National/International

What One District's Data Mining Did For Chronic Absence

May 30, 2016

Mel Atkins has spent most of his life with Grand Rapids Public Schools in Michigan. He graduated from Ottawa Hills High, where he played baseball. But his real love was bowling. He says he's bowled 22 perfect games.

He's been a teacher and principal in the city's public schools. And now he works for the district, overseeing just about everything related to students.

One more thing you need to know about him: Mel Atkins is a number-cruncher.

Three years ago, the superintendent came to him with a question: Does Grand Rapids have an issue with chronic absenteeism?

'Top Gear' Returns With New Hosts On BBC America

May 30, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Bernie Sanders meets with voters in California today, as that state and five other states prepare to vote next week.

Bill and Hillary Clinton marched in the Memorial Day parade in Chappaqua, New York where they live. The investigation of Hillary Clinton’s emails dominated conversation on the Sunday morning talk shows.

Donald Trump continued to draw crowds, and consternation, from some Republicans. Yesterday he told people gathered on the National Mall that “illegals are taken care of better than our veterans.”

In the 1930s, a Japanese-American teacher in Hawaii came up with an ambitious plan: take kids who had just learned to swim in a re-purposed sugar cane ditch and train them to compete on an international level.

Julie Checkoway tells the story in “The Three Year Swim Club: The Untold Story of Maui’s Sugar Ditch Kids and Their Quest for Olympic Glory.” Here & Now revisits Meghna Chakrabarti’s conversation with the author from last October.

The Future Of Driverless Cars Is Now

May 30, 2016

Just about 34 million people hit the road over the Memorial Day weekend—the most since 2005 and the second-highest total on record. But in the not too distant future we all may be flying to our holiday destinations—in our cars.

The country’s oldest urban national park, Rock Creek Park, spans 1,800 acres in the middle of Washington, D.C. The park not only includes hiking trails but also has historic buildings, a golf course, amphitheater and planetarium. Anthony Linforth, a ranger at Rock Creek Park, tells Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti what makes the park special.

Guest

At the end of 2013, snowy owls started invading the United States in a way scientists had never seen. The influx came due to a huge uptick in lemmings, an owl delicacy, and provided scientists the chance to track and record swaths of new data on the animal.

NPR’s Adam Cole has studied one snowy owl, known as Baltimore, and followed the route the bird took when it migrated back north.

Libertarian Party Nominates Former Gov. Gary Johnson

May 30, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

The City of Thornton is one of many growing suburbs of Denver, Colo. On a day without much traffic, it's only a 20-minute commute into the state capitol, and its new homes with big yards make it an attractive bedroom community. Nearly 130,000 people live there, and the population is expected to keep booming.

Millenials Are Moving Back With Mom And Dad

May 28, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

It has been nearly a month now since National Poetry Month wrapped up, but don't let the calendar fool you: All Things Considered still has some unfinished business with the month that was.

That's because, just a few weeks ago, NPR's Michel Martin checked in with the Words Unlocked poetry contest. The competition — launched in 2013 by the Center for Educational Excellence in Alternative Settings — drew more than 1,000 poem submissions from students in juvenile correctional facilities across the country.

Barbershop: The Benefits Of Living At Home

May 28, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

'The Cosby Show's' legacy in South Africa

May 28, 2016

Bill Cosby's fall from grace has been steep. For decades he was not only an American icon but a global one.

His groundbreaking sitcom "The Cosby Show" was a hit around the world, including in South Africa. In fact in the mid-1980s, during the height of repression under apartheid, "The Cosby Show" was the most popular TV program among white South Africans. Black South Africans watched it too. 

North Korea Linked To Cyber Attacks On Asian Banks

May 27, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Top Alabama Lawmakers Embroiled In Political Scandal

May 27, 2016

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By the time his first memoir, Fresh Off The Boat, came out in 2013, Eddie Huang was really hitting his stride. His New York restaurant, Baohaus — which serves gua bao, or Taiwanese hamburgers — was doing really well. His TV show, Huang's World, was taking him all over the world.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Military Veterans Take On Zombies In 'Range 15'

May 27, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

If your child is taking medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), their doctor may soon offer a new option: fruit-flavored chewables.

The new drug, Adzenys XR-ODT, got FDA approval in January, and went on the market last week. But some psychiatrists are concerned that making amphetamines in a candy-like form will make people more likely to abuse them, and also contribute to what some see as a trend of overmedicating children.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks with Meghana Keshavan, biotech correspondent at STAT.

This week in campaign news, Donald Trump became the presumed Republican Party presidential nominee, after clinching the support of unbound delegates in North Dakota.

Democrat Hillary Clinton rejected the idea of having another debate with primary rival Bernie Sanders, but Sanders and Trump both said they’d like to debate each other. And a State Department audit came out that was critical of Clinton’s personal email use when she was Secretary of State.

The 1990s are back.

For months Donald Trump has been saying that he planned to attack Hillary Clinton for the sex scandals that embroiled her husband's presidency in the '90s. He has said she "enabled" her husband's infidelities and "hurt" the women who were his accusers, although he hasn't offered any evidence of how she did that.

President Barack Obama visited Hiroshima today, the first American president to do so. Several months after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki an American military film crew shot color footage of the devastated cities.

The film was classified top secret and critics say it was suppressed for decades because it so graphically documented the horror of nuclear war.

Reporter Jon Kalish reports for Here & Now about the man who directed the filming, and the impact it had on him and his family.

More Photos Of Herbert SussanGuest

A drug-resistant strain of E.coli bacteria has been found for the first time in the United States.

The bacteria was discovered when a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman showed up at a local clinic seeking treatment for a urinary tract infection. Samples of the bacteria were sent to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for testing, where it was confirmed that the E. coli carried a resistance gene known as Mcr-1.

New York Considers A Ban On Declawing Cats

May 27, 2016

For years, some pet owners have routinely had their cats declawed to keep them from scratching furniture or people. But the State of New York is considering a bill that would ban the procedure.

Opponents of declawing point out that it is not a simple cosmetic procedure, but a surgery that amputates a segment of bone, ligaments and nerves in the paw.

New York State Assembly member Linda Rosenthal sponsored the legislation, and tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young it’s time to outlaw the procedure.

Guest

An intentional attack on a police officer can now be prosecuted as a hate crime in Louisiana. Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards signed the so-called “blue lives matter” bill into law on Thursday. It makes Louisiana the first state in the nation to include police and other emergency responders under its hate crime laws, which usually protect people based on race, gender or religion.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Associated Press reporter Megan Trimble about the law.

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