Science/Technology

Up to about 100,000 years ago, our human ancestors coexisted with Neanderthals in Europe and interbred with them for thousands of years. The Neanderthals eventually went extinct, but many of us still carry around fragments of Neanderthal DNA.

“Everybody whose genetic roots are outside Africa [is] partly descended from Neanderthals,” says Svante Paabo, a geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. “So there are billions of people, in the order of six, seven billion people, who actually carry parts of the genome of Neanderthals today.”

The Future, Coming ‘Soonish’

Oct 28, 2017

Is It Time For CRISPR 2.0?

Oct 28, 2017

In Defense Of Spiders

Oct 28, 2017

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 26, 2017

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 25, 2017

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 25, 2017

The trouble with managing America’s wild horses

Oct 24, 2017

Around 75,000 wild horses roam the valleys and mountain ranges of the American West, descendants of long ago runaways. The horses have been protected by federal law since the early 1970s, but according to the Bureau of Land Management, their numbers are now almost three times what today’s range can support.

In New York, a whale of a comeback story

Oct 24, 2017
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Mathieu Belanger/Reuters

When you think of New York wildlife, whales probably aren’t the first animals that come to mind — but they’re actually native to the waters around the city. After disappearing from New York waters about a century ago because of pollution and overfishing, the massive animals are returning home.

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