Daniel Wood

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Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

Data gathered early in the pandemic showed that communities of color are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 across the United States. But incomplete data left a muddy picture of these disparities.

Today, as the U.S. has surpassed 200,000 COVID-19 deaths, and reached nearly 7 million confirmed cases, racial data is more complete, and the trend is crystal clear: People of color get sick and die of COVID-19 at rates higher than whites and higher than their share of the population.

A new national effort asks K-12 schools to voluntarily — and anonymously — report their confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases, along with the safety strategies they're using.

Note: This page is not being updated. Find a more up-to-date version of this data here.

In April, New Orleans health officials realized their drive-through testing strategy for the coronavirus wasn't working. The reason? Census tract data revealed hot spots for the virus were located in predominantly low-income African-American neighborhoods where many residents lacked cars.

This page is updated regularly.

In late January 2020 only a few dozen COVID-19 infections had been identified outside of China. Now the virus has spread to every corner of the globe. More than 100 million infections have been reported worldwide, and the death toll is above 2 million, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University.

The United States has far more COVID cases and deaths than any other country. India and Brazil have the second and third highest tally of cases respectively.

How Severe Is Your State's Coronavirus Outbreak?

Mar 24, 2020

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This page is updated regularly.

More than 28 million people in the U.S. have had confirmed coronavirus infections and more than 498,000 have died of COVID-19. Tens of thousands of new cases are reported daily nationwide. In the graphics below, explore the trends in your state.