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Mike Groll/Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Cuomo's office again refutes sexual harassment charges

Two former female aides to Gov. Andrew Cuomo are accusing him of bad behavior, with one saying the governor sexually harassed her in incidents that included inappropriate touching and an invitation to play strip poker. Cuomo denies the allegations.

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WNY Land Conservancy

Refuge, recreation, gardens and the design philosophy behind Buffalo's Riverline Project

As the Western New York Land Conservency begins to take public comments on Buffalo's Riverline Project, the 1.5 mile stretch of land connecting Solar City in Downtown Buffalo to the DL&W Terminal, the team behind the concept is eager to bring their ideas to life. Paul Peters is Principal at Hood Design Studio, the group behind the project. He shared his insight on key elements that may be included, as well as the influence Frederick Law Olmsted continues to have on projects of this nature.

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Coronavirus

What You Need To Know

A major Buffalo-area interchange has made the top 100 list of most congested bottlenecks for trucks in America.

Mike Desmond

Russell Salvatore is facing accusations of unjustly firing the former head of maintenance for Russell’s Steaks, Chops & More and Salvatore’s Grand Hotel and committing COVID-19 violations.

With only about a month left before Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the New York legislature must agree on a budget for the next year, the two parties are still far apart on a proposal to legalize adult use marijuana, despite the governor's prediction that legalization would be a done deal in 2021.

Buffalo.edu

Federal health officials are expected to approve distribution of a new COVID-19 vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson. "This could be a game changer," said Dr. Nancy Nielsen, Senior Associate Dean for Health Policy at UB's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.


Caregiving Solutions: How some nursing homes avoided COVID-19 spikes

10 hours ago
Courtesy WGRZ.com

WGRZ has joined the Solutions Journalism Network and, along with The Buffalo News, Rochester Democrat & Chronical, Lockport Union-Sun & Journal, Minority Reporter, Niagara Gazette, WBFO, WHEC and WXXI, is looking into a variety of stories as they relate to how nursing homes handled the pandemic, while focusing on caregivers on the front lines.

There's something off about the butter in Canada that's left many flustered residents looking for answers.

For weeks, Canadians have increasingly churned up debate on social media with anecdotes about "hard" butter that fails to spread as easily as it once did.

WBFO News

Disparate Black political groups are working to plan a roadmap for political success for African Americans living in Erie County. But does the roadmap include the Erie County Democratic Committee?


The Buffalo Sabres have won two of their past three games, but suffered some major injuries over the past week. Buffalo Hockey Beat reporter Bill Hoppe gives an update on the Sabres health, Jeff Skinner and previews their upcoming games.

  

WNY Land Conservancy

As the Western New York Land Conservency begins to take public comments on Buffalo's Riverline Project, the 1.5 mile stretch of land connecting Solar City in Downtown Buffalo to the DL&W Terminal, the team behind the concept is eager to bring their ideas to life. Paul Peters is Principal at Hood Design Studio, the group behind the project. He shared his insight on key elements that may be included, as well as the influence Frederick Law Olmsted continues to have on projects of this nature.

WNY Land Conservancy

Big changes are coming to the 1.5 mile stretch of the unused railroad corridor that runs from Solar City in Downtown Buffalo to the DL&W Terminal.

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New Yorker writer Luke Mogelson says many of the insurrectionists he filmed at the Capitol "had no inkling that what they were doing was wrong or suspicion that it could result in any consequences."

The U.S. is still ramping up its vaccination program, hoping to finally clamp down on the COVID-19 pandemic. But even as vaccine doses are being rolled out, their makers are exploring several strategies to bolster them, hoping to protect people against worrying new variants that have sprung up in recent months, from South Africa to the U.K.

The traditional prelude to the Olympics, the torch relay, will look – and sound – a bit different this year, as spectators are asked to avoid crowds and dampen their cheers when the torch passes by them.

Members of the Tokyo Organizing Committee announced a series of pandemic measures on Thursday, including leaving the option open for suspending portions of the relay should health officials deem it necessary.

Newly disclosed documents from inside the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan capture a sense of panic and dread among prosecutors and their supervisors as one of their cases collapsed last year amid allegations of government misconduct.

When you think of the history of Black education in the United States, you might think of Brown vs. Board of Education and the fight to integrate public schools. But there's a parallel history too, of Black people pooling their resources to educate and empower themselves independently.

Enslaved people learned to read and write whenever and wherever they could, often in secret and against the law. "In accomplishing
this, I was compelled
 to resort to
various
 stratagems," like convincing white children to help him, wrote Frederick Douglass. "I had
no regular 
teacher."

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Invisible Army: Caregivers on the Front Lines

A new media initiative aims to shed light on caregivers for older adults and investigate potential solutions to their challenges.

Heritage Moments

Ilyas Ahmed/AMISOM

Heritage Moments: From a cubicle on Swan Street to the presidency of Somalia

Three world leaders have called Western New York their home. The first two, the American presidents Millard Fillmore and Grover Cleveland, are well known to people living in the region. The third is less celebrated here. But the story of Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed — the Buffalonian better known as Farmaajo, elected president of Somalia in February 2017 — is every bit as incredible, and momentous, as that of practically any leader anywhere.

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