National/International

NFL owners and players met at league headquarters in New York on Tuesday but failed to resolve the contentious issue of national anthem protests.

Eleven owners and 13 players attended the meeting that lasted for several hours and was variously described as "positive" and "constructive," but didn't break any new ground on the protests that have seen players take a knee, sit or raise fists during pregame renditions of the national anthem to protest against racial inequality and police shootings of unarmed black men.

Updated at 10:25 p.m. ET

Less than a week after President Trump said he is cutting off subsidies to health insurance companies, lawmakers say they have a deal to restore the money and take other actions that could stabilize insurance markets for next year.

China wants nothing to do with America's trash

12 hours ago

America is known for it's large trade deficit with China. But the United States does have a surplus of one particularly smelly export — trash. Erica Phillips of the Wall Street Journal wrote about this unusual trading relationship in her piece "Oh, Scrap: China, the Biggest Buyer of America’s Trash, Wants No More." Erica talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about China's changing attitude towards American scrap.  

Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, says financial markets are almost like rogue artificial intelligence, but it doesn't have to be that way. Then: FCC Chairman Ajit Pai finally says no, you actually can't take away a broadcast license (Mr. President). Finally, "The Lego Ninjago Movie" producer Daniel Lin answers our Make Me Smart question. 

10/17/2017: China's done doing our recycling

17 hours ago

The economics of future technology ... explained with comics

17 hours ago

We're going to take a detour here to the not-too-distant future to see what technologies might shake up the economy and help determine the future of our species. Kelly Weinersmith is a biologist and her husband, Zach, does comics, "Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal" among them. Their new book is called "Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything." It's sort of a layman's explainer mashed up with a comic book.

How much are 50,000 Amazon HQ2 jobs worth?

18 hours ago

10/17/2017: A pretty good earnings season

18 hours ago

What happened to the GOP’s deficit hawks?

18 hours ago

How the GOP tax plan could hurt charities

19 hours ago

Senate budget battle likely as vote looms

20 hours ago

The Senate is expected to take up a budget framework this week. If it passes, the GOP will be one step closer to the tax overhaul it so desperately wants. President Donald Trump promised yesterday in a Rose Garden press conference with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that the tax plan is on track. But the outcome of the pending budget vote is far from predictable.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Can Congress make consumer data safer?

20 hours ago

A move from natural gas to electricity for homes

22 hours ago

10/17/2017: The fight to become Amazon's next home

22 hours ago

The Trump administration has made a number of changes to health policy in the past two weeks, raising questions about how consumers will be affected. Will the new rules for birth control coverage affect access to an intrauterine device? Might an association health plan help bring down costs for workers at small businesses? And if you're healthy, doesn't a short-term health plan that is cheaper than marketplace coverage make sense? Here are some answers to those questions.

Belgian researchers have identified a vulnerability in the way most of us connect wirelessly to the internet. The weakness even has a name: Krack. If exploited (and luckily that has not yet happened, as far as anyone can tell), information like our credit cards, passwords, basically anything we type is at risk for being seen and stolen. For businesses trying to keep their data and yours safe, this opens up a whole new front in the cybersecurity war. 

My Economy: Anxious about medical bills down the road

Oct 16, 2017

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

Today’s installment is from Irwin Kwan, a user experience designer in Massachusetts.

Social Security benefits will rise 2 percent in 2018 for approximately 61 million older Americans who rely on the benefit. The annual cost-of-living adjustment is based on the third-quarter Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. The COLA hasn’t been as high as 2 percent since 2011; it rose 0.3 percent this year and didn't increase at all in 2016. Low inflation in recent years has helped seniors financially, since many are on fixed incomes. But the rate of inflation in the health care sector has exceeded overall consumer price inflation in recent years.

The curious case of the $629 ER bill — and one expensive Band-Aid

Oct 16, 2017

In January 2015, Malcolm Bird took his 1-year-old daughter, Collette, to an emergency room after she started bleeding heavily from a cut on her finger. The doctor cleaned up the cut, put a Band-Aid on it, and sent them home.

A few weeks later, the family received a bill in the mail for $629. The breakdown of the bill was $7 for the Band-Aid, and $622 for what's known as an "emergency room facility fee” — the price a hospital charges for seeking services from an emergency room, no matter what problem a patient is having.

Ira Belgrade had been a Hollywood talent manager for decades when his wife, who was also his business partner, died suddenly from Lyme disease.  

“I fell apart, my business fell apart,” Belgrade said.  “How was I going to tell my 2 1/2-year-old, 'Now we’ve got to move, you can’t have that bedroom anymore'?

10/16/2017: Preventing distracted driving

Oct 16, 2017

(Markets Edition) The Federal Reserve still wants another interest rate hike or two. Julia Coronado, founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives, joined us to discuss why Fed Chair Janet Yellen has been pushing for them. Afterwards, we'll look at the issue of distracted driving, which causes more than 3,000 deaths a year. We now have software that will allow police to scan a driver's phone for activity.

Colin Kaepernick says the NFL colluded against him

Oct 16, 2017

(U.S. Edition) Colin Kaepernick — the football player who began kneeling during the national anthem to protest social injustice — has filed a grievance against the NFL, claiming that the league's teams colluded to keep him from getting a new contract. On today's show, we'll look at what the league's collective bargaining agreement means for his case. Afterwards, we'll discuss Alibaba's plan to double its spending on research and development to $15 billion over the next three years.

Chinese internet giant Alibaba is taking a big step toward competing globally. It plans to more than double spending on research and development to $15 billion over the next three years, and will open labs in seven cities around the world, including in Russia, Singapore and in the U.S. But can its dominance of the Chinese market translate into international success?

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

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