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Suspect in White House ricin attack stopped at Peace Bridge

A woman suspected of sending an envelope containing the poison ricin, which was addressed to White House, has been arrested at New York-Canada border, three law enforcement officials told The Associated Press on Sunday.

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UB Law Dean reflects on Ginsburg's legacy

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Protesters swing plastic baseball bats in solidarity with Willie Henley

A beautiful late summer day and the quest for racial justice brought out a crowd to Martin Luther King Jr. Park Sunday, continuing the push for basic changes in the Buffalo Police Department.

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Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A beautiful late summer day and the quest for racial justice brought out a crowd to Martin Luther King Jr. Park Sunday, continuing the push for basic changes in the Buffalo Police Department.

Howie Hawkins 2020 Campaign

The Green Party candidate for president won’t be on the ballot in two battleground states, following court rulings last week. It's another example, the Greens say, of the difficulties third party candidates have getting on the ballot.

A decision by New Jersey leaders to raise taxes on that state’s wealthiest residents has provided new hope to advocates who want to tax the rich in New York -- but Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his budget director are throwing cold water on that proposal.

File Photo / WBFO News

New York state will begin enforcing its ban on single-use carry-out plastic bags next month after a brief hiatus of the law due to a legal challenge brought earlier this year, when those bags were temporarily allowed to be used by stores without any repercussions.

WBFO file photi

 A woman suspected of sending an envelope containing the poison ricin, which was addressed to White House, has been arrested at New York-Canada border, three law enforcement officials told The Associated Press on Sunday.

UB Law Dean reflects on Ginsburg's legacy

21 hours ago
Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of The United States

The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg continues to resonate with locals who attended her visit to the University at Buffalo last August.

Chautauqua County gets Census grant

21 hours ago

Chautauqua County recently received a grant to help raise awareness about the Census in local commuities.

Thomas O'Neil-White

An East Buffalo church partnered with a Town of Amherst church Saturday for a food drive to help fill gaps in the various food deserts on Buffalo’s East Side. This partnership is led by two women, Pastor Kwame Pitts, an African American who leads the majority white Crossroads Lutheran in Snyder, and Miranda Hammer, a white Pastor at Resurrection Lutheran Church and leader of the Community of Good Neighbors food pantry on Doat Street. 


WBFO file photo / WBFO News

The passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sent ripples through the legal field.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Thousands of absentee ballots were being mailed out Friday in parts of Western New York. As expected, concerns for COVID have resulted in a sharp rise in requests.

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Young Americans favor Joe Biden over President Trump, according to a new survey, but Trump's supporters appear more enthusiastic about that choice.

Sixty percent of likely voters under the age of 30 say they will vote for Biden, compared with 27% for Trump, according to a poll from the Harvard Kennedy School Institute of Politics out Monday. But 56% of likely voters who support the president are "very enthusiastic" about voting for him, compared with 35% of likely voters who back the Democratic nominee when asked about their enthusiasm.

From empty pizza boxes to Amazon cartons, household trash cans are overflowing with the refuse of our new, stay-at-home era — and cities are struggling to keep up.

Residential trash volume spiked as much as 25% this spring, according to the trade group Solid Waste Association of North America. It has shrunk a bit since then but remains well above pre-pandemic levels.

For garbage collectors, that means longer workdays and more trips to the dump.

The first Jewish woman on the U.S. Supreme Court, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, died Friday night as millions of American Jews were getting ready to celebrate the first night of Rosh Hashanah — the Jewish new year.

Justice Stephen Breyer learned midway through the traditional Mourner's Kaddish that his colleague had died. When word of Ginsburg's death spread, many Jews were in services, praying from their homes as congregations broadcast over livestream.

The Spanish language sibling to the Miami Herald apologized after including an insert filled with anti-Semitic screeds. The publishers of both papers admitted the issue has been going on for months.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

A federal judge has blocked President Trump's executive order that would have effectively shut down popular Chinese app WeChat, ruling that the action represents a free speech violation.

WeChat, used by 1.2 billion users worldwide and 19 million people in the U.S., was set to stop operating in the U.S. on midnight Sunday following Trump's order invoking a national emergency and targeting the app on national security grounds.

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Heritage Moments

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Heritage Moments: The Buffalo congresswoman and the fight for equal pay

The World War II homefront was a special time and place for American women. With some 16 million men off to fight in Europe, North Africa and the Pacific, the war effort at home depended on women, who rolled up their sleeves and went to work in factories in unprecedented numbers — a mighty army of Rosie the Riveters. For the first time, the societal strictures that tethered women to unpaid work at home were loosening — and yet it was understood that when the men returned, the women would go back to being second-class citizens.

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