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Less congested Black Friday morning at area retailers

The COVID-19 pandemic has kept crowds at shopping centers a bit smaller on Black Friday this year. Typically the largest in-person shopping day of the year, large crowds and long lines were few and far between at retailers like Best Buy in Amherst, Cabela’s, and the Walden Galleria Mall.

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WBFO Photo/Ryan Zunner

The Future of WNY Shopping Malls: Grocery Stores, Video Arenas & More

Already reeling from a shift in shopping trends, Western New York's shopping malls have been hearing the death knell for quite a while before COVID-19 changed, well, everything. Shuttered anchor stores litter the landscape. "But there should be a new dawn for retail in Western New York' says Burt Flickinger, retail consultant with The Strategic Resource Group consulting firm in New York City.

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Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

An annual outreach to Buffalo’s homeless community is becoming even more meaningful this year. 


WBFO Photo/Ryan Zunner

Already reeling from a shift in shopping trends, Western New York's shopping malls have been hearing the death knell for quite a while before COVID-19 changed, well, everything.  Shuttered anchor stores litter the landscape. 

"But there should be a new dawn for retail in Western New York' says Burt Flickinger, retail consultant with The Strategic Resource Group consulting firm in New York City.

Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

The COVID-19 pandemic has kept crowds at shopping centers a bit smaller on Black Friday this year. Typically the largest in-person shopping day of the year, large crowds and long lines were few and far between at retailers like Best Buy in Amherst, Cabela’s, and the Walden Galleria Mall.

Eileen Buckley, WBFO Archive Photo, 2012

Anthony and Peter adopt an attitude of gratitude for many things, including (so far) good health, the ability to work while socially distant, and for a theater community standing up to the challenge while artistic directors reexamine their missions.  Anthony is particularly  grateful that since Hollywood mostly shut down, his sister who worked for Warner Brothers was now free to move her family to Buffalo! So these days Anthony-the-arch-critic's raised eyebrow and his Grinch-like glare have softened into a big grin.


New York State Thruway Authority

A state senator is objecting to a proposal by the New York State Thruway Authority to raise tolls for drivers who don’t have an E-ZPass.

Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

The COVID-19 pandemic didn’t stop the YMCA from holding its 125th consecutive Turkey Trot race. A select-few lucky runners got the opportunity to take part in-person for the milestone race.


YouTube/Erie County

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Wednesday the state would take a few more days to determine whether to elevate Western New York's current COVID orange zones into shutdown red zones. Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz also addressed this, while the Erie County Health Commissioner displayed a model predicting how no restrictions might affect local hospitals.

photo by Mike Hetzel/used with permission of Buffalo Beauts

The good news for the Buffalo Beauts is they will have a hockey season this winter. However, they will not be playing it in front of local fans. The National Women's Hockey League announced the Beauts and its other five professional clubs will play a condensed season in a "bubble" format in Lake Placid, New York.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

The international commission that manages water levels on the Great Lakes is shrinking. It is also establishing an advisory group to broaden input from the public.

Stockphoto.com / NPR

The day before Thanksgiving is typically the busiest travel day of the year, but it won’t look nearly as busy this year. The American Automobile Association reported the pandemic is taking a big bite out of Thanksgiving travel plans.

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Musicians—who depend on live audiences as much as they do—have been especially hard hit by the pandemic. Perhaps nowhere has this been felt more acutely than in South Louisiana where music lies at the heart of Cajun culture.

They still gather on Saturday mornings at Marc Savoy's music store in the town of Eunice, amid the rice fields and crawfish farms in what's called Cajun prairie country. Musicians pull chairs into a circle—outside now because of the virus—to play the French Acadian ballads they learned from their grandparents.

Pandemic Takes Toll On Children's Mental Health

3 hours ago

As a toddler, Kenley Gupta stopped speaking after her mom died. Over the years, she recovered from the anxiety disorder, called mutism, but in March the 8-year-old went silent again.

The change occurred soon after her school shut down, and Kenley was shocked when her school closed.

"I was really sad I couldn't see my friends," she said.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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We've been reporting that more than 250,000 people have died of COVID-19 in this country. And here's another grim statistic. More than 100,000 of those deaths are people who live and work in long-term care facilities. That's according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Priya Chidambaram is a policy analyst there. She's been tracking COVID-19 in nursing homes. Welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

PRIYA CHIDAMBARAM: Hi, Ari. Thanks so much for having me.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Heritage Moments

The Buffalo Bills

Heritage Moments: The Buffalo Bills and the black players’ All-Star boycott of 1965

The 1965 AFL All-Star Game boycott by black players was a landmark moment in American sports. The previous generation of African-American athletes had all it could do to break the color barrier and secure footholds on professional rosters. But in 1965, the AFL’s new generation of black players upped the ante considerably, taking direct political action against racism for the first time -- and several Buffalo Bills helped lead the way.

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