoid catastrophic global warming, scientists say the world must drastically cut greenhouse gas emissions — and that means slashing the use of fossil fuels. New numbers indicate that the change is already underway.

For the first time in history natural gas is now generating more electrical power than coal in America — a major milestone on the way to rebuilding the energy economy.

An ecosystem is like a giant game of Jenga — remove the wrong piece and the entire structure can collapse. The history of the black-tailed prairie dog and how its elimination altered the landscape of Mexico and the American West powerfully illustrates this principle.

Black-tailed prairie dogs once numbered in the billions across the grasslands of the Western US and Mexico, but ranchers essentially exterminated the rodent to make way for livestock. 

Chris Caya WBFO News

The cleanup of the Black Rock Channel in Buffalo is underway, thanks to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

Why dying bees may cause a public health problem

Aug 6, 2015

A new study examines the death, disease, and health issues humans might face if a worldwide decline in animal pollinators continues. 

Fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, honey: these are all nutrition-rich foods that are produced with the help of animal pollinators, especially bees. In fact, an estimated 35 percent of the world’s food is dependent on animal pollinators.

Mosquitoes are developing resistance to insecticides

Aug 4, 2015

Humans have used everything from screens to chemical repellants to protect themselves from mosquitoes and the diseases they carry. Now, however, scientists say mosquitoes are finding ways to adapt to insecticides and other recent changes in their environments.

A new study on mosquito adaptability has big ramifications for public health workers, and for anyone out on a warm night, trying to avoid both mosquito bites, and the itchiness and disease those bites might bring.

Pacific Northwest sturgeon suffer as worldwide demand for caviar soars

Aug 3, 2015

Caviar, prized as a luxury food, can sell for as much as $200 an ounce. Most caviar comes from the Caspian Sea, but the decline of sturgeon there is driving fishermen and poachers to fish populations in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia River.

Despite active policing and catch limits on sturgeon, poachers and traffickers still manage to pull black gold from the riverbed, threatening the fish’s survival. Global demand for black market caviar is putting the whole sturgeon population at risk.

Water supply in the West isn’t only about rain, or the lack thereof. A good deal of water scarcity issues have to do with decades-old policy on water issues and entrenched infrastructure.

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