National/International

A deal within reach on NAFTA?

Apr 6, 2018

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is taking the lead in the latest round of talks on the North American Free Trade Agreement, scheduled for today. President Donald Trump has threatened to pull out of NAFTA, unless it’s renegotiated. That’s easier said than done, though and there are still a number of stumbling blocks.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

This story was updated at 7:49 a.m. CT. 

U.S. employers added a modest 103,000 jobs in March after several months of bigger gains, though the government's overall jobs report suggests that the labor market remains healthy.

The Labor Department said Friday that the unemployment rate remained 4.1 percent, a 17-year low, for a sixth straight month. Average hourly pay ticked up, climbing 2.7 percent compared with a year earlier.

04/06/2018: Don't forget about NAFTA

Apr 6, 2018

(U.S. Edition) China is responding to President Trump after he called for an additional $100 billion in tariffs, saying they are prepared to fight the U.S. "at any cost." How are America's trade partners feeling about this, though? On today's show, we'll look at whether Europe is supportive of the White House. Afterwards, with the release of today's jobs report, we'll talk about why there hasn't been much of an increase in job growth. Then, we'll discuss what NAFTA negotiations currently look like and what hurdles still need to be cleared.

Apple will reportedly replace Intel processors with its own microchips

Apr 6, 2018

Apple might be getting in the chip business. Bloomberg reported earlier this week that Apple plans to replace Intel processors in Mac computers with microchips of its own. The move would stem from Apple’s strategy of making all of its devices — like Macs, iPhones and iPads — work more like each other and more seamlessly.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… The war of words between China and the U.S. on tariffs is continuing to escalate. The two nations have largely stood on their own in calling each other’s trade practices unfair, but at what point will other nations step in? Then, starting today, thirsty shoppers buying sugary drinks in the U.K. can expect a hefty tax on their purchases – a rule aimed at cutting obesity rates and encouraging healthier choices. Various parts of the U.S. have tried it, but has it worked?

04/06/2018: Apple may go solo in microchips

Apr 6, 2018

Apple might be getting in the chip business. Bloomberg reported earlier this week that Apple plans to replace Intel processors in Mac computers with microchips of its own. The move would stem from Apple’s strategy of making all of its devices — like Macs, iPhones and iPads — work more like each other and more seamlessly. Marketplace Tech host Jon Gordon spoke with Dwight Silverman, the tech editor at the Houston Chronicle, about what’s behind the move. 

President Donald Trump has instructed the U.S. trade representative to consider slapping $100 billion in additional tariffs on Chinese goods.

The move comes a day after China issued a $50 billion list of U.S. goods including soybeans and small aircraft for possible tariff hikes in an escalating and potentially damaging dispute.

Trying to squeeze through the pass-through loophole

Apr 5, 2018

People have taxes on their minds this time of year. But some business owners are preoccupied with planning for next year’s taxes, because of a big new deduction in the tax overhaul. It’s supposed to be for small business owners who report their business income on their individual tax returns. They’re called pass-through businesses, because their profits are “passed through” to the owner’s personal tax return and taxed at their individual rate.

With the announced Chinese tariffs on U.S. exports, things are looking pretty tough if you're a farmer, and more so if you're a farmer in Iowa. Five of the state's central agriculture products — soybeans, corn, ethanol, beef and pork — would be hit if the tariffs go into effect. And that's a big deal for the Iowa farmers who depend on Chinese markets.

Tariff jitters are rippling through the ag economy

Apr 5, 2018

Yesterday on the show, Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked apples, hogs and tariffs. Today it’s the original white meat. Chickens weren't directly named on the list of proposed tariffs Beijing put out yesterday, but as it is a global agriculture economy, a potential trade war has implications for the poultry industry as well. Ryssdal called up Ed Fryar, the CEO of Ozark Mountain Poultry in Batesville, Arkansas, to check in. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation:

The trade deficit — all the goods and services we buy from overseas, minus what other countries buy from us — is President Donald Trump's key economic irritant. He's cited it when threatening to raise tariffs and tear up trade deals like NAFTA. We just got the February trade report this morning from the Department of Commerce, and for the sixth month in a row, our trade deficit has grown, despite Trump's promises to shrink it. It may not be his fault though, and we'll explain why. Then: Yesterday we talked to several Americans about what the potential trade war between China and the U.S.

In Shanghai, few worry over U.S-China trade spat

Apr 5, 2018

China's government issued a list of some $50 billion worth of U.S. exports yesterday that could be subjected to tariffs — everything from soybeans to airplane parts. 

It described the measure as a defensive move after the Trump administration announced plans Tuesday to hike duties on 1,300 types of Chinese exports, also valued at $50 billion. Neither country has yet imposed the levies.

"Both sides have put their lists on the table," China's Vice Finance Minister Zhu Guangyao told reporters on Wednesday. "It's time for negotiations."

How rethinking your job search can help you find the ideal career

Apr 5, 2018

You're familiar with the job search process: it's stressful, it's tedious, it's hard to figure out what you actually want to do, and sometimes it feels like you're just sending your resume into the abyss.

But maybe there's a different way to approach it. Dev Aujla, CEO of the recruiting firm Catalog, shares tips in a new book called, "50 Ways to Get a Job: An Unconventional Guide to Finding Work on Your Terms." 

As the tariff fight between China and the United States escalates, retailers are worried. They say U.S. tariffs on Chinese products could result in higher prices and have some other unintended consequences.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Markets Edition) Facebook stock has fallen 16 percent since news broke that a third-party firm took user data to help the Trump campaign. With some in Congress potentially looking to adopt European data privacy rules, we'll look at what those currently look like. Afterwards, we'll chat with Diane Swonk — chief economist at the consulting firm Grant Thornton — about what we might expect from the release of tomorrow's jobs report. Plus: How reducing immigration would affect the labor market. 

What role do immigrants play in U.S. labor force?

Apr 5, 2018

President Donald Trump and many congressional Republicans are pursuing policies to reduce legal immigration to the United States, with proposals to prioritize admission for highly skilled and well-educated immigrants over those with family ties to residents and by deporting undocumented immigrants currently living and working in the U.S.

Meanwhile, the unemployment rate has fallen toward 4 percent, and employers increasingly say they're experiencing worker shortages.

04/05/2018: How to get your dream job

Apr 5, 2018

(U.S. Edition) Both the U.S. and China have published a proposed list of goods from the other other that they may hit with tariffs. But that's what they are for now — proposals. We'll look at what steps have to come before anything goes into effect, and then discuss how these tariffs would impact retailers. Plus: a conversation with Dev Aujla, CEO of the recruiting firm Catalog and author of the new book "50 Ways to Get a Job," about how to navigate your job search. 

04/05/2018: Why space junk is becoming a big deal

Apr 5, 2018

There is a lot of junk in space. And there looks to be more coming as private companies send more satellites into low-Earth orbit. Last week, SpaceX got conditional approval from the Federal Communications Commission to launch more than 4,000 satellites. Marketplace Tech host Jon Gordon speaks with Marcia Smith, editor at SpacePolicyOnline.com, about what happens when all those satellites — new and old — eventually stop working. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After a marathon session, Brazil’s supreme court ruled against one of its country’s most beloved politicians, rejecting a plea from former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva to avoid prison as he appeals a corruption conviction. We’ll take you to Sao Palo where the nation’s citizens – and highest court – are deeply divided. Then, artificial intelligence researchers are claiming victory after boycotting a Korean institute over concerns about killer robots.

Launching a satellite? Watch out for space junk

Apr 5, 2018

There is a lot of junk in space. And there looks to be more coming as private companies send more satellites into low-Earth orbit. Last week, SpaceX got conditional approval from the Federal Communications Commission to launch more than 4,000 satellites. Marketplace Tech host Jon Gordon speaks with Marcia Smith, editor at SpacePolicyOnline.com, about what happens when all those satellites — new and old — eventually stop working. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

Hurricane Maria raked nearly all of Puerto Rico's agriculture off the island when the storm pummeled the country in September 2017. Farmland was destroyed, home gardens were devastated, trees lost all of their leaves - even their bark. The people there are now working to rebuild not only their cities, but their food supply. As field producer and contributor Daniella Cheslow reports, some agronomists hope a donation of half a million dollars in seeds will cultivate local gardening and farming. Listen on audio player above.

PHOTO GALLERY

The unfortunate reality about seeds is that most are not bred and selected for flavor. Rather, they are chosen specifically for the yield, uniformity and shelf stability of their fruit or vegetable. Chef Dan Barber wants to change that. The chef-owner of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns wants to help create seeds that bring forth new foods with unexpected and unique flavors. Which is why he - along with seedsman Matthew Goldfarb and seed breeder Michael Mazourek - cofounded of a new seed company called Row 7.

What does a trade war mean for the U.S. economy?

Apr 4, 2018

Right out the gate, let's set the record straight: Threats have been made and specific items have been listed, but no new tariffs have been put into effect. But what does it all mean for the economy? Let's break it down. 

The fundamentals of an American economy:

Facebook now says that up to 87 million people -- most of them in the U.S. -- may have had their data shared with Cambridge Analytica.  That's much greater than the previously reported estimate that about 50 million users had their data scraped.

China's threatened tariffs on pork are hurting American hog farmers

Apr 4, 2018

The Chinese consume over 50 million tons of pork annually, and part of that meat is from U.S. farms. After the Chinese government announced its 25 percent tariffs on U.S. pork, Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked to Bran Duncan, a hog farmer and vice president of the Illinois Farm Bureau, about how it will affect his business. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

What China's tariff retaliation means for apple growers

Apr 4, 2018

Fresh and dried apples are two of the products on the list of proposed tariffs that China's Ministry of Commerce announced this week. The proposed 15 percent tariff is very big deal up in Washington. It’s the No. 1 apple-producing state in the country and the source of $50 million worth of apples exported to China last year.

Your trade war questions, answered

Apr 4, 2018

The Chinese government today threatened to slap tariffs on 106 American products, including the nation’s largest exports: pork, soybeans, beef, fruit and nuts. Wine and recycled aluminum are on the list of potentially taxed exports as well. This new round of threats has got us asking a lot of questions, including: What happens if this whole thing goes economically south?

04/04/2018: Your trade war questions, answered

Apr 4, 2018

We should be clear from the jump: China and the U.S. are trading specific, escalating threats of tariffs, but none have actually gone into effect. So you could call it a "trade war," but it really isn't ... yet. Still, you all have a lot of questions about what might happen if this cold trade war heats up. We'll start today's show with the economic fundamentals, then do our best to answer those questions. There's even more on Marketplace.org. Plus: A look at what will happen to America's agriculture industry if no one blinks in this macroeconomic game of chicken.

(Markets Edition) In the wake of yesterday's shooting at YouTube, we talk with workplace violence consultant Larry Barton about the measures companies should take to create a safer environment. Also on today's show: a conversation with Tom Sheck from our investigative unit APM Reports about the resignation of DJ Gribbin, Trump's point person on his infrastructure bill. What did Trump have planned, and what does Gribbin's departure mean for the bill? 

What companies can do to combat workplace violence

Apr 4, 2018

As you've been hearing, a shooting at Alphabet-Google's YouTube yesterday has left three wounded and the assailant dead. Authorities say Nasim Aghdam of San Diego used to try to make money off her videos on YouTube, but felt censored and ripped off. 

The violent incident raises questions about how workplaces can help protect their employees — and deal with the ones who feel aggrieved. 

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