Breonna Taylor

Buffalo Police announced Friday morning that charges have been filed in connection with a hit-and-run that left a bicyclist injured during Wednesday evening's Breonna Taylor protest in Niagara Square.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A meandering protest Thursday evening started in Buffalo's Niagara Square, worked through the East Side to murals near Broadway and Pratt Street of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, ultimately winding up at the Erie County Holding Center before a final return to Niagara Square. The event was focused on the Black Lives Matter movement, and included several people on bicycles  following the hit-and-run injury of a Slow Roll board member and well-known protester.


Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown said Thursday that an investigation is underway into the hit-and-run perpetrated by the driver of a pickup truck who sped into a crowd of protestors in Niagara Square Wednesday night.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A Breonna Taylor protest march winding its way back to Buffalo City Hall Wednesday evening was disrupted when a pickup truck drove through the crowd and drove away, leaving an injured legal observer on Niagara Square with apparent broken bones.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET Thursday

Two Louisville Metropolitan Police officers have been shot as protesters marched to demand justice for Breonna Taylor following a limited indictment by a Jefferson County grand jury.

The officers were fired on after responding to a separate "shots fired call" at about 8:30 p.m. ET, Chief Robert Schroeder said in a brief press conference Wednesday evening.

One suspect has been taken into custody, Schroeder said.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Buffalo Police are doing away with one of the most controversial elements of the war on drugs: no-knock warrants. That is the kind of police warrant where officers don't have to announce they are there and why. Instead, they just kick down the door and head in.

Becky Sullivan / NPR

While much of the national conversation about police reform has focused on race, gender also affects policing. Combine race and gender and you will find that women -- particularly Black women -- are being stopped by police much more often than two decades ago, and those stops are becoming much more troubling.