Love Canal

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation reports soil samples taken show no contamination from the Niagara Sanitation Landfill in Wheatfield leaking to nearby properties.

Though it may be a worst-case scenario, residents living near a Wheatfield landfill may be unwitting victims of Love Canal. On WBFO's Press Pass, Dan Telvock of Investigative Post discusses the history of the landfill, which at one time contained hazardous material from Love Canal. Now, there are concerns that some of the waste may have migrated onto nearby residential properties.


Heritage Moments: Love Canal and the Niagara Falls 'housewives' who shook the world

Aug 15, 2016
Photo by Penelope D. Ploughman, ©1980, all rights reserved. Courtesy, University Archives, State University of New York at Buffalo

Some 40 years after chemicals were first observed bubbling from the ground at Love Canal, the health risks resulting from the poisoning of the Niagara Falls, N.Y., neighborhood are still making headlines today. Yet we sometimes forget that the Love Canal disaster might have amounted to little more than a footnote, were it not for the relentless defiance of a group of average citizens. Without the efforts of those citizens – most of them housewives -- the modern environmental movement as we know it today might not exist.


Oxford University Press

It has been almost 40 years since Love Canal seeped into the public consciousness and as local residents know, neither the chemicals nor the story have gone away. In his new book, "Love Canal: A Toxic History from Colonial Times to the Present," Richard Newman looks back to the days when the canal was dug.


Dan Telvock/Investigative Post

Toxic waste from Love Canal was removed from a landfill in Wheatfield in 2014 and 2015. But the New York Department of Environmental Conservation recently determined that the Nash Road site poses a "significant threat to public health."

Joseph O'Rourke/WGRZ

State environmental officials insisted for decades that residents living on the North Tonawanda-Wheatfield border had nothing to fear from the Love Canal waste buried in a neighboring landfill. Then, last year, they declared the landfill a Superfund site, even after 80 truckloads of contaminated soil originally removed from Love Canal were hauled away. Residents, many of whom report serious illnesses, are understandably upset. Dan Telvock, with our partner Investigative Post, dug through documents and filed this report.


Former resident Lois Gibbs remembers Love Canal

Oct 23, 2013
Ashley Hirtzel / WBFO News

Niagara Falls residents and activists commemorated the 35th anniversary of the historic Love Canal relocation on Tuesday.

Photo from Google map

A recently filed lawsuit connected to Love Canal has been moved from county court to US District Court.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

One of the world's most notorious toxic dump sites is making headlines once again following a sewer incident. Today, The Buffalo News continues its two-part series on the site. 

File Photo / WBFO/AM 970 News

The Love Canal region of Niagara Falls is once again receiving scrutiny.

Students of the former 93rd Street School have begun to compare notes on a variety of health issues that have arisen amongst them. The school was located in the Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area and was razed in the 1970's.

A community meeting is being scheduled for Tuesday evening at the Evening Star Concert Hall.

Anyone who feels that they have been affected by exposure to chemicals near the school are welcome to attend.