Daniel Wood

Data gathered early in the pandemic showed that communities of color are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 across the United States. But incomplete data left a muddy picture of these disparities.

Today, as the U.S. has surpassed 200,000 COVID-19 deaths, and reached nearly 7 million confirmed cases, racial data is more complete, and the trend is crystal clear: People of color get sick and die of COVID-19 at rates higher than whites and higher than their share of the population.

A new national effort asks K-12 schools to voluntarily — and anonymously — report their confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases, along with the safety strategies they're using.

Note: This page is not being updated. Find a more up-to-date version of this data here.

In April, New Orleans health officials realized their drive-through testing strategy for the coronavirus wasn't working. The reason? Census tract data revealed hot spots for the virus were located in predominantly low-income African-American neighborhoods where many residents lacked cars.

This page is updated regularly.

On Sept. 28, the world marked a tragic milestone: 1 million deaths from COVID-19. That's according to a tally maintained by Johns Hopkins University. And public health experts believe the actual toll – the recorded deaths plus the unrecorded deaths – is much higher.

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This page is updated regularly.

More than 8 million people in the U.S. have had confirmed coronavirus infections and more than 225,000 have died of COVID-19. Tens of thousands of new cases are reported daily nationwide. In the graphics below, explore the trends in your state.