National/International

The Issues At Stake In The Montana Primary

Jun 6, 2016

A number of states head to the polls tomorrow in the last “Super Tuesday” of the primary season. Among them is Montana, where issues that matter to voters are much different than those of East Coast voters.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Eric Whitney of Montana Public Radio about the state’s primary.

Guest

Voters in Switzerland over the weekend rejected the idea of providing a proposal to give all citizens a basic income of about $2,500, regardless of employment. However, the idea continues to gain traction elsewhere – Finland is starting a pilot program that provides 10,000 adults a basic income, and in Oakland a tech company is also testing out the idea.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about what research says about how a basic income could work.

Guest

Updated 3:15 a.m. ET

David Gilkey, an NPR photojournalist who chronicled pain and beauty in war and conflict, was killed in Afghanistan on Sunday along with NPR's Afghan interpreter Zabihullah Tamanna.

You've heard that you should eat more kale. Now a small but growing industry wants you to eat more kelp.

Seaweed production has long been a big industry in Asia. But recently, American entrepreneurs have launched new enterprises that grow fresh and frozen seaweed right here in the States.

Onaje X.O. Woodbine grew up in inner city Boston and was on the path to his own NBA dreams — as a sophomore at Yale he was the team's highest scorer. He was voted one of the top Ivy League players, but in a move that provoked the ire of his coach, he quit — to devote more time to his studies. He wanted to become, as he wrote in a letter to his coach, "the person I was meant to be."

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Kale is cool. For foodies, anyway. It's everywhere these days — in salads, smoothies, chips and even ice cream. Someone decided to create National Kale Day — it's Oct. 3 this year.

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Narendra Modi Comes To Washington

Jun 5, 2016

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Ethiopian Runners Say They Face Discrimination

Jun 5, 2016

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Boxers Remember Muhammad Ali

Jun 4, 2016

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Copa Soccer Tournament Begins In U.S.

Jun 4, 2016

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C.W. Stoneking Is Blues From Down Under

Jun 4, 2016

C.W. Stoneking is from the Northern Territory of Australia, but his sound is old school southern American blues. We catch him on his first U.S. tour and talk about his new album, Gon' Boogaloo.

Click the audio link above to hear the full conversation. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Muhammad Ali's Louisville Roots

Jun 4, 2016

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Update at 3:15 p.m. ET: Ali's Funeral Set For Friday

Muhammad Ali, the man considered the greatest boxer of all time, died late Friday at a hospital in Phoenix at age 74. He was battling respiratory problems.

He died of septic shock related to natural causes, with his family at his bedside, according to family spokesman Bob Gunnell.

Ali inspired millions by standing up for his principles during the volatile 1960s and by always entertaining — in the boxing ring and in front of a microphone.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is making sweeping reforms to the nation's flood insurance program in the wake of a series of critical reports on NPR and the PBS series Frontline. But lawmakers say this isn't enough when private insurance companies are profiting millions of dollars from a program that is already $23 billion in debt.

Tucked amid the tumult of Lower Manhattan's Financial District, right across from a factory-outlet shoe store promising "probably" the lowest prices in the city, you'll find Alexander Hamilton's grave. With the explosive popularity of the Broadway musical Hamilton, that grave is seeing a surge of new fans coming to pay respects to the Founding Father.

Lillian Hasko has seen the musical twice, bought the soundtrack, and felt compelled to make the pilgrimage downtown.

Jobs Growth Slows Dramatically In May

Jun 3, 2016

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Texas lawmakers have asked state health officials to come up with “a clear and concise plan” for dealing with a possible Zika outbreak.

But experts warn there are some underlying health care access issues in Texas that could make dealing with Zika difficult. Ashley Lopez from Here & Now contributor KUT in Austin reports.

Reporter

Wall Street fell today upon news of the smallest monthly addition of jobs in almost six years.

The U.S. added just 38,000 jobs in May, a shockingly low number to some economists that stirred fears of an economic slowdown, and could influence monetary policy at the Federal Reserve.

Marilyn Geewax, NPR senior business editor, joins Here & Now’s Robin Young for a closer look at the lackluster jobs numbers and what they mean for the U.S. economy.

Guest

It’s been a year since Gloucester, Massachusetts Police Chief Leonard Campanello announced that his officers would help people get into addiction treatment, rather than arrest them.

More than 400 people have gone to the police station for help, more than 100 police departments around the country have started similar programs and Campanello was recognized at the White House.

Deborah Becker from Here & Now contributor WBUR has this look back at the first year of the so-called “Angel program.”

Summer TV is back, and the big networks, cable networks and streaming services have lots of fresh fare. There’s a new show from the creators of “The Walking Dead.” Simon Cowell returns to “America’s Got Talent.”

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans.

Guest

Composer and author Paul Bowles first went to Morocco in 1931. He fell in love with the country, returning often and eventually moving to Tangier, where he lived from 1947 until his death in 1999. Among the things Bowles valued most about Morocco was its varieties of music.

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to a group of 65-year-old voters as part of a radio series where he explores the generational differences between how 25, 45 and 65-year-olds think about politics. He finds that this group of 65-year-olds were born into a structured world, which, for many, resembled The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. But later, their outlook was rocked by a series of assassinations of political figures, anti-war and civil rights protests. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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