Left: Courtesy of Tina Grato; Right: Courtesy of Kelly Frothingham

The Toll: Two daughters remember military parents lost to COVID-19

In the second story of WBFO’s new series, “The Toll: Western New York Stories of Loss & Survival in a Pandemic,” two daughters remember the veteran parents they lost earlier this year to COVID-19.

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Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Wednesday would have been opening day of the Erie County Fair, but there is no fair this year because of COVID-19. Even so, officials are trying to retain some features of the iconic summer event.

Erie County's register of COVID-19 cases has taken a big leap. The county Health Department has confirmed 38 new cases in Eden, essentially doubling the town's total.

New York State Senate

Family members of nursing home residents, testifying at a legislative hearing this week, told harrowing tales of neglect and unresponsive staff and administrators while the COVID-19 pandemic raged in New York this spring.

Kyle S. Mackie / WBFO

In a nearly hour-long interview with WBFO Wednesday, Superintendent of Buffalo Public Schools Dr. Kriner Cash spoke about the district’s reopening plans and why he doesn’t feel comfortable with a full in-person return to school buildings.


Left: Courtesy of Tina Grato; Right: Courtesy of Kelly Frothingham

In the second story of WBFO’s new series, “The Toll: Western New York Stories of Loss & Survival in a Pandemic,” two daughters remember the veteran parents they lost earlier this year to COVID-19.

WBFO news file

In the face of several uncertainties, the developer behind the proposed Amazon warehouse on Grand Island is pulling the project.


While several school districts throughout New York continue to deliberate how to safely open school this year, West Seneca will start at home. The District said they will utilize a multi-faceted plan that will reopen in phases. West Seneca Central School District Superintendent Matthew Bystrak shares how they came to make this decision.

Addressing the constant changing guidelines. Taking time to assess in person learning in smaller groups before allowing everyone back to school. Making sure the PPE they have is appropriate for the circumstances they have. Bystrak and West Seneca are taking precautions against the ambiguity of COVID-19 while committing resources to remote learning.

Nick Lippa / WBFO

Tops Friendly Markets is starting a new program that aims to reduce food waste. The local grocery store chain is allowing six of their Buffalo area stores to offer food nearing their sell-by-date at up to 50 percent through the app Flashfood.

C-SPAN, Jonathan Ernst/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Western New York Democratic leaders are responding to news of Kamala Harris being selected as Joe Biden’s running mate in the upcoming presidential election.


Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

The last iron beam was added to TMP Technologies' new facility at the former Bethlehem Steel site. TMP becomes the first tenant to the 150-acre commerce park owned by the Erie County-backed Industrial Land Development Corporation.

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If Joe Biden wins the presidency, his Justice Department will face a decision with huge legal and political implications: whether to investigate and prosecute President Trump.

So far, the candidate is approaching that question very carefully.

In a recent interview with NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro, Biden said: "I will not interfere with the Justice Department's judgment of whether or not they think they should pursue a prosecution."

In Annapolis, Md., young men and women in crisp white uniforms — and white masks — are doing what students here have been doing for 175 years — taking their first steps to becoming officers in the U.S. Navy.

These exercises are a part of the traditional "plebe summer," an intensive crash course that prepares first-year students for the transition to military life. They learn how to salute and march as a unit, along with lots of new lingo: floors are called "decks," toilets are "heads," and the students are "midshipmen."

Three associates of fallen R&B star R. Kelly were arrested and charged Tuesday by New York federal authorities. The three are accused of attempting to harass, threaten, intimidate and bribe several of Kelly's alleged victims of sexual abuse.

The men are 31-year-old Richard Arline Jr. a self-described friend of the singer; Donnell Russell, 45, a self-described "manager, advisor and friend" of Kelly; and Michael Williams, 37, who prosecutors say is a relative of one of Kelly's former publicists.

A federal judge in New York struck down a Trump administration decision to scale back U.S. government protections for migratory birds. The change by the administration would have allowed companies that accidentally kill migratory birds during the course of their work no longer to face the possibility of criminal prosecution.

In a 31-page document, U.S. District Judge Valerie Caproni cited the novel To Kill a Mockingbird to support her decision.

After George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis in late May, waves of anguished and outraged Americans took to the streets, to livestreamed city council meetings and to social media to denounce racism.

Protesters called for police reform, defunding or outright abolition; for an end to qualified immunity for officers; for reinvestment in underfunded communities; for schools, companies and communities to address their own complicity in racial inequity.

And they called for Confederate monuments to come down.

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Heritage Moments

University at Buffalo

Heritage Moments: A Clarence engineer and the invention that saved millions of lives

One day in 1956, Wilson Greatbatch, a 37-year-old assistant professor of electrical engineering at UB, was working on an oscilloscope at a chronic disease research center on Main Street. He reached to get a brown-black-orange resistor out of a box of tiny components but accidentally pulled out a brown-black-green one instead. Not noticing that he had a 1,000-kiloohm resistor rather than a 10-kiloohm, he installed it. The oscilloscope started pulsing to an astonishingly specific rhythm.

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