Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated June 7, 2021 at 10:55 PM ET

Vice President Harris, in her first foreign trip since taking office, had a direct message for Guatemalans thinking of migrating to the United States: "Do not come."

The nation's largest employer, the federal government, is beginning to plan for bringing many of its workers back into their offices, now that the coronavirus pandemic seems to be winding down in America.

Already, employees of the White House have been told to come back, or in many cases come to the office for the first time, next month. The Biden administration has also told other federal agencies to submit final plans for what it calls "the safe reentry of employees to the physical workplace" by July 19.

The recent Colonial Pipeline hack created shortages and panic-buying of gasoline, and also raised questions about federal oversight of critical energy infrastructure.

It may come as a surprise to learn that the Transportation Security Administration, whose officers screen luggage and carry-ons at airport check-in gates, also has responsibility for the cybersecurity of energy pipelines.

President Biden says East Coast gas shortages brought on by the cyberattack on Colonial Pipeline should begin to alleviate as soon as this weekend as the pipeline reaches full capacity, but he warned it will take several days before gas supplies are completely replenished.

"It's not like flicking on a light switch," Biden said, and "there may be some hiccups along the way," noting the pipeline has never been completely shut down before.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a case involving sentencing disparities between people found guilty of possessing crack cocaine and those possessing powdered forms, and whether recent changes in federal law should apply retroactively to those given long prison terms for small amounts of crack.

President Biden announced Wednesday that Americans have received 200 million COVID-19 vaccinations since he took office, double his initial goal of 100 million vaccinations in his first 100 days, and what he called "an incredible achievement for the nation."

Biden, who will officially cross the 100-day mark next week, also announced the availability of tax credits to employers who give their workers paid leave to get a shot.

"No working American should lose a single dollar from their paycheck because they are doing their patriotic duty to get vaccinated," Biden said.

Updated April 8, 2021 at 9:57 AM ET

President Biden on Thursday will announce initial steps his administration plans to take on firearm safety, along with the nomination of a prominent gun safety advocate to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The moves, which were previewed Wednesday evening by a senior administration official, come after recent high-profile mass shootings put added pressure on Biden to act on gun violence.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, is the agency we think of responding to natural disasters like hurricanes and earthquakes. But in recent weeks it's also been helping to administer COVID-19 vaccinations in several states, as well as assisting at the border.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last month FEMA was helping the Department of Health and Human Services place unaccompanied minors in shelters and with families. "They're playing a number of roles there to address what we feel is a significant problem and a significant challenge."

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy is calling for longer delivery times for some first-class mail, shorter hours for some post offices and more expensive postal rates — all part of a 10-year reorganization plan for the U.S. Postal Service he unveiled Tuesday.

DeJoy outlined the changes at a news conference with other Postal Service officials.

"This is a very positive vision," DeJoy said. If the Postal Service's long-term financial woes are not addressed, he said, the USPS will "run out of cash and require a government bailout."

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Karen Gibson begins her duties Monday as the U.S. Senate's sergeant-at-arms, the chief law enforcement officer for the upper chamber.

She replaces Michael Stenger, who resigned following the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol by a mob of Trump supporters.

Gibson is a retired Army lieutenant general who served as director of intelligence for U.S. Central Command. She'll be joined in the SAA office by new Deputy Sergeant-at-Arms Kelly Fado, who was an aide to former Senate Democratic leader Tom Daschle, and by a new chief of staff, Jennifer Hemingway.

Updated March 17, 2021 at 3:34 PM ET

If you've been putting off filing your tax return this year, here's some good news. The IRS and Treasury Department have delayed the filing deadline by another month.

Updated at 4:32 p.m. ET

If your mail has not been showing up some days or you're getting second notices on the bills you thought you'd paid, you're not alone. The U.S. Postal Service has been beset by continuing delays in delivering the mail.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy apologized for those delays in testimony before the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday but warned that the postal system is "in a death spiral" and needs legislation to help restore it to financial stability.

Members of the Senate on Tuesday were shown a graphic video at the start of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, laden with violence and obscenities shouted by the pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol building on Jan. 6.

Updated on Feb. 2 at 4:40 p.m. ET

It's been a rocky few months for the U.S. Postal Service.

Numerous lawsuits were filed over the post office's handling of mail-in ballots during November's elections. Then came the holiday season, and customers became frustrated by backlogs that meant their Christmas cards and packages weren't delivered until January.

Among those frustrated is Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., who says cards his office sent to constituents on Dec. 1 are still arriving at homes in his district.

Pascrell says enough is enough.

Updated at 3:33 p.m. ET

Saying it's time to act "because that's what faith and morality require us to do," President Biden on Tuesday signed four executive actions aimed at advancing racial equity for Americans the White House says have been underserved and left behind.

Biden said Tuesday that the measures follow one of his core campaign promises: to restore "the soul of the nation," as he often said during the presidential race.

"Our soul will be troubled," he said, "as long as systemic racism is allowed to exist."

President-elect Joe Biden, who will become the nation's second Roman Catholic president, is attending Mass this morning, along with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and congressional leaders at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C.

It's a church Biden attended both as vice president and as a senator, and it was the site of a service for the first Catholic president, John F. Kennedy, after his 1963 assassination.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

Last week's storming of the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob has already resulted in charges against 70 people, according to the acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, who said he expects the number "will grow into the hundreds."

In the first public briefing by the Justice Department and the FBI since Wednesday's riot, acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin and Steven D'Antuono, director of the FBI's Washington Field Office, outlined what Sherwin called a long-term investigation.

Updated at 3:07 p.m. ET

Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., who defended President Trump in the investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election, has been awarded the Medal of Freedom, the White House announced Monday.

In announcing the award, the White House said Nunes helped "unearth the crime of the century" and "thwart a plot to take down a sitting United States president" — despite both being patently false.

The award to Nunes was criticized by the watchdog group, the Government Accountability Project.

Updated on Dec. 30 at 11:15 a.m. ET

President Trump has signed a major legislative package that includes coronavirus relief and government spending for the next fiscal year.

Just after Congress passed the bill last week — and shortly before Christmas — the president called the measure a "disgrace," in part for not having high enough direct payments to Americans, a move his own party had been against.

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden plans to nominate former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg to be his secretary of transportation, the transition team announced on Tuesday.

Buttigieg, one of Biden's former rivals in the contest for the Democratic presidential nomination, is the first openly LGBTQ person to be nominated for a permanent Cabinet position.

"Mayor Pete Buttigieg is a patriot and a problem-solver who speaks to the best of who we are as a nation," Biden said in a statement.

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President-elect Joe Biden has begun planning his transition, naming a team of experts Monday to work on the coronavirus pandemic.

But one thing Biden cannot do at this point is move into any government office space or receive government funding for the transition.

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Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET

Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee moved Thursday to advance the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court, bringing President Trump's nominee within striking distance of confirmation and the court a step closer to a 6-3 conservative majority.

The U.S. Postal Service has settled a lawsuit in Montana that called on it to reverse service cutbacks in advance of next month's election. The suit was brought by Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, who is running for the U.S. Senate.

In a statement, Bullock said the settlement "will ensure stability through and beyond the election by immediately restoring the mail services folks rely on."

The Postal Service said it agreed to the settlement because "it has always been our goal to ensure that anyone who chooses to utilize the mail to vote can do so successfully."

This is scheduled to be the last day of Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation hearings, and after two days of questioning Barrett, senators will turn to character witnesses and those who are concerned about her likely elevation to the Supreme Court.

Barrett will not be present.

Republicans will call on Amanda Rauh-Bieri, a former law clerk for Barrett on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, and Laura Wolk, the first blind woman to clerk on the U.S. Supreme Court and who has called Barrett her mentor.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has, like many of the recent nominees before her, been unwilling to tip her hand as to how she might rule on potential high-profile cases if confirmed to the high court.

But she also has left some hints as to her leanings, especially on the topic of abortion rights. As a University of Notre Dame Law School professor, Barrett signed an ad that stated, "It's time to put an end to the barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade," referring to the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

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