Electoral College

Office of the Governor

Former President Bill Clinton and former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were among the members of New York’s Electoral College who met in person at the State Capitol on Monday to cast the unanimous vote for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris for president and vice president.

Updated at 9:18 p.m. ET

On the day electors around the country voted to reaffirm his victory, President-elect Joe Biden called for Americans to come together in unity and healing, vowing to help pull the nation through the coronavirus pandemic and criticizing the dangerous and false rhetoric of election malfeasance that some Republicans have promoted.

He delivered a clear rebuke to President Trump, who continues to challenge the results unsuccessfully. "In America, politicians don't take power — people grant power to them," Biden said.

NPR

The Electoral College meets in all 50 states on Monday. In New York, officials have decided, reluctantly, to hold the event in person, despite the rising rate of the coronavirus.

Dan Clark / New York Now

New York’s most powerful Democrats, including Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton, will likely descend on the state capitol in Albany next week to participate in the state’s Electoral College vote, handing the state’s 29 electoral votes for former Vice President Joe Biden.

Karen DeWitt

Former President Bill Clinton cast his ballot for his wife, failed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, at Monday’s Electoral College meeting in Albany. Clinton blames the loss on the Russians and the FBI.

Donald J. Trump will be the next president of the United States.

That's been the case since Nov. 8, when Trump won 306 electoral votes, despite losing the national popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly 3 million.

And on Monday, the result was ratified by Electoral College voters, who gathered in state capitols across the United States to formally vote for president.

Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce CEO Bob Duffy

Electors are gathering Monday in every state to formally elect the President and Vice President of the United States. Usually this is a mere formality, but anti-Donald Trump forces are trying one last time to deny him the White House.

Electors from the 50 states will convene in their state capitols Monday and cast their votes for president. Republican Donald Trump is assured of a victory, unless there is a massive — and totally unexpected — defection by the electors who are pledged to support him.

Here are five things you should know about the Electoral College:

1. How do you get to be an elector?