National/International

President Donald Trump vowed back in 2016 that his presidency would block the mega-merger between AT&T and Time Warner. Today, a federal judge decided otherwise. We'll talk about how we got here and what happens next. Plus, in light of the historic summit in Singapore and the Fed meeting today and tomorrow, we'll put the American and North Korean economies in context. 

For the first time, a sitting American president met with the leader of North Korea to talk about denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. The meeting took place in the diplomatically neutral city-state island of Singapore on Tuesday.

As part of his pitch, President Donald Trump showed North Korean leader Kim Jong Un a video to sell him on what the future of his country could be if it gave up its nuclear weapons.

How the energy boom shaped a small town in rural America

Jun 12, 2018

When a fracking company came to a small community in rural Pennsylvania, many people signed the lease that allowed the company to access the natural gas resources on their land. Among them was Stacey Haney, who at that time owned a small farm. Haney saw the lease as a way to support American energy, and like many other people, a way to get some extra money to support life. But money is not the only thing fracking brought to the town, and people like Haney ended up paying a price. 

Why North Korea's priority isn't its underdeveloped economy

Jun 12, 2018

President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un agreed to take steps to build a "peace regime" on the Korean peninsula after Tuesday's bilateral summit in Singapore. 

In a signed statement from the two leaders, Kim reaffirmed his country's commitment to ceasing its nuclear development program, but no specific steps or benchmarks for the denuclearization process were listed in the signed statement from the two leaders. 

(Markets Edition) Despite a headline-heavy week, with President Trump meeting North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, the markets haven't been moving all that much. We'll discuss why the historic summit hasn't really affected them, and then we'll chat with Leon Sigal, director of the Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project, about Kim Jong-Un's goals during the talks. It turns out that North Korea's relationship with the U.S. may not be about aid or investment.

Philadelphia City Council is expected to vote this week on what some members see as a potential solution to the city’s affordable housing problem — a 1 percent tax that could fund rental construction and help qualifying home buyers make down payments on houses. But the proposal is controversial.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The Federal Open Market Committee begins its two-day meeting today to talk interest rates. The Fed is expected to raise its target rate by a quarter of a point for the second time this year. And with unemployment reaching a new low last month and inflation creeping up, analysts expect officials to keep raising rates throughout the year. If short-term yields keep rising, that could lead to what’s called an inverted yield curve, when short-term term rates are higher than long-term borrowing costs.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

North Korea: The Movie

Jun 12, 2018

(U.S. Edition) President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un met at a historic summit this Tuesday, signing a statement calling for the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. One tactic Trump used in his talks: a fake movie trailer presenting two different paths for North Korea. We'll look at the purpose of the video, and what Trump had to say about economic sanctions on the country.

(Global Edition) This morning: A commitment to denuclearization on the Korean peninsula. We’ll bring you the very latest from the historic summit between President Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, and explain the long-term political and economic implications. Afterward, President Trump said the issue of human rights in North Korea was discussed “relatively briefly”  at today’s summit.” But it’s a major issue for those who still live under the Kim regime.

It takes "thousands of hours" to comply with GDPR, says one tech CEO

Jun 12, 2018

The European Union's new privacy rule, called the General Data Protection Regulation, is officially in effect. To comply with it, some small businesses and startups have had to put other work on hold. The GDPR requires companies that have European customers to get clear consent to gather their information, make data available to correct and even delete data if the customer asks. And the fines for not complying are huge. Lawrence Coburn is CEO of a company called DoubleDutch that makes mobile apps for conferences.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET Tuesday

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signed a broad statement Tuesday that calls for a "firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula," after their historic summit in Singapore — the first ever meeting between a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader.

You can't help but be a little underwhelmed.

The International House of Pancakes tweeted last week that it would be rebranding from IHOP to IHOb, with a promise to announce what it stood for a few days later.

It's been a year since Amazon acquired Whole Foods, and the company announced today Prime members in 10 more states are eligible for special deals at the store. With Amazon getting deeper into the grocery business, competitors have had to up their digital game ... and also improve delivery services. So what are they doing to compete?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

President Donald Trump backed out of a joint statement with the other six countries of the G-7 and lashed out at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Twitter after Trudeau said Canada would push forward with retaliatory tariffs. A photo from the weekend kind of sums it all up: Trump's seated, arms crossed, eyebrows raised, while everyone else in the frame stands over him, including Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. It has a Trump-against-the-world feel to it, which is increasingly how Trump’s trade policies are shaping up.

Those might sound the same, but in practice they're very, very different. Under President Obama, the Federal Communications Commission mandated that internet service providers treat all internet traffic the same. Today, those net neutrality rules were officially rolled back. We had Chairman Ajit Pai on to talk about what will change, how he measures success and what happens if his vision for an open internet doesn't work. Plus, it’s been a year since Amazon acquired Whole Foods. How has Amazon’s entry changed the grocery business?

Today marks the official end of net neutrality rules. Put in place during the Obama administration, net neutrality rules prevented internet service providers from discriminating when it comes to content by slowing down the delivery of information for some content providers while speeding up others.

The U.S. government wants to borrow a fortune

Jun 11, 2018

(Markets Edition) With the FCC officially repealing net neutrality rules today, we'll look at what this could mean for your internet experience and the services you use. Afterwards, we'll explore why the U.S. government wants to borrow $200 billion from the markets, and then we'll discuss how the proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner might shake out.

Most college students in the US are making plans for the summer. For some of the many Puerto Rican college students who came to the mainland to continue their studies after Hurricane Maria roared through the island last September, this time of the year brings a more complex question — whether to stay or go back home.

In Singapore, on the eve of the nuclear summit, they’re naming cocktails after leaders Kim and Trump. But a bit more seriously, the service sector for which Singapore is known — and one reason it was chosen — is kicking into high gear.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Today is the day when so-called net neutrality rules no longer apply to the internet. Last year, the Federal Communications Commission repealed the rules that had prevented internet providers from playing favorites, by, for instance, offering faster service to customers who pay more for it. What comes next?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

This weekend's G-7 summit: "The geopolitical equivalent of Trump firing Comey"

Jun 11, 2018

President Donald Trump refused to sign a joint statement at this weekend's G-7 summit after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau complained of U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs at a news conference. 

Trudeau's remarks at the conference prompted Trump to lash out against him on Twitter. 

Trump - Europe + North Korea = ?

Jun 11, 2018

(U.S. Edition) President Donald Trump is preparing to meet with North Korean President Kim Jong-Un in Singapore. We'll look at how much the area is spending to host the two leaders, and what both countries are hoping to get out of this meeting. Afterwards, we'll recap this weekend's G7 summit between various world leaders, which includes the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and Germany. According to Ian Bremmer, founder of political risk consultancy the Eurasia Group, this was the geopolitical equivalent of Trump firing Comey.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The countdown begins for the summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong-un. We take you to Singapore, where the two leaders are meeting to see what both sides are hoping for, and how the island is preparing for the historic gathering. Then, despite Brexit and populist debates on immigration and jobs on the continent, encouraging news from EY, a global organization that provides advisory services, shows foreign direct investment in Europe is on the rise.

Why the end of net neutrality might look good ... at first

Jun 11, 2018

Pending some surprise moves by the House of Representatives, net neutrality will officially be repealed today. Those regulations prevented internet providers from blocking or interfering with or discriminating against the content they distribute. Now critics say cable and wireless broadband providers can block access to any site they want, charge more for services that compete with what they might offer — like Netflix or Hulu — and create paid fast lanes or even high-priced bundles that include some sites and exclude others. So what's likely to happen and when?

Pending some surprise moves by the House of Representatives, net neutrality will officially be repealed today. Those regulations prevented internet providers from blocking or interfering with or discriminating against the content they distribute. Now critics say cable and wireless broadband providers can block access to any site they want, charge more for services that compete with what they might offer — like Netflix or Hulu — and create paid fast lanes or even high-priced bundles that include some sites and exclude others. So what's likely to happen and when?

Updated at 11:23 p.m. ET

After one White House adviser said there was "a special place in hell" for foreign leaders like Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and another said Trudeau "stabbed us in the back," Canadian leaders offered a measured — even polite — response.

How U.S. trade policy has changed over 30 years

Jun 8, 2018

I'm pretty sure that this is a mutually acceptable statement of reality: Global trade is hard. There are competing interests, international geopolitics and economic pressures from every angle. But for at least the last 30 years, the trend has been toward more, not less, free trade. That makes where we are today with trade policy in this country all the more noteworthy, and why we made a timeline looking back at 30 years of U.S. trade policy.

1988

More than 90 percent of millennials eventually want to buy a house, according to the National Association of Home Builders. That can seem really far off for recent graduates, but there are a few steps to take right now that will make it easier in the future. But how do you pay off student loans, build credit, pay rent and save all at the same time? Delia Fernandez, a personal financial planner, sat down with Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O'Leary to discuss.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

On a recent Saturday in May, the atrium at Cleveland’s Metro Health Hospital was the site of a typical-looking job fair — people in suits shook hands and swapped business cards with company reps who sat behind tables adorned with mounds of branded freebies. Among the 24 companies, there were some big names including Starbucks, PNC Bank and Progressive Insurance.

Floating from table to table, leather portfolio in hand, was Nicolette Baldwin. After about 90 minutes, Baldwin had spoken with reps from nearly every company there.

Ronald Reagan said that 30 years ago in a weekly radio address about protectionism. For decades, the global economy has trended toward more free trade, not less. We're going to spend a few minutes today charting how we got here, from that speech through the next four administrations and up to our current moment, on the brink of a trade war. But first, we'll talk about the gathering of world leaders in Canada this weekend and America's place in it. Is it really the G-7? Or the G-6 plus one? We'll talk about it.

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