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The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

Balloons, body paint, joy and mourning — across the world Sunday, Muslims gathered to celebrate the end of the holy month of Ramadan, and the festivities took nearly as many shapes as the places they were held.

The Trump administration has appealed an order by a federal judge in Hawaii that indefinitely blocks the president's executive order restricting travel to the U.S. from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.

The state of Hawaii sued to stop the travel ban, arguing the president's policy violates the Constitution. U.S. District Judge Derrick K. Watson extended his nationwide order blocking the executive order while the lawsuit continues. The administration has asked the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to rule against Watson.

Updated at 10:45 p.m.

President Trump blasted a federal judge's decision to temporarily halt his revised travel ban on Wednesday night, telling a campaign rally in Nashville, Tenn., that he wished he had stood his ground and fought for his original, much stricter executive order.

Two lawyers, three judges, thousands of ordinary Americans: On Tuesday night, oral arguments in Washington v. Trump attracted an unusually large audience for audio-only legal proceedings.

The case centers on President Trump's controversial executive order that would temporarily bar all new refugees from entering the U.S., as well as visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

WBFO's Mike Desmond

In a mosque on Buffalo's West Side filled with immigrants - many recent immigrants - there is concern about what President Trump's executive order on immigration will do to them, their dreams and their families.

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The Muslim community in Niagara Falls will soon have a brand new mosque. The $1 million project was approved by the city’s planning board at a meeting this past week.

Mike Desmond/wbfo news

With the presidential campaign heavy on attacks on Muslims and immigrants, local residents rallied in Niagara Square yesterday to defend immigrants and reject those attacks.


Canada has pledged to take in 25,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year. That means in December, hundreds will arrive every day. But since the militant attacks in Paris, some political leaders in the country have voiced concern and, in some regions, there has been a backlash against Muslims.


Mike Desmond/wbfo news

It was 8:58 p.m. Tuesday when the Arabic prayer rang out at sunset and the Iftar dinner celebrating the end of another day of Ramadan commenced in the City Hall lobby.


Arsalan Iftikhar / TheMuslimGuy.com

Human rights lawyer and journalist Arsalan Iftikhar was one of the regular commentators on the popular Barbershop Guys segment of NPR’s Tell Me More. He recently talked with WBFO about the role of Islam in today’s media and in the global community.

Islamic event aims to spark dialogue

Jun 11, 2015

Local residents will have a chance Thursday evening to eat ice cream, shop at the Bazaar, get a Henna tattoo, play some jeopardy and, most importantly, learn and share their thoughts about the Muslim culture.

Mike Desmond/WBFO News

One of the area's smaller Muslim communities, persecuted in some parts of the world, is taking part in a national campaign called Muhammad Messenger of Peace.

Photo provided by WNYMuslims

A new local group is using creative media to explain the religion of Islam and to break down stereotypes of Muslims.

WBFO'S Eileen Buckley recently sat down with Western New York Muslims, an organization that is being led and managed by young Muslim women. 

Mike Desmond/WBFO

Area law enforcers say they don't know much about why the New York Police Department had officers from its intelligence unit prowling locally and on the University at Buffalo campus.

The revelation created paranoia among Muslims at UB and questions among police officers here about what they were looking for and where they went.  A group of local officers appeared Tuesday night at a public meeting sponsored by the Muslim Public Affairs Council of Western New York at the university to talk about civil rights issues.