National/International

On Wednesday, the Trump administration unveiled a proposal for even higher tariffs on many consumer goods imported from China. We went to a shopping center in Austin, Texas, to find out what buyers of those goods thought about the plan.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency was ordered to once again extend a housing program for survivors of Hurricanes Maria and Irma, whose homes in Puerto Rico were destroyed and are now living in U.S. and Puerto Rico hotels.

The financial crisis that never fully goes away

Aug 2, 2018

(U.S. Edition) Wells Fargo has agreed to a $2 billion fine a decade after the financial crisis. We'll look at the details of the company's settlement with the Justice Department and how it compares with other settlements from the recession. Afterwards, we'll hear from customers at a Walmart in Texas to find out what they think of the Trump administration's tariff plans, and then we'll talk to reporter Paul Tullis about the vulnerabilities that exist with GPS.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Google has been non-operational in China for the last eight years thanks to worries about government censorship. But the tide could be about to turn. Then, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney has been dubbed the “unreliable boyfriend” as Britain’s central bank has been weary to raise interest rates over the last few months. Today, though, investors are near certain a quarter percentage point rate rise will be delivered. But with Brexit looming and slow wage growth, is now – realistically – a good time?

This weekend in Las Vegas, the huge cybersecurity event Black Hat USA kicks off, followed immediately by the other big cybersecurity event of the year, Def Con. There are always some big hacker stunts at these events — hackers already broke into a voting machine as a Def Con demonstration. But after a year of major data breaches, there's also a sense of security fatigue. Chester Wisniewski is a principal research scientist at Sophos, a security firm.

This weekend in Las Vegas, the huge cybersecurity event Black Hat USA kicks off, followed immediately by the other big cybersecurity event of the year, Def Con.  There are always some big hacker stunts at these events — hackers already broke into a voting machine as a Def Con demonstration. But after a year of major data breaches, there's also a sense of security fatigue. Chester Wisniewski is a principal research scientist at Sophos, a security firm. He talked with Marketplace’s Molly Wood about whether that fatigue is affecting business. (08/02/2018)

If you're the kind of sports fan who likes to put a little money on games, there was some news for you this week. The National Basketball Association has become the first major sports league in this country to sign a deal with a sports betting operation. Back in May the Supreme Court said it was okay for states to legalize sports betting, meaning Las Vegas would no longer have a monopoly. ESPN reports the deal the NBA signed with MGM Resorts is worth $25 million over three years.

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The Trump administration finalized rules today that expand access to so-called "skinny” short-term health insurance plans. Those are low-cost, low-coverage insurance plans meant for people who have a temporary gap in health insurance.

Under the Obama administration, insurers could offer you a short-term plan for up to three months. Now, President Donald Trump has extended that timeline, so insurers can offer short-term insurance plans for up to three years.

Why buy a short-term plan?

Postcard from a Japanese steel town

Aug 1, 2018

Kamaishi, Japan, may be a long way from Pittsburgh, but the two cities have a lot in common.

Once upon a time, both were thriving hubs for steel production. Then globalization happened. Companies had to figure out how to compete and survive in the world marketplace, and the old ways of doing things didn’t quite work anymore.

You’ve probably heard of MoviePass, the subscription-based movie ticket service — yeah, the one having a lot of problems recently. Sinemia offers a similar ticket plan through their mobile app, but with a different business model. It's not a household name yet in North America, but Sinemia's expanded to Canada, Australia, the U.K. and now the U.S. Founder and CEO Rifat Oguz moved the company to Los Angeles last year, and he told us how he plans to make the movie subscription business work.

The brave new world of legalized sports gambling

Aug 1, 2018

The NBA has become the first major sports league in this country to sign a deal with a sports betting operation. Back in May, the Supreme Court said it was OK for states to legalize sports betting, meaning Las Vegas would no longer have a monopoly. ESPN reports the deal the NBA signed with MGM Resorts is worth $25 million over three years. We'll talk about how that might play out. Then: A MoviePass competitor is expanding to the United States just as the company is struggling. Can Sinemia make the business model work? We asked its CEO.

Another movie ticket subscription business tries to make it in Hollywood

Aug 1, 2018

While MoviePass is in the headlines for its struggles with pricing and stockholders, a similar movie ticket subscription has been operating quietly around the globe. Sinemia is the MoviePass competitor founded in Turkey a few years ago. It isn’t quite a household name yet, but its expanded to Canada, Australia, the U.K. and now the U.S.

The big U.S. and foreign automakers release their July sales numbers Wednesday. Car and light-truck sales have been strong so far this year — with consumer confidence up, the job market good, and people banking a little more income from the recent tax cuts. How does the rest of the year look for automakers?

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The economics of housing the homeless is a tricky equation, especially in New York City, which has a right-to-shelter mandate, meaning the city has to provide a temporary bed to anyone who needs it. Because of demand, the city often houses people in apartments and hotels where accommodations can be spotty and social services nonexistent.

(Markets Edition) Interest rates are going up — not at the hands of the Fed, but market forces. We'll look at how a new report on hiring in the private sector is fueling this. Afterwards, we'll discuss the state of the auto industry and the risks it faces in the near future, and then we'll explore how one New York City nonprofit is changing up the homeless shelter model by becoming its own landlord.

Revenue from services drives Apple earnings

Aug 1, 2018

Apple delivered its best-ever revenue for the third quarter on Tuesday after the bell. The usual suspects, iPhones and iPads, performed well. But a lot of the growth came from the company’s services, like iCloud, ApplePay and Apple music. But continued growth could face some headwinds in the next quarter because of possible U.S. tariffs on consumer goods from China.

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A chef learns from the financial crisis

Aug 1, 2018

(U.S. Edition) Apple has revealed it earned more than $11.5 billion in profits with help from the usual suspects like iPhones and iPads. But while those products performed well, a lot of the growth actually came elsewhere. We'll look at what the next frontier is for Apple. Afterwards, we'll talk to chef Peter Hoffman, who opened several restaurants in New York City beginning in the '90s, about how he saw the 2008 financial crisis play out in his business.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Apple is getting ever closer to becoming the first trillion-dollar company as investors cheered second-quarter earnings released yesterday. But with the company’s share price pacing higher, we’ll explain one race in which the tech titan has lost ground. Then, for centuries, diamonds have been seen as precious objects of desire, and near necessities for couples about to be married.

Free food is a legendary perk of working at a tech company. The cafeterias at Apple, Google, and Facebook are almost like a tourist attraction. But cities in the San Francisco Bay Area are saying that the free lunches are killing local business, and they're moving to ban company cafeterias.

In fall of 2008, I was working in a restaurant in lower Manhattan while trying to learn how to be a radio producer. The restaurant was called Savoy, and it was a nice, comfortable place – lots of wood, fireplaces on both floors; we actually cooked things in those fireplaces — it kind of felt like a big family dining room, and the kitchen felt like it extended into the restaurant.

A federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order on Tuesday that prevents the publication of online 3D blueprints for plastic yet deadly guns.

U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik said the untraceable weapons — which bear no serial numbers and can be printed from directions downloaded from the Internet — could end up in the wrong hands, The Associated Press reported.

Enter to win Slow Fires by Justin Smillie

Aug 1, 2018

August 2018 Giveaway

Mid-luxury brands say no to discounted goods

Jul 31, 2018

Fashion house, Ralph Lauren posted a better-than-expected earnings report Tuesday. Net income increased to $109 million this quarter and shares in the company have risen 31 percent since the beginning of the year. The high-end apparel maker — known for the iconic Polo shirt — cut back on discounts and focused on selling more products at full price. It seems that when it comes to luxury goods, exclusivity is key to business growth.

Why a comment on a tariff exemption application could make or break business

Jul 31, 2018

As the Department of Commerce continues to grant and reject steel tariff exemption applications, we check back in with Sam Desai in South Plainfield, New Jersey, whose company makes parts for appliances. He shares his frustration with how objection comments can derail an exemption application. That frustration is also familiar to Kate Karol, counsel at a law firm in Detroit with a lot of clients in the auto industry waiting to hear about their exemption applications. 

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We hear all the time that the labor market is strong. Unemployment is at record lows. Most qualified workers aren’t out looking for a job because they have one already. So employers are eager to keep their workers, and keep them happy. Happy enough to pay them more? It appears so.

Your shopping bill could be getting noticeably higher. Procter & Gamble today announced it's planning to raise prices on a lot of its products, including Bounty paper towels and Puffs tissues. One reason for those increases? P&G is having to pay a lot for wood pulp, which is basically what paper towels, diapers and toilet paper are made from.

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Most Americans don't consume a lot of ginseng, or even think about the crop, aside from the occasional tea or energy drink. But in rural central Wisconsin, people think about ginseng a lot. It's an economic driver for the state, which produces nearly all the American ginseng and sells most of it to China at a premium. 

75: A little Wisconsin root in a big trade war

Jul 31, 2018

Journalists love to list the disparate items caught up in the trade war. Blue jeans! Cranberries! Bourbon! Ginseng! There's something giddy about the seeming randomness of it. But lists of tariffs are not random. They're made by actual people looking very carefully at products and politics across international borders. Former U.S. trade official Matt Gold used to help make those lists. He makes us smart on how governments in a trade war take a gimlet eye to literally every product that exists in the world. And we take a dive into one tariff story: ginseng.

Why is CBS keeping CEO Les Moonves on board?

Jul 31, 2018

Leslie Moonves, the CEO of CBS, will continue leading the company while it investigates sexual misconduct claims against him.

The board of CBS met on Monday, releasing a statement shortly after that it was "in the process of selecting outside counsel to conduct an independent investigation," but that "no other action was taken on this matter."   

“If I didn’t have my grandparents, I would definitely be in a shelter right now,” said Stephanie Snowball just hours before picking her three-year-old daughter and seven-year-old son from daycare in Salt Lake City. The 34-year-old single mother has one source of income: state assistance for food and childcare. She tries to save on expenses whenever she can. Most weekdays, it means picking her kids up from daycare around 5:30 pm, right after dinnertime.

“They like the food,” she said.

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