Great Lakes Today

Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations, was created to highlight issues affecting the lakes. The main partners are WBFO (Buffalo), ideastream (Cleveland) and WXXI (Rochester). Other stations in the region will also contribute reports. Great Lakes Today is funded through a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Miller

When the Cuyahoga River caught fire on June 22, 1969, it badly scarred Cleveland’s image.  Some other polluted rivers were burning in American cities, but Cleveland’s fire was highlighted in Time magazine.  The river and city became the butt of jokes -- and the inspiration for a Randy Newman tune. But today, a new generation is embracing the “Burning River” name. 

National Park Service

On Tuesday, governors of the eight Great Lakes states approved a precedent-setting request by a Wisconsin city to take water from one of the lakes. The request sparked months of controversy.

National Park Service

This week, a decision is expected in a fight along the Great Lakes. Waukesha, Wisc., wants to draw water from the lakes. No one's ever made a request like that, and some worry that more will follow. Great Lakes Today Managing Editor Dave Rosenthal discusses the issue with Susan Bence of WUWM in Milwaukee.

Representatives from cities along the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River are gathering in Niagara Falls this week to grapple with a number of environmental issues. The meeting of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative includes discussions about climate change, drinking water, managing nutrients and invasive species.

Photo courtesy of State of NY

New at Canalside: a "Cool Globes" public art exhibition. The 12 sculptures offer messages for people and businesses to take action on climate change.

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said in a news release announcing the installation, “New York has led the nation on climate change and this project highlights our continued commitment to protecting our planet for future generations."

The globes will be on display until November.

Dave Rosenthal

Here's your chance to watch local officials grapple with water safety, climate change and other big issues. On Thursday and Friday, tune into the Great Lakes Now coverage of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative annual meeting. It's live from Niagara Falls. 

Downtown Rochester, N.Y., can feel a little removed from the Great Lakes. The front lawn of the Christ Church on East Avenue is almost 10 miles from the shores of Lake Ontario, which might be why some passers-by don’t recognize the lakes -- even when they’re standing right in front of them.

Environmental and state leaders in New York are calling on Ohio to get its phosphorous run-off into Lake Erie under control.

BY ELIZABETH MILLER

Security and rescue operations on Great Lakes waters are changing. The U.S. Coast Guard is planning to temporarily shut down eight Coast Guard stations around the Great Lakes. It’s the beginning of a larger transition aimed at improving the efficiency of stations around the nation. But Ashtabula, Ohio, doesn’t want to see its Coast Guard unit go. 


by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

The sharp scent of chemicals bites the air as Jason Krebill wades in a creek and pulls out two slippery, slimy, parasitic creatures.

He was holding dead adult sea lampreys one in each hand. They were about two feet long, with suction-cupped mouths, lined with nearly a dozen rows of sharp teeth.

The next time you’re taking a leisurely drive through the region’s Great Lakes watershed, you'll find some new signage displayed along the way.

U.S EPA

This month, the Ohio EPA could place the western Lake Erie basin on its impaired list, a biennial list of waters that do not meet state water quality standards. And with harmful algal blooms posing a threat to drinking and recreational waters every summer, advocates say there’s a clear need to clean up Lake Erie.  But is the impaired designation the solution?


Brian Meyer/WBFO

When you’re taking your boat out on the water this season, be sure you don’t bring along any hitchhikers.

When area residents say they’re going to pitch in to help keep the environment clean, they mean it. More than eight tons of litter, trash and debris was collected during the Spring Shoreline Sweep hosted by the Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper on April 23.

ANGELICA A. MORRISON / WBFO

A tiny fish has been making a big splash in local aquatic research. The emerald shiner is the focus of a research project at Buffalo State’s Great Lakes Center. The bite-sized specimen is only a few inches long, but it plays a big role in the local aquatic system.

ANGELICA A. MORRISON / WBFO

Joggers whisk by in pairs or with pets along the path at the Delaware Park Marcy Casino. It’s a typical late spring morning with trees budding, water fowl floating in Hoyt Lake and the sour aroma of the Scajaquada Creek wafting in the air.

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