National/International

Coin-operated gumball machines aren't as common as they used to be. With sales slowly dwindling over the years and high domestic sugar prices, America's sole remaining gumball maker has been branching out to stay afloat.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Markets Edition) New numbers show the benefits of aggressively helping young people finish school and find jobs. A study followed two groups, both ages 16 to 24, on their journeys. Then we dive into the markets, where the latter half of this week signals the beginning of a new season of sorts for market participants. Also, we check in on the last American gumball company standing, Ford Gum and Machine Company, which has been around for more than a century.

Updated 4:55 p.m. ET

Nikki Haley is resigning as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and will leave the Trump administration at the end of the year, she said Tuesday.

It is not immediately clear what prompted the move. She informed her staff Tuesday, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

Haley appeared with President Trump on Tuesday morning at the Oval Office, where he called her a "fantastic person" and said Haley had told him six months ago that she might take time off at the end of the year.

A Wall Street Journal report finds that the private information of nearly half a million Google users was vulnerable from 2015 to March 2018.

Ask a Manager: Should we talk politics at work?

Oct 9, 2018

Watercooler chit chat isn’t always captivating: Martha’s got a new cat, traffic really was terrible today and Garrett wants to explain the difference between bouldering and top roping, again. But conversations at the watercooler don’t always stay cool. Talking politics at work can heat things up very fast. With the midterms less than a month out, it might seem impossible to avoid.

(U.S. Edition) A new report details how the private information of almost half a million Google users was exposed to hackers until Google sealed up the leak in the spring. The apparent weak link was Google Plus, so we take a look at the data vulnerabilities that can occur when a platform fades into oblivion. Then, we check the global economic pulse with new data from the International Monetary Fund.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The IMF has downgraded its view of global growth due in part to ongoing trade tensions. We’ll hear from the organization’s chief economist. Then, after a month of speculation, Pakistan put rumors to rest and said it will seek a bailout from the International Monetary Fund to tackle its mounting balance of payments crisis. We’ll hear from our reporter on the ground in Islamabad.  Afterwards, Korean pop band BTS has stepped in to fill the boy-band vacuum, igniting a wave of excitement around the globe with its “Love Yourself” world tour.

A report last week from Bloomberg Businessweek suggested that Chinese spies had embedded tiny microchips on motherboards that control computers in order to steal information from nearly 30 U.S. companies, including Apple and Amazon. Both of those companies, and Super Micro, the electronics maker that was allegedly infiltrated, and the Chinese government have categorically denied the report. But the story is lingering, in part because it brings up a very scary reality that lots of cybersecurity experts keep talking about. Molly Wood talks about it with cybersecurity expert Bruce Schneier.

A report last week from Bloomberg Businessweek suggested that Chinese spies had embedded tiny little microchips on motherboards that control computers in order to steal information from nearly 30 U.S. companies, including Apple and Amazon. Both of those companies, and Super Micro Computer Inc., the electronics maker that was allegedly infiltrated have categorically denied the report.

The stretch limousine involved in a deadly crash in upstate New York on Saturday had recently failed a state safety inspection and its driver did not have the proper license to drive the vehicle, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday.

The crash killed all 18 occupants of the modified limo and two pedestrians. Federal officials said it is the deadliest transportation accident in the U.S. since a 2009 plane crash.

Updated at 9:20 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court welcomes its newest justice Tuesday as Brett Kavanaugh takes the bench for his first arguments since a contentious Senate voted narrowly to confirm him, cementing a decades-long campaign by conservatives to reshape the nation's highest court.

The U.S. Census Bureau says it needs to hire hundreds of thousands of workers to complete the 2020 census. But since the economy is in such good shape, with unemployment down to 3.7 percent in September, that hiring task may be a lot harder than it was back in 2010. And the census faces more competition in the gig economy from other part-time jobs, like ride-sharing services, that may be offer more appealing opportunities.

How Nobel Prize winner Paul Romer redefined economics

Oct 8, 2018

Paul Romer of New York University's Stern School of Business won the Nobel Prize for economics Monday for his work connecting technological innovation to economic growth. He shared the prize with William Nordhaus of Yale, who researches the economic impact of climate change.

Romer's big breakthrough was this: He took models of economic growth and added a missing, magic ingredient.

There's a new report out on climate change science and it's bleak. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, made up of thousands of scientists, finds the earth's temperature has risen 1 degree Celsius — or 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit — since pre-industrial times. And if we don't keep warming under 2 degrees? Well, the oceans could rise an extra four inches, "virtually all" coral reefs could be lost, and grain yields and water available would plummet. We can see this in dollar terms, as in $8 trillion to $15 trillion in costs, according to the report.

To be an oil person in Kansas is to understand that bad times follow good and that betting on any dip or upswing is a game for suckers.

Yet it can be so tempting when crude prices soar. There’s so much money to be made. Or, of course, lost.

The far-flung, mostly small and independent oil and gas companies in the state found themselves laid flat by the bust of 2014. It still stings.

Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in economics. Who are they?

Oct 8, 2018

The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to Yale's William Nordhaus and New York University's Paul Romer on Monday morning. Nordhaus developed a way to think about the benefits and costs of mitigating climate change. Romer is also familiar to Marketplace listeners: He figured out a way to factor in technology in economic growth calculations. To help tell us more about the winners, Marketplace Morning Report's David Brancaccio talked to economics contributor Chris Farrell. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

It was lunch time in Manhattan and Anastasia Tzdanides had just made a makeup run to Sephora. She picked up “some Hourglass products; a brush, blush, bronzer,” she said.

At 23, Tzdanides is a typical young cosmetics buyer. She buys lots of different brands after she's researched them online. Her mother, Johanna, who was shopping with her, said her generation did things differently. 

“We stuck with one brand; you used Clarins or you used Lancome. Where here you try the different ones and you kind of mix everything,” she said.

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

(Markets Edition) Has the world gotten complacent about the price of oil? According to the Wall Street Journal, bets on oil surpassing $100 per barrel have doubled in the last month. Julia Coronado at Macropolicy Perspectives has more. Then, we examine the growing trade deficit as seen through goods and services … specifically services. Also, across two hemispheres, officials are cutting back on how much financial cushion banks set aside for emergencies.

Here’s an unusual tale of urban revival in the U.K., which owes much to an iconic entertainer from the U.S. The small Welsh seaside resort of Porthcawl — population 10,000 — had been waning for years. Holidaymakers had been choosing sunnier vacations overseas and the town, with its rather antiquated fairground and slightly tacky amusement arcades, was sliding into seedy decline.

But now the town is undergoing an economic renaissance.

And it’s largely thanks to the King of Rock n' Roll.

Dairy was one of the sticking points between the United States and Canada during the negotiations to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement.

American producers of milk and cheese complained Canada's tightly controlled dairy industry limited their access to markets north of the border. The new agreement opens the door to more U.S. milk exports to Canada.

While it could lead to lower prices there, many Canadians worry about the fate of small milk and cheese producers, particularly in Quebec, home to half of Canadian dairy production. 

(U.S. Edition) Scientists with the International Panel on Climate Change have gathered in South Korea and released a report Monday outlining the steps that need to be taken to stop global temperatures from rising by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. It also says that We also examine how goods and services indicate a growing trade deficit, but services alone offer different insights.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service …  A new report on climate change says 2.5 percent of global GDP needs to be spent each year for two decades to stop global warming. We hear from the co-chair of the International Panel on Climate Change. Then, Brazil’s voters handed a previously fringe candidate nearly half the vote in Sunday’s election, but he’ll face a runoff election  at the end of the month after failing to secure a majority. What does that mean for a country facing continued economic hardship?

Almost 40 percent of rural America, or about 23 million people, don't have access to broadband internet or reliable mobile service. Long term, this digital divide is a huge economic problem. Companies need high-skilled workers, and people without decent internet access can't find those jobs or get the training they might need to do them. Now the Fed is trying convince businesses that the digital divide is their problem, too, Jeremy Hegle told us. He's a senior community development adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

Almost 40 percent of rural America, or about 23 million people, don't have access to broadband internet or reliable mobile service. Long term, this digital divide is a huge economic problem. Companies need high-skilled workers, and people without decent internet access can't find those jobs or get the training they might need to do them. Now the Fed is trying convince businesses that the digital divide is their problem, too, Jeremy Hegle told us. He's a senior community development adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

Updated at 12:28 a.m. ET Monday

To celebrate her upcoming 30th birthday, Amy Steenburg and more than a dozen close friends and relatives packed into a stretch limousine for an afternoon of wine- and beer-tasting around upstate New York.

When we report on the world's thirst for energy, we often miss something: chemicals made from oil and gas. A new report today finds petrochemical demand in the world is surging for things like synthetic rubber, packaging, fertilizer and detergents. In the long run, chemicals may be a bigger driver of world oil demand than even driving.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

What it's like to hold multiple jobs

Oct 5, 2018

One of the statistics included in the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statics (Friday’s report showed the lowest unemployment rate since December 1969) concerns the percentage of the workforce that holds down more than one job.

In September, that figure was 4.9 percent. And that number has stayed fairly steady over the last decade or so, even as the actual unemployment rate has been falling. 

How do you sleep at night?

Oct 5, 2018

Unemployment is at a 40-year low and wages are starting to tick up, but the number of people working multiple jobs hasn’t changed in more than a decade. Why? Then: Mattress Firm has filed for bankruptcy, citing poor sales. The sleep business has changed a lot in recent years, in part because starting your own online bed-in-a-box company is really, really easy. Plus, as always, we'll review the economic news of the seven days gone by on the Weekly Wrap.

Here's an explanation about why there's a backlog of immigration cases

Oct 5, 2018

The recent wave of migrants crossing the US-Mexico border tests any already overwhelmed US judicial system.

Pages