Brett Dahlberg

Brett is the health reporter and a producer at WXXI News. He has a master’s degree from the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism and before landing at WXXI, he was an intern at WNYC and with Ian Urbina of the New York Times. He also produced freelance reporting work focused on health and science in New York City.
 
Brett grew up in Bremerton, Washington, and holds a bachelor’s degree from Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.
 

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

As the number of new HIV cases in New York continues to fall, a report from the pharmaceutical company Merck has found that stigma toward the infection in younger generations is growing.

Lindsay Fox / Flickr / WRVO News

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center published new guidance Friday for doctors looking to diagnose lung injuries caused by vaping.

There’s a little more clarity now for doctors trying to diagnose lung injuries caused by vaping. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are sharing tools to help doctors pinpoint what’s causing those injuries.

Credit Paul Vernon / AP

A state appeals court in Seneca County has upheld New York’s elimination of religious exemptions to vaccine requirements.

The ruling from State Supreme Court Justice Daniel Doyle rejected claims that eliminating the exemptions was an unconstitutional infringement on religious rights.

Irfan Rahman’s laboratory sits at the end of a long hallway on the third floor of the University of Rochester’s School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

Bonnie Smorol had a tough choice. She has two aunts who had cancer that can be caused by a mutation in a certain gene.

Smorol, 60, did not meet the guidelines for genetic screening until the second aunt was diagnosed. Then, she had to decide how much she wanted to know about her own DNA.

“I did choose to be tested,” Smorol said. “I have a daughter with two daughters, so I wanted to see where this was going, and the testing unfortunately came back positive.”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

New York state will require health insurance companies to cover the cost of treatments to detect and prevent HIV infection starting next year, according to a letter circulated by the Department of Financial Services.

One of the newest pieces of public art in Rochester, N.Y., is right in the middle of Main Street. Or, more accurately, it's on the street.

Outside the Eastman School of Music, a group of volunteers repainted the crosswalk to look like three-dimensional piano keys in advance of the international jazz festival that happens here each year.

People walking by have been commenting on the artwork, but there's more here than meets the eye.

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

Sen. Chuck Schumer is calling on the federal government and drug manufacturer Merck to address what he called a “critical shortage” of a bladder cancer drug.

As New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the state Legislature indicate they’re moving closer to legalizing recreational marijuana, users and prescribers of medical cannabis – particularly in rural areas – have been wondering what the change will mean for them.

New York state keeps a list of medical marijuana practitioners in each county who agree to be named publicly.

"There’s panic," Marty Teller said, sitting in a conference room in the executive offices of the Finger Lakes Area Counseling and Recovery Agency. "What you’re really seeing is, the epidemic is rising."

For five rural counties around the Finger Lakes, FLACRA is the only provider of certain state-sanctioned treatments for opioid use disorder. On a per capita basis, those counties have some of the highest death rates due to opioid overdose in New York state.

A Rochester startup is looking to solve a medical problem with a global scope. VisualDx is building a database of what diseases look like on all skin colors, in an effort to correct persistent racial inequalities in diagnosis.

Scientists have known for decades about racial inequalities in access to medical care. A landmark 1985 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, for example, found that minority Americans lived further from doctors and had less ability to pay for medical care compared to white people.

Many American soldiers who attempt suicide have no prior mental health diagnosis, according to the most recent study to make use of data collected by the U.S. Army and the National Institute of Mental Health.