Science/Technology

A Mathy Makeover For The Kilogram

Jul 8, 2017

Climate change is coming to your coffee cup

Jul 6, 2017

When it comes to coffee, Ethiopia is sacred ground.

It’s the home of Coffea arabica — one of the most popular species of coffee bean. And in Ethiopia, coffee is a major part of the economy: It makes up about a quarter of the country’s export earnings, and around 15 million farmers make a living farming the crop.

The key to eating more veggies? Trick your brain.

Jul 2, 2017

If you’ve ever scanned a restaurant menu and found yourself torn between the “sizzling grilled sirloin” and the healthy option, “8-oz sirloin steak,” you’re not alone. The healthier one doesn’t sound nearly as mouthwatering, does it?

What theoretical physics says about the future of our government

Jul 2, 2017

We’ve all heard campaigning politicians — especially those who want to be president of the United States — say that if elected, they’ll fix what’s wrong in Washington. But what if the tangle of issues faced by our government is just too complex for one person to manage?

Take a dazzling new peek at Jupiter

Jul 1, 2017

Jupiter may be one of the planets we can spot with the naked eye, but scientists have long puzzled over what lies beneath its swirling clouds — or inside its stormy Great Red Spot.

Could an Amazon pharmacy be a prescription for industry change?

Jul 1, 2017

These days, you can find just about anything on Amazon — from toilet paper to textbooks and even groceries. For now, though, there’s still something you won’t find on the site: prescription drugs.

Flu? There’s A Patch For That

Jul 1, 2017

Curiosity Gets An AI Upgrade

Jul 1, 2017

The Polar Bear Necessities

Jul 1, 2017

The natural sunscreen of the future

Jun 30, 2017

Whether you fry in the sun or hardly seem to burn at all depends on something you can’t change: the amount of pigment, or melanin, in your skin. But what if you could add melanin to sunscreens for better sun protection?

In the future, we may come close: Researchers reporting in Science have developed a melaninlike substance that can be tuned to dark and light shades, corresponding with different degrees of protection against the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

Finding an Earthly home for the Thirty Meter Telescope

Jun 28, 2017

Named for the diameter of its mirror, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT, for short) will some day see 10 to 100 times farther in the sky than existing telescopes — far enough, scientists hope, to glimpse exoplanets and some of the oldest objects in the universe.

How actress Hedy Lamarr became the ‘mother of Wi-Fi’

Jun 25, 2017

Known as “the most beautiful woman in the world,” Hollywood actress Hedy Lamarr starred in dozens of films over a career that spanned decades.

But there was more to Lamarr than met the eye. An avid inventor, she worked on everything from a tablet that, when dropped into water, fizzed into instant cola, to frequency hopping — a World War II-era secure communications technology that’s used today in wireless internet, GPS and cellphones.

Caught On Video: How DNA Replicates

Jun 24, 2017

Baby Boxes, Singing Fish, And E-DNA

Jun 24, 2017

Getting To Know The Placenta

Jun 24, 2017

Tired of jogging? There’s an exosuit for that.

Jun 20, 2017

Talk about suiting up for a jog — researchers have developed an exosuit that helps runners use less energy.

The ensemble is no stiff, Iron Man-style exoskeleton — it looks more like a pair of belted spandex shorts. In the study, recently published in Science Robotics, researchers say that wearing the suit can cut the metabolic cost of a treadmill run by 5.4 percent.

For fish, the good and bad of warming ocean waters

Jun 19, 2017

As ocean temperatures rise, what will happen to the fish we eat?

According to a recent study published in “Progress in Oceanography,” some fish species will thrive in warmer waters — and others, not so much.

Using a detailed climate model and historical observation data, researchers at NOAA and The Nature Conservancy modeled the shifting thermal habitats of over 50 species along the Atlantic coast, from North Carolina to the Gulf of Maine.

How to make bionic limbs feel more natural

Jun 18, 2017
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Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

When you flex your bicep, your muscle sends information to your brain, allowing you to feel your muscle contract without even having to glance at it. But if you have a bionic limb, you don’t get that same sensory feedback.

“When I move my bionic ankles, I don’t feel the movement of the ankles, and when the torque increases on my bionic ankle joints, I don’t feel that torque,” says Hugh Herr, who co-directs the Center for Extreme Bionics at MIT, and whose legs are amputated below the knee.

Just how much science is in forensic science?

Jun 17, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/westmidlandspolice/7170656948/">West Midlands Police</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

On TV crime shows, forensic science always just manages to pinpoint the criminal in the span of a televised hour — and with 100 percent accuracy. But in real life, forensic science doesn’t always work so smoothly.

The Mindset For A Milkshake

Jun 17, 2017

The story of Magnus Hirschfeld, the ‘Einstein of sex'

Jun 14, 2017

Decades before Alfred Kinsey developed his scale for human sexuality, there was Magnus Hirschfeld — a doctor who dedicated his career to proving that homosexuality was natural.

Hirschfeld’s reasoning was simple: In turn of the 20th century Germany, where he lived, a law called Paragraph 175 made so-called “unnatural fornication” between men punishable by prison time.

Have you gotten your hands on a fidget spinner yet?

The brightly colored device can be spun, flipped and even tossed in one hand, and it’s been turning up in schools across the country.

Manufacturers say the fidget spinners can help relieve stress, but the toys have already been banned as distractions in some classrooms, sending kids back to the Stone Age of clicking pens and squeezing stress balls.

A Home For The Thirty Meter Telescope

Jun 10, 2017

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