immigration

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Daemen College played host Tuesday to a panel discussion on refugees, immigrants and President Donald Trump's policies concerning them.


Updated at 10:45 p.m.

President Trump blasted a federal judge's decision to temporarily halt his revised travel ban on Wednesday night, telling a campaign rally in Nashville, Tenn., that he wished he had stood his ground and fought for his original, much stricter executive order.

Local agency and its Iranian employee face visa dilemma

Feb 22, 2017
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

President Trump is expected to issue a revised executive order that again seeks to restrict travel from seven mostly-Muslim nations. The administration's desired immigration policies are leaving one local resident, and her employers, wondering if she'll be allowed to stay in the United States when her student visa expires.

Updated 5:25 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is releasing more on its plans to crack down on illegal immigration, enforcing the executive orders President Trump issued in late January. Those orders called for increased border security and stricter enforcement of immigration laws.

The Department of Homeland Security issued the new rules on Tuesday, laid out in two documents signed by Secretary John Kelly.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

Western New York Democratic Congressman Brian Higgins spoke with reporters Monday about immigration and congressional town halls. WBFO's Senior Reporter Eileen Buckley says the democratic lawmaker is unsure how those in Washington will find a "middle ground." 

WBFO News file photo

Several aid organizations and pro-immigrant groups are pressuring the Canadian government to pull out of a controversial program which turns away almost all refugees coming in through the United States.

Updated 9:05 p.m. ET with 9th Circuit appeals court delay

President Trump says his administration will continue to fight for his existing travel ban in the court system, and that he will also issue a new, "very comprehensive order" next week.

Trump provided no details on what that new order would entail, but said it would "comprehensively protect our country." The president made the remarks during a news conference Thursday at the White House.

courtesy Erin Heaney

Amidst the debate about immigration in the U.S., a recently-published report prepared by several research partners, including one from the University at Buffalo, challenges the claims that immigrants are a significant influence on the crime rate.


WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has joined 6 other state Attorney's General in testing the legality of another aspect of immigration enforcement.

Appeals Court Rejects Bid To Reinstate Trump's Travel Ban

Feb 9, 2017

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court has unanimously rejected a Trump administration request to allow its travel ban to take effect.

The three-judge appeals panel declined to overturn a lower court's order suspending the president's ban against entry into the United States by refugees and travelers from seven majority-Muslim nations.

Two lawyers, three judges, thousands of ordinary Americans: On Tuesday night, oral arguments in Washington v. Trump attracted an unusually large audience for audio-only legal proceedings.

The case centers on President Trump's controversial executive order that would temporarily bar all new refugees from entering the U.S., as well as visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

WBFO News file photo

Congressman Chris Collins has written a letter to the Department of Homeland Security, asking it to examine the biometric entry-exit system announced by the Trump administration for U.S. borders.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

President Trump's executive order on immigration is causing difficulties for some University at Buffalo students. WBFO's Senior Reporter Eileen Buckley spent time at UB's North campus to talk with students about the order that suspends travel from some international students. 

The New York Civil Liberties Union says they and fellow legal advocates have representatives on the ground to assist anyone still affected by President Donald Trump's immigration orders, including the one barring entry from a selected set of nations that the White House considers terror breeding grounds. Meanwhile, local workshops are being planned to assist any new arrivals by advising them of their rights.


WBFO's Mike Desmond

In a mosque on Buffalo's West Side filled with immigrants - many recent immigrants - there is concern about what President Trump's executive order on immigration will do to them, their dreams and their families.

Eileen Elibol / WBFO News

With Congress and the government re-opening in Washington today, there may be some clarity about immigration which has been tangled all weekend.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET Sunday

Federal Judge Ann Donnelly in Brooklyn, N.Y. granted a request by the American Civil Liberties Union and issued a stay late Saturday on the deportations of valid visa holders after they have landed at a U.S. airport. The ruling by Donnelly temporarily blocks President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration signed Friday.

According to NPR's Hansi Lo Wang:

Erie County Legislature

Across the country, many municipalities are grappling with the idea of challenging federal law and providing forms of sanctuary to undocumented immigrants. One local legislator believes proposals for sanctuary policies are on the rise, and is out to ensure Erie County doesn’t adopt one.


WBFO file photo/Eileen Koteras Elibol

President-Elect Donald Trump, in his first broadcast interview since winning last Tuesday's election, spoke of his plan to deport as many as three million undocumented immigrants with criminal convictions shortly after taking office. Local legal experts say that's unlikely to happen, given an existing backlog of deportation cases.


Love and marriage and the immigration process can be very related.

Forum focuses on refugee challenges, misconceptions

Feb 3, 2016
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Addressing the myths about refugees. That was the focus of a panel discussion held Tuesday at Daemen College, where an audience of nearly 200 people heard about the challenges facing immigrants, including just how hard it is to achieve asylum status in the U.S.


WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

Across the world, people want to live and work in the U-S. Many are already here in colleges and graduate school

Sixty people become U.S. citizens in Buffalo ceremony

Sep 17, 2015
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Inside the federal courthouse in downtown Buffalo, 60 people from 28 countries became U.S. citizens in a naturalization ceremony.


WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

American industries and health care fields are constantly looking for engineers and scientists and there probably aren't enough who live here to fill all the openings.

Eileen Buckley, WBFO

A newly-launched community newspaper aims to serve Buffalo's immigrant population by providing news and other information in multiple languages, in an effort to get those who have not yet mastered English more involved in the public.

WBFO file photo

The search is underway for panelists to join a committee being formed by the Erie County Executive to address language and cultural gaps among the region's various immigrant populations, as members of those populations adapt to life as new U.S. citizens or continue their path toward citizenship.

Ark Media / WBFO News

 The history of a people who have influenced our nation for over 100 years is brought to life in the new PBS documentary, The Italian Americans.

Niagara University is observing its Vincentian heritage this week.  Saint Vincent de Paul, a 17th century French priest, was best known for his devotion to helping those most in need.  Wednesday, Niagara staged a panel discussion to explore a timely social topic from a Vincentian perspective by delving into the immigration issue.

Mike Desmond/wbfo news

Catholic Bishop Richard Malone says the U.S. needs a comprehensive solution to the immigration problem. "They're in a perilous situation," Malone said of the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants. "No one says it's an easy thing, but we really do think the government's got to deal with it."

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