Amy Held

Amy Held is an editor on the newscast unit. She regularly reports breaking news on air and online.

Updated at 10:35 a.m. ET

Kim Darroch, the British ambassador to the U.S., has announced his resignation days after leaked cables revealed his sharp criticism of the Trump administration and the U.S. president responded by saying he will "no longer deal with him."

The Vatican department charged with overseeing Catholic education released an extensive document Monday decrying what it calls a "crisis" on whether gender can be an individual choice rather than being set by God or biology.

The document describes a culture-wide "disorientation" that serves to "cancel out" the natural difference between man and woman, as well as "destabilise the family as an institution."

Decrying the sorry state of salary and support for women's hockey, around 200 female players announced Thursday they won't play the game at the professional level across North America, until they get a league with "the resources that professional hockey demands and deserves."

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

A day after flames leaped through Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris sparking fears the beloved building could be consumed, Parisians sang and prayed in processions through the streets and held vigils Tuesday evening close to the church constructed more than eight centuries ago.

The cathedral stood blackened with much of its roof gone, its spire collapsed and charred rubble inside, but it remained standing, its main structure and two towers spared.

Updated on Tuesday at 5:25 a.m. ET

Notre Dame Cathedral, one of the world's most famous churches, erupted in flames Monday in Paris, losing its spire but remaining otherwise largely intact after firefighters worked through the night to contain the fire.

Nearly six months after a cartoon mocking Serena Williams unleashed immediate international rebuke, with critics calling it a racist Jim-Crow-era-like rendering of the sports star, the Australian Press Council weighed in on Monday, defending the image.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Beleaguered USA Gymnastics has named a new president and CEO — its fourth in two years — as the sport's governing body battles criticism that it ignored and even enabled widespread sex abuse by former team doctor Larry Nassar.

This Thanksgiving, bitter — possibly record — cold could be served up alongside slices of turkey in the eastern U.S., while snow the day before could complicate travel on one of the busiest travel days of the year. Farther west, rain in the forecast could be disastrous for a region already devastated by wildfires.

A cold front moving through the Northeast on Wednesday was spreading some light snow in New England and the northern Mid-Atlantic, said David Roth, forecaster with the National Weather Service's Weather Prediction Center.

Astros relief pitcher Brad Peacock has come down with hand, foot and mouth disease, a team spokesman confirmed to NPR, in Major League Baseball's third known case of the contagious virus this season.

Peacock is home recuperating in Houston, the Houston Chronicle reports, after falling ill while he was with the team last weekend in Boston. He was feeling worse by Monday in Detroit, where the team's medical staff attended to him before sending him home.

Cramped cabins, knocked knees, aggrieved elbows: all real problems for today's flyers. But the Federal Aviation Administration has said they aren't its problems — announcing Tuesday that it will not regulate airline seat size and legroom.

The decision came in the form of a letter responding to a lawsuit brought by the group Flyers Rights.

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

Kate Spade, the designer who built a billion-dollar brand of luxury handbags and accessories, was found dead in her Park Avenue apartment in Manhattan on Tuesday. She was 55.

New York Police Department officials said that police received a call around 10:30 a.m. and that officers found Spade unconscious and unresponsive in the bedroom of her Park Avenue apartment. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

"It was a suicide," NYPD spokeswoman Arlene Muniz told NPR, without providing further details.

Disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein appeared in a New York City courtroom Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to two counts of rape and one count of a criminal sex act, less than a week after a grand jury indicted him.

Weinstein, 66, had been expected to plead not guilty and remains free on bail.

Dozens of women have come forward to accuse Weinstein of persistent sexual misconduct.

It's not your imagination. A recent spike in home runs has hit professional baseball.

In 2015, Major League Baseball's home run rate averaged 1.01 per game (it had been 0.86 the year before). In 2016, it grew to 1.16. Last year it was 1.26.

Theories have abounded as to why, many centering on the balls having been altered, or "juiced."

The former school resource officer who remained outside during the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. — and resigned earlier this year amid intense public scorn — is receiving a monthly pension of $8,702.35.

The Florida Department of Management Services says Scot Peterson began receiving the payments last month, which do not include health insurance benefits.

Michigan State University has agreed in principle to pay $500 million to settle claims by hundreds of women and girls who say disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar abused them.

Under the terms of the agreement, the school will pay $425 million to those 332 current claimants, with $75 million set aside in a trust fund for any future claimants who allege sexual abuse by Nassar.

What began as an opportunity to talk real estate at a Philadelphia coffee shop and ended in the arrest of two black men has launched a week of outraged protest, accusations of racial discrimination and vows from Starbucks to do better.

Sir Alan Parker announced Thursday he was stepping down as chair of Save the Children International and resigning from the board. The move follows accusations of inappropriate behavior leveled against former leadership at the charity that bills itself as helping 50 million of the world's most vulnerable children each year.

"Given the complex mix of challenges the organisation and the sector is facing, it is my view that a change is needed," Parker said in a letter to his colleagues.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

No matter the adage or that the calendar tells us spring has sprung, March is still roaring like a lion on both sides of the country. On Wednesday, the West Coast braced for potential mudslides and flooding following heavy rain, and much of the East Coast dealt with a major snowstorm.

Updated at 3:08 a.m. ET Sunday

The storm system that pummeled much of the East Coast on Friday had moved hundreds of miles offshore by Saturday, but residual wind gusts and coastal flood threats, exacerbated by high tide, continued to plague the region from Maryland through Maine.

Scientists say the storm has met the definition of a "bomb cyclone," a dramatic name that seemed fitting for the vast damage already wrought over the region Saturday.

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

Shortly before noon Saturday, a man approached the north fence around the White House, removed a concealed handgun and fired several rounds, according to a Secret Service statement. None of those rounds appeared to have been aimed at the White House, the agency said.

The man then fatally shot himself in the head, the Secret Service said.

Under growing pressure to quit, Scott Blackmun, CEO of the United States Olympic Committee, resigned "due to ongoing health issues resulting from prostate cancer," according to a USOC statement on Wednesday.

Board member Susanne Lyons will step in as the acting CEO until a permanent replacement is named.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio filed a complaint Thursday on behalf of several abortion providers seeking to block a state law that bans abortions "because an unborn child has or may have Down Syndrome."

Governor John Kasich signed House Bill 214 into law late last year, although it is not scheduled to take effect until March 23, 2018.

Editor's Note: This story contains graphic language.

Ex-sports doctor Larry Nassar was handed his third sentence on Monday, this time of 40 to 125 years in prison after pleading guilty to molesting young gymnasts at an elite Michigan training facility.

Dozens of people gave victim statements last week in the Eaton County, Mich., courtroom. There, Randy Margraves, the father of two of them, charged at Nassar saying he wanted a minute alone with the "demon." Sheriff's deputies tackled him before he reached the former doctor.

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Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Determined to not let the momentum die, protesters once again converged on hundreds of cities — at home and abroad — for the second annual Women's March, seeking not only to unite in a call for social change but also to channel their fury into voter action.

In a move that shakes up more than a century of tradition, the Boy Scouts of America announced Wednesday that starting next year, it will welcome girls into some Scouting programs.