George Floyd

File Image/Buffalo Police

The Buffalo man accused of starting a fire inside a City Hall office May 30 was arraigned Thursday morning on additional counts.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A meandering protest Thursday evening started in Buffalo's Niagara Square, worked through the East Side to murals near Broadway and Pratt Street of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, ultimately winding up at the Erie County Holding Center before a final return to Niagara Square. The event was focused on the Black Lives Matter movement, and included several people on bicycles  following the hit-and-run injury of a Slow Roll board member and well-known protester.


Becky Sullivan / NPR

While much of the national conversation about police reform has focused on race, gender also affects policing. Combine race and gender and you will find that women -- particularly Black women -- are being stopped by police much more often than two decades ago, and those stops are becoming much more troubling.

Nick Lippa / WBFO News

The woman facing several state and federal charges in connection with driving into a line of police at a Buffalo protest was released from federal custody Thursday.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A Buffalo woman accused of driving her vehicle into three law enforcement officers has been granted a release from jail.

Courtesy of Pamela Fordham

Earlier this spring, Amherst Central High School decided not to offer a longtime elective class called “Race in America” during the coming school year. Then came the police killing of George Floyd, nationwide protests over systemic racism, and a group of students that wasn’t having it.


For advocates, white allyship involves action

Jun 30, 2020
Sarah Gager / WSKG

Systemic racism is one group of people controlling all major institutions and resources.

“White people are the problem,” said Anne Rhodes, member of the Tompkins County chapter of Standing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ). By not being engaged in racial justice, she said white people have allowed racial inequality.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Their demands were visible in the signs they carried, as protesters marched and drove from Buffalo's Niagara Square, through the Elmwood Village, and eventually to the Hamlin Park home of Mayor Byron Brown Wednesday. As protesters gathered, the mayor was escorted by police to an awaiting vehicle, which left the scene. The event was loud, but peaceful.


Thomas O'Neil-White / WBFO News

A group of protesters occupying Niagara Square was met by Buffalo police officers as they marched from downtown Buffalo to Mayor Byron Brown’s residence Wednesday evening. 


Buffalo Police

UPDATE: The man shown on video throwing a burning laundry basket through a broken window into City Hall during a night of unrest in Buffalo May 30 was ordered by a federal magistrate Monday to be released into home confinement. But the Buffalo News reports Courtland Renford, 20, remains in custody pending an appeal of the ruling to a district judge.

Buffalo Police are being accused of harassing a legal observer from the National Lawyers Guild at a downtown demonstration last week.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

The weeks since the killing of George Floyd have been a cauldron of outrage, frustration and, at times, violence. But on Friday, Juneteenth brought another emotion to this simmering mixture: the joy of celebration.

City of Buffalo

This year's Juneteenth may spark more demonstrations than celebrations, as tensions remain high after the recent death of George Floyd and other African Americans during encounters with police. Juneteenth historically recalls that day in 1865 when the enslaved flooded the streets of Galveston, TX to celebrate their newly announced freedom. But its 2020 observance also begs a look at systemic racism in its modern form.


Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A 75-year-old protester who struck his head on the pavement after being shoved back by police remains hospitalized with a fractured skull.

ag.ny.gov

New York Attorney General Letitia James is conducting public hearings on the interactions between police and the public during weeks of mass protests across the state, including in Buffalo.


Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

The Republican-led Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday held its first hearing on policing since the May 25 death of George Floyd — a black man who was killed in custody by Minneapolis police — triggered a wave of protests and international outcry for reform of the U.S. police system.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against nonwhites.

The order comes as the president faces tremendous pressure to take action following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police last month.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Protesters continued a takeover of Niagara Square Sunday, as they pushed for the release of Deyanna Davis from the Erie County Holding Center.

After almost three weeks of demonstrations following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody, America seems to be at a threshold moment.

Polling shows attitudes shifting more in favor of protesters and embracing the potential for change when it comes to how policing is done in this country.

Police departments in at least half a dozen states have already moved to make reforms, but when it comes to sweeping national change, it's not clear how far Washington will go.

Photo provided by Garang Doar

Recent protests over the death of George Floyd have pulled back the curtain on issues related to race in Buffalo. WBFO’s Madison Ruffo spoke with one city resident about his own experiences with racism. 


Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Buffalo Public Schools staffers, teachers and administrators are pushing for more African American history in what the district teaches, as well as pushing young people and their parents to vote and permanently change things.

Kyle S. Mackie / WBFO News

There is a growing movement to defund the police, after the death of George Floyd and incidences of police brutality in the nationwide protests that came in the aftermath. New York leaders say they would rather restructure the forces than cut their budgets.


WBFO News

Police seem to dominate so many conversation these days, as protests continue in Buffalo and around the world. A key issue in all of these conversations is the rules for becoming an officer and how an officer might lose that badge for bad behavior.

Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

The Buffalo Common Council is pushing for change in the city's police department, some longstanding issues and some growing out of the current string of protests across the world about police violence.

Updated 7:28 p.m. ET

George Floyd, whose killing by police inspired worldwide protests calling for an end to systemic racism and police brutality, was taken to a cemetery for burial Tuesday in his hometown of Houston.

The black man died May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for nearly 9 minutes. A video captured by a bystander showed Floyd pleading for air and calling out for his mother.

Floyd, 46, was to be buried next to his mother.

Syracuse.com / YouTube

The Syracuse Common Council is unanimously calling for the immediate suspension of a Syracuse police officer that broke rank and pushed a Syracuse.com/The Post Standard news photographer to the ground during one of the city's protests against police brutality. It happened on the night when protests turned violent, windows were smashed and stores were looted.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

The New York State Legislature met in session at the state capital Monday to begin work on a package of bills aimed at reforming the police. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has promised to sign them. If approved, New York would be the first state to act on police reforms since the death of George Floyd, an African American man in Minneapolis during an incident with police two weeks ago.


New York's legislature moved swiftly Monday to pass a first wave of police reform legislation, including a ban on chokeholds, a prohibition on race-based profiling, and a measure requiring police departments and courts to track arrests by race and ethnicity to help identify patterns of bias.

The session followed a historic wave of protests sparked by the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. The protests evolved into a referendum on police brutality.

Nick Lippa / WBFO

Protesters gathered around City Hall and the Erie County Holding Center Monday night calling for the release of Deyanna Davis, the driver of the vehicle that crashed into police on Bailey Avenue last week.

Judge Jeannice M. Reding set bail for Derek Chauvin at $1 million with conditions during a court hearing Monday, making the former Minneapolis police officer eligible for supervised release.

Chauvin, who is white, is charged with second-degree murder in the death of George Floyd, a black man. He attended the Hennepin County District Court hearing in Minneapolis via video link.

The former police officer could also be released without conditions at a higher bail amount of $1.25 million.

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