Conversations on Aging

Jay Moran/WBFO

The remaining Baby Boomers are on the verge of retiring out of the region's workforce. It's a development that could have devastating consequences. "One of the key issues, if you want to grow your economy, you've got to grow your workforce," said economist John Slenker, who sees hopeful signs that this area is once again attracting younger people.


Erie County Department of Senior Services

From mental health issues to fiscal benefits, it's usually better for seniors to stay in their homes instead of going to nursing facilities.  A program called EISEP looks to help by paying a modest wage to individuals who can assist seniors with certain in-home needs.

aarp.org

It may be illegal for job interviewers to ask about an applicant's age, but the practice is surprisingly common. According to Randy Hoak, Associate State Director for AARP New York, 44 percent  of "older workers looking for jobs" report being asked age-related questions in job interviews.  Few, however, file formal complaints over the practice.


Jay Moran/WBFO

For Deborah Waldrop, years of helping families cope with terminal illnesses have reinforced her commitment to her work.  The professor at the University at Buffalo School of Social Work sees advance directives as more than a "check of the box" in making final arrangements. "The end of life is a time when there's still growth and change happening."


Jay Moran/WBFO

While "aging in place" is an appealing option over life in a nursing facility, Assemblymember Monica Wallace believes there  is a lack of infrastructure to properly support that hopeful trend.  "Perhaps, they can't drive anymore and let's admit it, in Buffalo you really need a car to get around," Wallace offered as an example. A member of the Assembly Committee on Aging, Wallace says life at home for many seniors is difficult without appropriate support.