Dakota Access Pipeline

President Trump on Tuesday gave the go-ahead for construction of two controversial oil pipelines, the Keystone XL and the Dakota Access.

As he signed the paperwork in an Oval Office photo op, Trump said his administration is "going to renegotiate some of the terms" of the Keystone project, which would carry crude oil from the tar sands of western Canada and connect to an existing pipeline to the Gulf Coast.

Seneca Media & Communications Center

Protestors in North Dakota are celebrating a partial victory today, following the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ decision to halt construction of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. Also celebrating are members of the Western New York’s Seneca Nation of Indians, though their leader is still cautious about the future.


The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction of the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.