ride sharing

Edwin LoVallo

Vincent LoVallo is an Uber driver. Yes, it is the same Vincent LoVallo who used to be Buffalo’s streets commissioner, mayoral chief of staff and City councilmember. He said ride-hailing coming to Buffalo is similar to when food trucks first came to the area.

Elected officials are demanding more information on the ride sharing agreements between Lyft, Uber and the NFTA.

Lyft

Lyft says it has already recruited thousands of potential drivers ahead of its upstate New York launch later this month.

After less than a year as president of Uber, Jeff Jones is leaving the embattled ride-hailing company, Uber confirms.

"We want to thank Jeff for his six months at the company and wish him all the best," an Uber spokesperson says in a statement.

Jones, previously Target's chief marketing officer, was brought on by CEO Travis Kalanick last fall to boost Uber's reputation.

It is not just facts and figures about what taxes to collect and how to spend them. Governor Cuomo's budget plan  also contains unrelated changes — everything from allowing ride-hailing services to expand in the state to enacting ethics reforms.


WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

It appears that state lawmakers have adjourned their business for the year.

WBFO File Photo

In Albany’s own version of Groundhog Day, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders are still keeping open the possibility of a special session before the year ends that could include legalizing ride-sharing services statewide and a pay raise for lawmakers.


Supporters of Lyft, Uber urge Upstate approval

May 20, 2016
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

State lawmakers are being pressed to allow transport services, such as Uber and Lyft, to operate in Upstate New York. Supporters of those services gathered outside Kleinhans Music Hall Thursday to urge quick passage.


Buffalo CarShare facing a dead end

May 13, 2015
Chris Caya WBFO News

Thousands of residents may soon be out of a ride. The carrier that insures Buffalo CarShare is dropping the six-year-old non-profit because New York's outdated "no-fault" insurance law makes coverage too risky for insurance companies.