China

The Trump administration is preparing a new list of $300 billion worth of Chinese imports that would be hit with tariffs of up to 25%, after China retaliated Monday in the trade war between the world's two largest economies.

Updated at 4:19 p.m. ET

China is imposing new retaliatory tariffs on $60 billion worth of U.S. goods, days after the Trump administration said it would impose higher tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods. The latest tit-for-tat exchange comes as trade talks have failed to yield a deal.

U.S. stock prices plunged on the news. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 617 points Monday, or 2.4%, and the Nasdaq composite fell 3.4%.

Updated at 8:15 a.m. ET

As the day dawned across the U.S. on Friday, a new economic reality dawned with it: The tariffs long threatened against billions of dollars in Chinese goods took effect just at midnight ET while many Americans were sleeping — but Beijing was ready immediately with a wake-up call of its own.

Americans will spend more than $900 million this year on bottle rockets, Roman candles, and other fireworks. But those of us who want to celebrate Independence Day with a bang are almost totally dependent on China for supplies.

"Ninety-nine percent of the backyard consumer fireworks come directly from China," said Julie Heckman, executive director of the American Pyrotechnics Association. "And about 70 percent of the professional display fireworks are manufactured in China."

A man caught trying to sneak snakes in his socks across the Western New York border into Canada has pleaded guilty.

After more than a decade of fighting, a judge has awarded $461,000 to a Chinese tourist who sued the U.S. government after being injured by a border agent at Niagara Falls more than a decade ago.

Mike Igoe

Tuesday evening, WNED-TV will broadcast the premiere episode of "The Story of China," a PBS series that will explore that nation's lengthy history, culture and global impact. A former Buffalo television news reporter, who is now an instructor at a Western New York college, spent three years teaching in China and shared his experience with WBFO.


Reporters ask lots of pesky questions during campaigns for a reason: to find out how someone would govern.

Most candidates right and left comply with the public interest in what they would do by putting out policy papers and laying out facts and figures, numbers and details.

WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

The University at Buffalo continues to rank among the top 25 universities for enrolling international students. Earlier this week, the Institute of International Education released its Open Doors report, ranking UB 21st among American colleges and universities for international enrollment. WBFO's senior reporter Eileen Buckley tells us UB is preparing to expand its recruitment effort.

WBFO News file photo / WBFO News

Senator Charles Schumer is urging federal authorities to take action in assuring the safety of Halloween makeup.

File photo

Monday's rocky ride on Wall Street is nothing for long-term investors to worry about, according to expert Cristian Tiu.

iac2014.org

One of the world's biggest space gatherings just wrapped up in Toronto. Thousands of delegates gathered for the 65th International Astronautical Congress for five days of meetings and workshops covering everything from space debris to the law of outer space. But the conference was also marred by modern day politics.

Daniel Robison / WBFO

Western New York is home to more than 200 growing startup companies catering to specific medical and life science needs.

While these small businesses offer unique products and services, they don’t always have a market for their goods or the personnel to aggressively seek out buyers.

A new initiative will try to give at least 40 of these companies the extra sales muscle to move $25 million worth of local products in the next three years.

'Hand in glove'

The man the US Government once accused in an international incident at the Rainbow Bridge will now be their star witness in the case.

Robert Rhodes was accused of beating Chinese tourist Zhao Yan during her arrest in 2004. Rhodes was later acquitted of any charges, but only after he lost his job, his health and his savings. He has returned to work and is now being identified as a key witness for the government as they pursue a case against Yan.

For Rhodes, he believes his testimony could represent his complete exoneration in the case.