Buffalo State accepting education students from D’Youville

Dec 13, 2016

Education students from D'Youville College can automatically be accepted and transferred to SUNY Buffalo State. WBFO's senior reporter Eileen Buckley says since D'Youville announced it was suspending its education program, Buffalo State is trying to accommodate any interested students.  

Outside the SUNY Buffalo State campus in Buffalo.
Credit WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley


“Their students can come into other programs and follow a very similar trajectory into the one they started at D’Youville,” said Wendy Paterson,  Dean and Professor of the School of Education at Buffalo State. 

In November D'Youville announced it would be restructuring its education program. But the suspension has forced some students to look elsewhere to study education. Paterson tells WBFO News each day Buffalo State is working to try accommodate more students.

“So these students will not actually have an admission fee. There is a code they have to put in when they apply. The application process is just to get them into our system, but I have accepted them. If they’ve been accepted at D’Youville in any teacher education program, I am accepting them here,” explained Paterson.

Wendy Paterson, Dean and Professor of the School of Education at Buffalo State.Credit WBFO News photo by Eileen BuckleyEdit | Remove

This week about four to five undergraduate students and a couple of graduate students have applied to Buffalo State.

“We will accept their credits, absolutely. Very similar courses. We’ve already looked at the content, so they won’t have lost anything and as far as having to retake anything, the only thing they will have to is to take courses they have not had the content of,” Paterson noted.

Newly named D'Youville President Dr. Lorrie Clemo explained to us last week it's important to rework the education program. Clemo said she wasn't worried about students seeking out other education programs, but promises when D'Youville's education program returns it will be the right fit for students.

“When it is rolled out again, it will be more aligned with the needs of K-through 12 in New York State as that industry is changing and evolving and it is a very fast moving industry. When that program is rolled out it will meet the needs of our students,” Clemo stated.

D'Youville expects the program to be on hold at least for the next three years.