National/International

The role of human resources in workplace harassment

Aug 10, 2018

When there are cases of harassment and bullying in the workplace, it's likely the company's human resources department (or a close equivalent) will eventually get involved. But according to some workplace culture experts, turning to human resources can prove to be potentially dangerous for the employees involved in workplace bullying incidents. There may be retaliation against the employee who brought the complaint about a bullying boss or manager to HR in the first place.

Court orders EPA to ban pesticide

Aug 10, 2018

It's called chlorpyrifos. It's a widespread and controversial insecticide — and now it's been banned. On Thursday, a federal court ordered the EPA to end the use of the chemical, which has been linked to developmental disabilities in children. DowDuPont Inc. is the largest producer of chlorpyrifos, which is used on crops like soybeans, apples and oranges. 

Click on the audio player above to hear more. 

Detailing the origins of the celebrity auction

Aug 10, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The plummeting value of the Turkish lira has now gotten the attention of the European Central Bank, which is keeping an eye on how the crisis could be affecting other foreign banks. Also, a federal court has banned an insecticide that has been linked to developmental disabilities in children — the latest development in the insecticide's contentious history. And, if you're in the market for any odd items that have been graced with the presence of a celebrity, Graceland in Memphis is holding an auction that includes things like a jacket from Elvis.

A key initiative of the Affordable Care Act was a program designed to help control soaring Medicare costs by encouraging doctors and hospitals to work together to coordinate patients' care. This led to the formation of what are known as accountable care organizations or ACOs.

The program was expected to save the government nearly $5 billion by 2019, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

It hasn't come anywhere close.

To finish out our series on venture capital, we'll take a look to the future. Cryptocurrency may have its disruptive eye cast toward venture capital. The initial coin offering is a type of crypto-crowdfunding that startups can use to raise cash quickly without kissing the Silicon Valley ring. But do ICOs really have the potential to replace venture capital for startups? We go back to the time Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Yuliya Chernova, who covers venture capital for the Wall Street Journal, about the pros and cons of ICOs. 

When we started thinking about big cooking projects for our Project Cooking episode, one of the first people that came to mind was Rodney Scott, the pitmaster and owner of Rodney Scott's Barbecue in Charleston, South Carolina. Scott's specialty is whole hog barbecue.

It’s funny to think that many of the things we take for granted are relatively new concepts, like having your own oven in your own kitchen. In some societies, even today, whole villages might share a single oven that someone fires up, and everyone brings their bread to bake or their stews to braise. The idea of community ovens has also taken hold in towns across America. Artist and school librarian Jennifer Burton wanted to see what having a communal oven might do for her town of Johnson, Vermont. So, last year she helped build one in a public square.

Above: Chef Justin Smillie with Francis Lam and a dish of freshly
made summer tomato panade at Upland restaurant in New York City.

America's Test Kitchen makes it easy to cook paella on the grill

Aug 10, 2018

Above: Lan Lam takes notes during one of her recipe tests for paella on the grill.

Has "the film business passed away" with its "most popular" Oscars category?

Aug 9, 2018

The ratings for the Oscars awards ceremony, as a television event, have been dropping steadily for years, with last years' program on ABC the least watched in history. So the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences announced some changes, including a new category: most popular film. This has a lot of people confused — what makes a movie "popular"?

How savvy investments help members of Congress

Aug 9, 2018

U.S. Rep. Chris Collins of New York was arrested and charged this week with allegedly passing on information he learned as a board member of a Australian pharmaceutical company to family members who quickly sold their stock to avoid big losses.

Collins, like about of half of his colleagues in Congress, owns stock in publicly traded companies.

Why mergers are as complicated as relationships

Aug 9, 2018

Today we learned that the merger of Sinclair Broadcast Group and Tribune Media Co. has been called off. Albertsons and Rite Aid also announced their merger will not happen.

That’s two big breakups on one day, but in the grand scheme of things, merger failures aren’t that rare. It happens about 20 percent of the time, according to David King, an associate professor at Florida State University, who has studied merger success and failure.

Vice President Pence described the White House's plans for a Space Force, a sixth branch of the U.S. military that would be responsible for operations in outer space, in a speech on Thursday.

The White House says that the Space Force will be created by 2020. The change, which would require approval from Congress, would be a dramatic change in the organization of the Defense Department.

"We must have American dominance in space, and so we will," Pence said in his speech at the Pentagon.

Day laborers are pressed by Trump immigration policies

Aug 9, 2018

In Woodburn, Oregon, a small city in the Willamette Valley, there’s a Fiesta Mexicana every summer where families gather at a local park for Latin music and dancing, Mexican food and carnival rides. A busy freight rail line runs through the center of town, past small shops catering to the Latino community. On the outskirts, fields of corn, vegetables and grass seed spread in every direction. 

"Undocumented" is a picture book that's not just for kids

Aug 9, 2018

There are millions of undocumented workers in the United States. That part of the workforce is economically significant but not often heard from. Author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh, a dual Mexican and American citizen who grew up on both sides of the border, is trying to tell the story of some of those people in a picture book.

Half of (corporate) marriages don't work out

Aug 9, 2018

There are no trade stories in today's podcast (you're welcome). Instead, we're talking about mergers and acquisitions. This summer has seen several high-profile deals go through and others fall apart. That's not unusual. In fact, one out of five announced mergers don't end up happening at all, and only half are successful. Why do they fall apart? Mostly because of people. Then, in light of the insider trading charges against Rep. Chris Collins, we'll look at congressional investing do's and don'ts.

Sadia Kahn ended up at UC Berkeley because of a look her dad gave her. When she was in middle school she told him she wanted to go to Berkeley because she’d noticed adults perked up when they heard the word, but in this case it backfired.

“He had the saddest look in his eye,” Kahn recalls. “I think he felt guilty. He knew that was something we couldn’t afford.”

Attending a university in California can be a financial burden beyond the means of many college hopefuls. Rising tuition is compounded by the lack of affordable housing in the state and the high cost of living.

Pence outlines plan for new Space Force by 2020

Aug 9, 2018

Faced with growing competition and threats from Russia and China, the White House on Thursday said it will create the U.S. Space Force as a sixth, separate military service by 2020.

Vice President Mike Pence told a Pentagon audience that the plan fulfills President Donald Trump’s vow to ensure America’s dominance in space — a domain that was once peaceful and uncontested that has now become crowded and adversarial.

The New York City Council has banned new permits for Uber and Lyft-style cars in New York City for a year. It’s the first city to do this at a time when these Silicon Valley disruptors are seen to be disrupting traffic and disrupting the lives of traditional yellow taxi and limo drivers.

The city council has also cleared the way to require Lyft and Uber to top up drivers’ salaries if they don’t meet the minimum wage.

(Markets Edition) The government says there was no inflation from June to July. But what does that mean, given how inflation impacts our daily decisions? Also, many businesses are joining forces to support the U.S. Postal Service — they may not be the Avengers, but they do have a name: the Package Coalition.

The U.S. Postal Service gives an update on its finances on Thursday morning. For years, pension costs and decreasing mail volume have caused the postal service to lose money. Now, many businesses are banding together to support the service, forming a lobbying group called the Package Coalition. It includes Amazon and other major e-commerce sellers. They are concerned that calls to reform the USPS could mean price hikes and service cuts. 

Click on the audio player above to hear more. 

(U.S. Edition) The U.S and Japan meet to talk trade for the first time since the U.S. pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. We’re also keeping an eye on the rising inflation in Turkey as the Lira continues to drop. Also, New York City has stopped Uber and Lyft in its tracks there, halting permits for a year due to concerns about traffic. Today's show is sponsored by Avast (avast.com) and Indeed (Indeed.com/marketplace). (08/09/2018)

U.S.-Japan trade talks open today in Washington

Aug 9, 2018

Japan trade talks are set to open today in Washington, D.C. for the first bilateral trade meeting since President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership last year. It’s a high level meeting between Japanese Economic Minister Toshimitsu Motegi and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Negotiating a free trade agreement and tariffs on Japanese auto exports are expected to top the agenda.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

How to protect yourself from a bad boss

Aug 9, 2018

Even in 2018, there are a lot of people that don't get the fact that bullying is not OK. And when the person doing the bullying is your boss, it can suck the joy out of work, or worse, interfere with your home life, relationships and health. 

The next thing you know, that boss isn’t just dictating work — they’re ruining your life.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Fresh controversy around the ongoing European migrant crisis deepens after hundreds of farm workers in Italy go on strike. Then, Swedish meatballs and D-I-Y furniture have landed in India after IKEA opened its first store there today. We’ll hear from the company’s boss about its plans for future investment in the country.

This week we’re diving into stories about venture capital. There’s a group of venture capital firms that want to change the world for the better and make money. This is called impact investing. One of the firms working in this space is Impact America Fund, which invests in companies with diverse missions — for instance, a startup that helps African-American stylists sell their own hair extensions. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talked with Impact America Fund founder Kesha Cash about the sometimes complex collision of money and mission in venture capital.

As the trade war rages on, one industry is stuck in the middle of it all: shipping. Up and down the Mississippi River you’ll see lots of farm goods that have been slapped with tariffs. And down in Mississippi tariffs aren't just in the headlines, they’re on a lot of people's minds since so much local business is connected to agriculture and trading on the river. To give us an update, Kai Ryssdal called up Austin Golding, president of Golding Barge, for some insight on how business has changed with the tariffs. The following is an edited transcript.

All tariff pain is local

Aug 8, 2018

Another $16 billion of tariffs on imports from China will take effect in a couple weeks — Aug. 23 to be precise. That announcement came from office of the U.S. Trade Representative yesterday. Semiconductors and various plastics are on the list. The reaction from China was swift and predictable in this tit-for-tat thing we've got going on. China promptly said I see you and I match you — $16 billion in tariffs on U.S. products. So far, the macro effect of these tariffs on, say, GDP, prices or jobs has been minimal.

The United States will impose sanctions on Russia for its use of a nerve agent in an attempt to kill a former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain.

The State Department says Wednesday the sanctions will be imposed on Russia because it used a chemical weapon in violation of international law.

Former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter were poisoned by Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent, in the British town of Salisbury in March.

Britain has accused Russia of being behind the attack, which the Kremlin vehemently denies.

If you have a Chase credit card — and there are tens of millions of you out there — you may have received an email asking you to “sign into Chase Credit Journey now to review your credit score and a complete history of your recent alerts.” That’s right, Chase wants you to “journey” through your credit history. For free. And Chase isn’t the only one.

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