State of the Union

File Photo / WBFO News

The visual images on television were very clear: Republicans were vocal in their praise of President Trump's State of the Union message, while Democrats were not wearing out their hands with applause. However, there was one issue that seemed to cross the aisle: infrastructure.

Updated on Jan. 31 at 12:47 a.m. ET

President Trump sought to strike a unifying tone with his first State of the Union address, but some of his rhetoric on immigration and his promise to put "America First" was clearly aimed at his base.

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address to Congress, which will be followed by a response from the Democratic Party. Journalists across the NPR newsroom will be annotating those remarks, adding fact-checks and analysis in real time. You can also watch the speeches live.

Updated at 7:16 p.m. ET

President Trump is planning a bipartisan pitch to Congress with his first State of the Union address on Tuesday, but he will have his work cut out for him with a public that is more divided than ever.

"Tonight, I want to talk about what kind of future we are going to have, and what kind of nation we are going to be. All of us, together, as one team, one people, and one American family," Trump will say, according to excerpts of the speech released by the White House.

Courtesy of YouTube

The Western New York congressional delegation is predictably split along party lines when it comes to their thoughts on President Obama's State of the Union address.


WBFO will air State of the Union speech

Jan 28, 2014
WBFO News file photo

WBFO will carry NPR's live coverage of President Obama's State of the Union speech and the Republican Response Tuesday at 9 p.m. NPR's Melissa Block will host cover and will be joined NPR National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.