Haudenosaunee

WBFO file photo

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and its partners are rolling out a new program that will increase access to cancer care by people living in remote or underserved communities. Among the populations on which this program will place emphasis are Western New York’s Indigenous communities.

Noelle E. C. Evans | WXXI News

While election results won’t be official until absentee ballots are counted, one local Native American voter says that there is more than partisan politics on the line.

Kyle Mackie / WBFO News file

October 12 is a day with a mixture of meanings. For some, it’s Indigenous Peoples Day, for others it’s Italian Heritage Day, and of course federally it’s Columbus Day.

Indigenous demonstrators have returned to the site of a housing development at the center of a land dispute in southern Ontario, the day after nine people were arrested following a violent clash with police.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

The Buffalo History Museum launched a new family-friendly program Tuesday aimed at making the past come alive. It’s called Hands-On History, and it includes a mini-tour of select exhibits followed by related activities.


Seneca Nation

The Seneca Nation has welcomed back a piece of history for the first time in more than 150 years. A pipe tomahawk given to the legendary Seneca leader Cornplanter by George Washington in 1792 was unveiled at the Onohsagwe:de’ Cultural Center in Salamanca.

Scott McCall

The last time lacrosse was played as an official Olympic sport was 1908. That could change, given a three-year provisional acceptance into the International Olympic Committee for the Federation of International Lacrosse. It gives the sport’s governing body added resources and the option to apply for full-sport status in the future. But as lacrosse continues on track to achieve its Olympic dreams, what about those of the Native American athletes of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team?

Paul Lamont

Celebrations are set for Saturday’s grand opening of the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum’s new cultural center in Salamanca. The $18 million facility will showcase rarely seen artifacts of Seneca history and the living traditions of the Seneca people Wednesday. It also opens the way to the repatriation of Iroquois or Haudenosaunee artifacts in collections around the world.