Science/Technology

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 23, 2017

In praise of boredom: Researchers dish on the brain benefits of idle time

Oct 22, 2017

When’s the last time you were really, truly bored?

In an age of smartphones, social media and a 24-hour news cycle, it might be tough to recall the last time you found yourself turning your attention to absolutely nothing. But that mental downtime, it turns out, is when a very important part of your brain gets to work.

Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people whose properties have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana’s 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating flood risk for decades.

Flood and repeat

The Health Risks That Follow A Wildfire

Oct 21, 2017

How glow worms get their glow on

Oct 17, 2017

Visitors to certain New Zealand caves are treated to an amazing sight: Thousands of little lights twinkling on the cave walls, like Christmas lights. But the little lights aren’t bulbs or even fireflies — they’re glow worms.

“Technically, a glow worm is actually a glowing maggot, but that doesn't sound as romantic," says Miriam Sharpe, a biochemistry researcher at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

We’re the biggest culprits behind wildfires. Now what?

Oct 16, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwssoutheast/4971832860/">Josh O&rsquo;Connor/USFWS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/">Public domain</a>. Image cropped.

In the United States, this year’s wildfire season has been wild, to say the least. Roughly 50,000 fires have scorched more than 8.5 million acres across the country, hitting the Pacific Northwest, California and Montana particularly hard.

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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cdcglobal/8271756665/">CDC Global</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>

In remote areas of the world, traditional lab testing for malaria can be difficult. That’s where the malaria rapid diagnostic test comes in.

From Hollywood to here: ‘Rememory’ and the future of memory

Oct 14, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/3792906411/">Neil Conway</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

In the recent film “Rememory,” an inventor has built a device that can extract memories from the brain. There’s more to the story — a murder, for one, and an amateur sleuth played by Peter Dinklage — but let’s pause here. How close are we in real life to being able to record our memories, Hollywood-style?

Writing The Fantastic In 2017

Oct 14, 2017

To The Moon, And…Beyond?

Oct 14, 2017

Jane Goodall And Her Life In The Wild

Oct 14, 2017

The World Of Bitcoin Economics

Oct 7, 2017

A Homecoming For The Whales

Oct 7, 2017

Science Club Challenge: Grab A Neat Rock

Oct 7, 2017

Big Trouble Managing Mustangs

Oct 7, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/philip-ester/5216780198">StingrayPhil</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

You may not envy what dung beetles and carrion beetles dine on, but you live in a world that they help keep clean. Think of the insects as “nature’s recyclers,” decomposing waste and returning all kinds of nutrients back into the ecosystem.

At a recent live show in Wichita, Kansas, Science Friday host Ira Flatow talked with Rachel Stone and Emmy Engasser, graduate researchers at Wichita State University’s biodiversity lab, about this powerful natural cleanup crew. Here are some surprising takeaways from their conversation:

How scientists are piecing together the story of ancient Americans

Oct 1, 2017

The Americas were one of the last areas of the world to be settled by modern humans, and we know that one of the first migrant groups, known as the Clovis people, lived here around 13,000 years ago.

The ABCs Of Nuclear War

Sep 30, 2017

When it comes to getting new drugs on the market, testing and clinical trials can take years — but patients with rare or life-threatening illnesses don’t always have that long to wait.

To treat these patients, the Food and Drug Administration accelerates approval of some promising drugs, letting them onto the market based on physical indicators and lab measurements. But afterward, manufacturers must conduct post-approval clinical trials to confirm the drugs’ safety and efficacy.

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