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Facebook's latest foes: nearly every U.S. state. New York Attorney General Letitia James said Tuesday that a state-level antitrust investigation into the social network now has the backing of a bipartisan group of 47 attorneys general.

Albion Central Schools

Police will have an increased presence throughout the Albion Central School District Monday morning.

naacp.org

Following a Senate report that found Russian trolls influenced the 2016 election, advocates are urging people to join the #LogOutFacebook movement.

Updated 5:37 p.m. ET

Facebook says that it has discovered a security breach affecting nearly 50 million accounts and that it's not yet clear whether any information was accessed or any accounts were otherwise misused.

The vulnerability that caused the breach was found Tuesday and was fixed on Thursday night, Facebook says. It was the result of bugs introduced into Facebook's code in July 2017. No passwords or credit card numbers were stolen, the company says.

Chris Caya WBFO News

A new Digital Marketing Certificate will soon be available at SUNY Erie Community College. Its President, Dan Hocoy says, the college is partnering with Facebook to offer the program which will be a part of SUNY Erie's Workforce Development offerings. Hocoy says, it will include in-demand digital skills in social media marketing.

Online social media platforms including Facebook and Twitter have become a primary source of communication for many, from private citizens to the President of the United States. With that, arises legal questions, some of which are being examined by students at the University at Buffalo School of Law.

 

National Public Radio

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was praised by Rep. Chris Collins Wednesday during committee hearings looking at the social network's privacy issues and operations.

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Mark Zuckerberg faced dozens of senators — and the American television audience — to take "hard questions" on how Facebook has handled user data and faced efforts to subvert democracy.

"We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I'm sorry," the co-founder and CEO of Facebook, uncharacteristically wearing a suit, said in his opening remarks. "I started Facebook, I run it, and I'm responsible for what happens here."

Liam James Doyle/NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying on Capitol Hill to answer questions about protecting user data. The hearing held by the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees follows news that the data-mining and political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica obtained personal information of up to 87 million Facebook users. The firm is accused of using that information to target Facebook users with political advertising in 2016. The two Senate committees are holding a joint hearing called "Facebook, Social Media Privacy, and the Use and Abuse of Data."

buffalo.edu

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg's testimony today in Washington is drawing widespread interest. UB Law professor Mark Bartholomew will be among those following the proceedings "to hear about concrete plans to change." Bartholomew, who specializes in the areas of intellectual property and law and technology with an emphasis on online privacy, believes social media sites need to be regulated.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will face Congress in two separate hearings this week, as his company grapples with intense scrutiny over privacy and security on the social media site. It will be Zuckerberg's first appearance on Capitol Hill.

On Tuesday afternoon, more than 40 senators will crowd into a hearing room, where members of the Senate judiciary and commerce committees will have four minutes each to question Zuckerberg. A similar scene will play out Wednesday, when he is set to appear before members of House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Tianna Manon

More than 9 million New Yorkers had their personal data exposed last year. This includes social security numbers, financial information and driver license records.

National Public Radio

Some Democratic lawmakers are pushing for a measure that would make anonymous political ads on Facebook and other social media illegal. They say the ads are being abused to falsely represent their positions on issues.


Facebook is expanding its use of facial recognition software to alert users when photos of them are posted on the platform — whether or not they are tagged in the photo.

By default, Facebook users in the U.S. will be signed up for these face recognition alerts, unless they have previously opted out of a similar, more limited feature. But users can turn off face recognition, Facebook says.

Additionally, the company says it will roll out new tools to alert users if someone else may be impersonating them with a misleading profile photo.

Following the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Silicon Valley tech firms removed far-right groups from search results, cut off their websites and choked their ability to raise money online.

The moves have leaders on the far-right calling for the government to step in and regulate these companies. They have some strange bedfellows in this — many liberals also are calling for more regulation of the same companies.

On the far-right is Richard Spencer. He is a white supremacist.

For anyone still wondering if Mark Zuckerberg plans to run for president, today should dispel that myth. It appears that his tour of America — which many speculated is an effort to score political points — was designed to give the 33-year-old CEO a chance to learn about human behavior, in the physical and digital worlds, in order for him to build a better product. He wants to turn Facebook into a place where users form popular groups and hang out together, a lot.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

A nationwide manhunt for a suspect who allegedly shot an elderly man dead in Cleveland and then uploaded it to Facebook has ended with the man shooting and killing himself in Pennsylvania's Erie County.

"Steve Stephens was spotted this morning by [Pennsylvania State Police] members in Erie County," the state police said on its Twitter account. "After a brief pursuit, Stephens shot and killed himself."

A manhunt is under way for a suspect whom Cleveland police say filmed his fatal shooting of an elderly man, in a video that he posted to Facebook.

In a later video, also posted to Facebook on Sunday afternoon, a man purporting to be Steve Stephens, the accused shooter, says he has killed more than a dozen other people. Police have not verified that claim.

Cleveland police have identified the homicide victim from the video as 74-year-old Robert Godwin Sr.

The top U.S. Marine vowed in a Senate hearing to hold members of the Marine Corps accountable for sharing nude photos of female Marines online. But many members of the Senate Armed Services Committee responded with tough questions Tuesday, asking why more isn't being done to protect female service members.

Two local men with previous child pornography convictions have pleaded guilty to more charges.

WBFO's Mike Desmond

Social media isn't always the best place for political conversations, but Sunday afternoon hundreds showed up at Niagara Square in unity because of it.

WBFO's Mike Desmond / File Photo

It was supposed to be a sentencing hearing, but instead it turned out to be another change of representation for a Buffalo man facing up to 15 years in prison.

Schumer backs new social media legislation

Dec 20, 2015
WBFO News photo by Eileen Buckley

Senator Charles Schumer is pushing for a new legislation that will fight terrorists use of social media to recruit, raise money and inspire attacks.

A federal judge has ordered Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and the company to turn over documents and electronic correspondence that have been requested by Paul Ceglia's lawyer.

A Western New York man charged in what authorities call a multi-billion-dollar scheme to defraud Facebook and its Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is being held temporarily in Buffalo.

Paul Ceglia appeared in federal court downtown Friday afternoon after being arrested at his home in Wellsville in the morning. Ceglia had spent more than a year in Ireland.

The criminal charges against Ceglia were filed in New York City.  Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said Ceglia was seeking a "quick payday based on a blatant forgery.''