Gabriela Saldivia

A federal judge in New York struck down a Trump administration decision to scale back U.S. government protections for migratory birds. The change by the administration would have allowed companies that accidentally kill migratory birds during the course of their work no longer to face the possibility of criminal prosecution.

In a 31-page document, U.S. District Judge Valerie Caproni cited the novel To Kill a Mockingbird to support her decision.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A memorial was held Thursday for George Floyd, who died last week after a police officer pressed a knee into his neck while detaining him in Minneapolis, triggering protests across the country.

In front of a golden casket and flower bouquets, and against a backdrop of artwork depicting Floyd saying, "I can breathe now," his brother Philonise shared memories of growing up together, eating banana mayonnaise sandwiches and sleeping in the same bed as kids.

President Trump said auto executives are being given the "go ahead" to make ventilators and other metal products to help combat the shortages due to the coronavirus pandemic. It's unclear what other "metal" products Trump was referring to.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

In what London police are calling a "terrorist-related" incident, two people were stabbed in Streatham, a south London district on Sunday.

A third person has minor injuries, believed to have been caused by glass following the discharge of the police firearm, according to a statement from Metropolitan Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Lucy D'Orsi.

Updated at 12:15 a.m. Monday

The long wait is over for Kansas City. The Chiefs are Super Bowl champions for the first time in 50 years.

After a slow start in Super Bowl LIV, the Chiefs pulled off yet another double-digit comeback in the playoffs.

The Chiefs, led by quarterback Patrick Mahomes, navigated the San Francisco 49ers' defensive pressure by the fourth quarter. His two long touchdown passes took the Chiefs to a 31-20 victory Sunday over the 49ers.

Updated at 9:35 p.m. ET

A gunman opened fire during a church service Sunday morning in White Settlement, Texas, killing two people before two church members returned fire and killed him, authorities said.

"Preliminary reports indicated that the man entered the church and fired a weapon," White Settlement police Chief J.P. Bevering said at a press conference. "A couple of members of the church returned fire, striking the suspect, who died at the scene."

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Epstein, the wealthy financier accused of sex trafficking, was found unresponsive in his jail cell by an apparent suicide at approximately 6:30 a.m. Saturday, the Federal Bureau of Prisons said in a statement.

Epstein was transported by EMS from the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan to a local hospital for treatment of life-threatening injuries. He was subsequently pronounced dead by hospital staff.

The FBI is investigating.

Updated on Sept. 21 at 2:33 p.m. ET

If you feel like your commute is taking longer, that's because it is.

New survey data show the average American's commute inched up to 26.9 minutes from 26.6 minutes the previous year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2017 American Community Survey.

A former Vatican ambassador to the United States alleges in a 7,000 word letter that top Catholic Church officials, including Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis, were long aware of sexual misconduct allegations against former D.C. archbishop Cardinal Theodore McCarrick.

Last month, McCarrick resigned amid claims he sexually abused seminarians.

Kentucky's Attorney General announced on Thursday that the state is suing the pharmacy chain Walgreens for allegedly exacerbating the "man-made" opioid crisis, by playing a dual role in in the supply chain as both the distributor and dispenser.

The lawsuit also asserts the company willfully ignored its own safeguard systems that are designed to protect consumers and monitor their drug consumption.