GOP

Karen DeWitt

There is going to be a change at the top in the state’s Republican Party. Erie County GOP Chair Nick Langworthy has gathered the support of the majority of county chairs and will be replacing Ed Cox In July. The two met with the media Tuesday to talk about the transition.


Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

President Trump abruptly halted spending talks at the White House on Wednesday, after congressional Democrats again rejected his demand for a $5.7 billion border wall.

On Twitter, Trump dismissed the negotiations as a "total waste of time," as a partial government shutdown stretched into its 19th day. He added, "I said bye-bye, nothing else works!"

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A couple hundred people showed up to Wednesday’s conservative rally in Elma, featuring former Trump Administration chief strategist Steve Bannon. For most Western New Yorkers, it was their first time seeing Bannon in person.

Nick Lippa / WBFO News

With the time to Electon Day starting to be measured in days and hours and not in weeks or months, conservative firebrand Steve Bannon came to town Wednesday to plead for other conservatives to go out to vote and encourage others to vote.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Republican Party chairs from the eight counties in the 27th congressional district spent three hours talking Tuesday night about how to get indicted Rep. Chris Collins (R-Clarence) off the November ballot and find a replacement.

NYS Governor's Office

Republican lawmakers in New York will hold hearings into recent decisions by the state parole board to release some high-profile offenders and the governor's decision to give voting rights to inmates.

Karen Dewitt / WBFO Albany Correspondent

The state’s largest teachers union brought bagpipe players and a brass band to New York's Capitol to push for a bill to decouple teacher evaluations from the results of standardized tests.

Change at the Erie County Water Authority is continuing, as Republicans now have to fill their remaining seat on the three-member board. County Legislature Minority Leader Joseph Lorigo says he wants that seat filled quickly.

NYGOP.org

New York State Republicans have endorsed Buffalo native Keith Wofford for the position of Attorney General.

Karen DeWitt

Another candidate has announced he will challenge Andrew Cuomo for governor. This time, it’s Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro, who offered a political indictment of Cuomo’s practices and temperament in office.


Congressman Tom Reed

Congressman Tom Reed says there is bipartisan agreement in Congress on improving the nation's infrastructure.

The 2018 election season is beginning, but state Republicans are still trying to settle on a strong candidate to challenge Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has said he wants to seek a third term.

Having failed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, Congress is now working on a tax overhaul. But it turns out the tax bills in the House and Senate also aim to reshape health care.

Here are five ways the tax legislation could change health policy:

1. Repeal the requirement for most people to have health insurance or pay a tax penalty

It took only one seat for Republicans to lose control of the Erie County Legislature Tuesday night.


Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

House Republicans unveiled a draft tax bill on Thursday, calling for deep cuts in both individual and corporate tax rates.

"With this bill, we will grow our economy by delivering more jobs, fairer taxes, and bigger paychecks to Americans of all walks of life," said Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.

File Photo / WBFO News

The political fallout from alleged sexual harassment by Sam Hoyt is turning into a political battle between the leaders of Erie County's two main political parties.

Bunny for Congress

Former Assistant District Attorney and veteran prosecutor Sean Bunny has announced his candidacy for Congress.

Republicans officially pulled the plug on their last-ditch effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Tuesday.

"We don't have the votes," said Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., after a closed-door meeting of Senate Republicans. "And since we don't have the votes, we've made the decision to postpone the vote." Cassidy, along with Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., put together the proposal they hoped could pass the Senate.

The proposal the Senate is considering that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would result in millions losing health insurance and a $133 billion reduction in the deficit by 2026, according to the Congressional Budget Office's report on the Graham-Cassidy legislation.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

Sen. John McCain may, once again, be the savior of President Barack Obama's signature domestic achievement.

The Arizona Republican announced in a statement on Friday that he opposes the latest GOP legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

Lawmakers have less than two weeks of legislative days to head off a government shutdown, raise the nation's borrowing limit and provide financial assistance in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Congress is back after a monthlong break, although it may not have seemed like Washington was on vacation based on the pace of political news in August.

WRVO's Tom Magnarelli

Central New York Republican State Sen. John DeFrancisco has been traveling around upstate meeting with members of his party to discuss the possibility of him running for governor next year. DeFrancisco said there is discontent with Gov. Andrew Cuomo on both sides of the aisle.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

The defeat of the GOP Senate health care bill is a major blow to all Republicans involved.

President Trump, whose approval rating is lower than any recent president this early in his term, is now staring at an agenda imperiled. Despite his boasts, he has achieved little of significance through Congress. That failure is compounded by the fact that his party controls both chambers.

The GOP's latest proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hews closely to the earlier bill that didn't win enough support among lawmakers to bring to a vote.

Perhaps the biggest change in the document released Thursday is that it leaves in place the Affordable Care Act taxes on wealthy individuals. It uses that money to reduce the number of people left without insurance coverage by the law's changes. This latest version adds $70 billion to a fund for states — bringing the total to $132 billion — to help support coverage of low-income people.

WBFO File Photo

While a new poll finds New Yorkers would like Gov. Andrew Cuomo to be a “national leader” challenging the policies of President Donald Trump’s administration, Cuomo seldom actually mentions the president by name.

Senate Republicans on Thursday unveiled their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare. The long-awaited plan marks a big step toward achieving one of the Republican Party's major goals.

A week after he was shot in the hip during a Republican baseball team practice, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise is now in fair condition, according to MedStar Washington Hospital Center.

He "is beginning an extended period of healing and rehabilitation," the hospital said in a statement Wednesday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says Republicans will release a discussion draft of their version of the health care bill on Thursday, with a vote likely next week.

Private health care talks have been underway in the Senate for weeks. McConnell tapped a 13-member working group last month to hash out senators' differences over the House-passed American Health Care Act. McConnell's office has since taken the lead drafting the Senate version of the party's long-promised legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

After weeks of will-they-or-won't-they tensions, the House managed to pass its GOP replacement for the Affordable Care Act on Thursday by a razor-thin margin. The vote was 217-213.

Democrats who lost the battle are still convinced they may win the political war. As the Republicans reached a majority for the bill, Democrats on the House floor began chanting, "Na, na, na, na ... hey, hey, hey ... goodbye." They say Republicans could lose their seats for supporting a bill that could cause so much disruption in voters' health care.

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