preservation

WBFO News file photo / WBFO News

The Board of Trustees for the Chautauqua Institution voted to take bids on the reconstruction of the historic amphitheater.

Buffalo Spree

The March issue of Buffalo Spree is labeled "The Interview Issue."  The magazine's writers sat down with 20 prominent Western New Yorkers, asking them questions on a range of topics.  WBFO's Mark Scott has more in this week's Press Pass with Buffalo Spree Editor Elizabeth Licata.

Chautauqua Institution / WBFO News

Officials at the Chautauqua Institution have decided to delay plans for rebuilding the historic amphitheater.

Chris Caya/WBFO News

The fight to save an East side Catholic church is not over. A city lawmaker is vowing to save the building from demolition.

Wikimedia Commons

The historic Trico Plant No. 1 on the edge of downtown Buffalo won't be designated a local landmark. The Common Council deadlocked in a 4-4 vote Tuesday.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

The push is on to save a large piece of Buffalo's industrial heritage. Preservationists are urging city lawmakers to give the Trico building landmark status.

WBFO News photos by Eileen Buckley

Preservationists at a public meeting Thursday night argued the Trico plant on the edge of downtown Buffalo should be saved and could be a real asset to the adjacent Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

A North Buffalo landmark will soon be just a memory. The city is not going to prevent the demolition of a fire-damaged former church.

Photo courtesy of Buffalo Spree

An historic building at Main and Allen Streets in Buffalo was months, if not weeks,  away from collapsing.  But as we hear in this week's Press Pass, it's now on a path to being saved.

The building at 918 and 920 Main Street was constructed in 1891 to house a company known as the Bosche Carriage Repository.  Buffalo Spree Editor Elizabeth Licata wrote about the landmark in her monthly Preservation Ready column in the September issue.  She says it was designed by architect Cyrus Porter who is known for several famous buildings locally, including the Cyclorama.

WBFO News by Mike Desmond

Another preservation battle continues along the Lake Erie waterfront.   The debate over the decaying former Bethlehem Steel administration office building features some familiar arguments.

On the outside, windows are often boarded-up or broken. The roof may or may not be falling apart and the ornamental trees out front are almost out of control. 

But some wonder, is the building shot?

Demolition planned for Bethlehem Steel structure

May 17, 2012

A remnant of the Buffalo area's steel-making glory days is facing demolition.

Crews are planning to start tearing down the original Bethlehem Steel administration building in Lackawanna on Friday.
    
Built in the Beaux Arts style in 1902, the crumbling, overgrown structure is located on the former Bethlehem Steel's Lake Erie waterfront complex.

The building has been vacant for 30 years, and is owned by a shipping business.

An historic preservation group is weighing in on hydrofracking for the first tim, and they don't like what they say they’ve been learning about the gas drilling process.

They say it would change the nature of the landscape from rural to industrial and would detract from heritage tourism in the Marcellus shale region.

Every year, the state’s leading historic preservation group, the Preservation League, lists historic sites that they believe are endangered, known as New York’s Seven To Save.

The massive Trico plant complex on Goodell is now the object of a familiar community debate: preserve or demolish?

Hours after the city Preservation Board recommended last night the vast complex be listed as a historic landmark, Preservation Buffalo Niagara held a public meeting in the Common Council Chambers to talk about what to do with the deteriorating industrial complex.

Trico is a hodge-podge of buildings from different times built for different uses and the roof is shot, letting water and snow inside.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

The new, ten story federal courthouse officially opens for business Monday.  As WBFO's Mark Scott reports, federal officials are hailing the new building's design.  But not everyone is enamored by it.

The new courthouse in Niagara Square across from City Hall is finally finished.  Its opening was delayed for many months when a moisture problem was discovered.  Federal court staffers have spent the past several weeks moving in.  And Monday morning, a ceremonial flag raising was held to mark the first day of business. 

Buffalo Spree photo/Joe Cascio

A vacant library building has been shuttered for six years in Buffalo's Central Park neighborhood.  The Fairfield was closed as part of consolidation.  But Buffalo Spree editor Elizabeth Licata says neighbors are frustrated and the city doesn't seem to be revealing future redevelopment plans.

WBFO'S Eileen Buckley welcomes Licata to our weekly Press Pass interview line-up as they discuss Licata's on-going Buffalo Spree series called "Preservation Ready" that focuses on the Fairfield Library.

19th century West Side building to be transformed

Oct 25, 2011

A 19th century building on Buffalo's West Side is being transformed into a 14-unit apartment building.

West Side residents and local officials gathered at White's Livery Stable Monday afternoon on Buffalo's West Side to celebrate the commencement of a rehabilitation project that will convert the structure into fourteen new apartments.

Mayor Byron Brown thanked neighborhood residents for their patience and appreciation of the historic building which had posed a safety issue when it began crumbling a few years ago.

Buffalo welcomes preservation conference

Oct 18, 2011

 More than 2,000 people are expected to participate in this week's National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference in Buffalo.   While the formal opening ceremony takes place Wednesday, students at Buffalo's Waterfront Elementary School were busy Tuesday raising a scaled-down classic American structure, a barn.  Among those watching the barn raising was Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic preservation.